Piazza Navona, Rome

4.5 out of 5 stars 173 Reviews

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Piazza Navona: The Egyptian Obelisk

    by machomikemd Written Jun 9, 2016

    this will be the picture of the obelisk in the fountain of the four rivers statue.

    If you watched the Movie Angels and Demons in 2009, this was the fountain where Cardinal and the would be Pope Baggia was thrown by the Assasin as the fourth altar of Illumination of which Robert Langdon saved the good Cardinal. This famous fountain is called the Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (Fountain of the Four Rivers), named after represent four major rivers of the four continents through which papal authority had spread: the Nile representing Africa, the Danube representing Europe, the Ganges representing Asia, and the Río de la Plata representing the Americas. The fountain was designed and built by 1651 by Gian Lorenzo Bernini for Pope Innocent X and also features an egpytian obelisk (one of the 13 obelisks from Alexandria in Egypt) in the middle.

    This famous Piazza which is famous world wide and is part of the infamous Angels and Demons Tour and the Movie, is a quadrangular plaza which was originally built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian (some ruins are present in the piazza) and was formerly called the "Circus Agonalis" of which the early romans watched various games and even some of the early Christian martyrs were executed in the area as well during those times.

    The area became a public market after the fall of the empire until the 15th century when Pope Innocent X started to make the plaza a huge public work of art, transforming it into a famous Baroque Roman architecture and artwork to beautify the surroundings of his family's palace, the Palazzo Pamphilj, which is in the Piazza.

    This pedestrian Piazza now boast of various public artworks and sculptures and other attractions such as Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi or Fountain of the Four Rivers by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Fontana del Moro by Giacomo Porta, Fountain of Neptune, also by Giacomo Porta, Palazzo Pamphilj (now the Brazilian embassy), Chiesa Sant'Agnese in Agone, Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore, Palazzo De Cupis, Chiesa Saint Nicolas des Lorrains , Museo - Stadio di Domiziano, Palazzo Braschi (Museo di Roma, etc. and various cafe's and restaurants and seasonal fairs and lots of painters, caricaturists, fortune-tellers and souvenir sellers. The area also has a variety of retail shops and artisanal stores.

    opens: 24/7

    Address: Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma, Lazio, Italy

    Directions: Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma, Lazio, Italy

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Piazza Navona: overview

    by machomikemd Updated Jun 9, 2016

    this will be a multi part tip with pictures in and around Piazza Navona.

    This famous Piazza which is famous world wide and is part of the infamous Angels and Demons Tour and the Movie, is a quadrangular plaza which was originally built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian (some ruins are present in the piazza) and was formerly called the "Circus Agonalis" of which the early romans watched various games and even some of the early Christian martyrs were executed in the area as well during those times.

    The area became a public market after the fall of the empire until the 15th century when Pope Innocent X started to make the plaza a huge public work of art, transforming it into a famous Baroque Roman architecture and artwork to beautify the surroundings of his family's palace, the Palazzo Pamphilj, which is in the Piazza.

    This pedestrian Piazza now boast of various public artworks and sculptures and other attractions such as Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi or Fountain of the Four Rivers by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Fontana del Moro by Giacomo Porta, Fountain of Neptune, also by Giacomo Porta, Palazzo Pamphilj (now the Brazilian embassy), Chiesa Sant'Agnese in Agone, Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore, Palazzo De Cupis, Chiesa Saint Nicolas des Lorrains , Museo - Stadio di Domiziano, Palazzo Braschi (Museo di Roma, etc. and various cafe's and restaurants and seasonal fairs and lots of painters, caricaturists, fortune-tellers and souvenir sellers. The area also has a variety of retail shops and artisanal stores.

    opens: 24/7

    Address: Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma, Lazio, Italy

    Directions: Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma Lazio, Italy

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  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Navona

    by xaver Updated Oct 7, 2015

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    This square is the one where the liveliness of Roman life is most tangible. It has long been a meeting place for the inhabitants of Rome.In the past this square was the place where markets, processions and spectacles were held.
    Today life in the piazza revolves around the open-air-cafés and the seasonal fairs.
    The most popular seasonal fair is held in december and january and during the fair toys and crib figures are sold.
    Just know that cafes here are ricously expensive, so if you don't want to pay a fortune for a coffe, simply walk a few meters away.

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    Piazza Novana

    by apbeaches Updated Aug 20, 2015

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    Piazza Navona is one of the most famous and arguably the most beautiful of Rome's many squares. The large and lively square features no less than three magnificent fountains. Another eyecatcher is the Baroque church of Sant'Agnese in Agone. The square is built on the former Stadium of Domitian, built by Emperor Domitian in 86 AD. Hence the long, oval shape of the square. The stadium, which had a larger arena than the Colosseum was mainly used for festivals and sporting events. The stadium was known as 'Circus Agonalis'. In the fifteenth century the stadium was paved over to create the Navona square, but remnants of Domitian's stadium are still visible around the area. Guided tours to this underground monument are available, they start at Piazza Tor Sanguigna.

    The main attraction of Piazza Navona is the trio of fountains that adorn the square. The central and largest fountain is the Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (Fountain of the Four Rivers). It was constructed between 1647 and 1651 on request of pope Innocent X. The design of the fountain was first commissioned to Borromini, but it was ultimately handed to his rival Bernini. The fountain features four figures, each representing a river from a different continent - the Nile, Ganges, Danube and Rio de la Plata. The statues are at the base of a rock supporting an obelisk, originally located at the Circus of Maxentius, near the Appian Way.

    The two other fountains on the piazza are the Fontana del Nettuno (Neptune fountain) at the northern end and the Fontana del Moro (Moor fountain) at the southern end of the square. The Fontana del Nettuno, also known as the Calderari, was built in 1576 by Giacomo della Porta. The statues of Neptune surrounded by sea nymphs were added in the nineteenth century.

    The church of Sant'Agnese in Agone. was built in 1652 by Pope Innocent X and built on the site where according to legend, St. Agnes was stripped naked, but miraculously saved from disgrace by extraordinary growth of hair. The front facade of the Baroque church was designed by Borromini, Bernini's main rival. Construction started just two years after the completion of Bernini's Fountain of the Four Rivers, right in front of the building. The church was completed in 1670.

    Address: Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma, Italy

    Directions: The Piazza Navona is situated in the historic center of Rome, west of the Pantheon. It is one of Rome's liveliest squares, with many outdoor cafes, restaurants and night clubs in the neighborhood.

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  • moviegal226's Profile Photo

    Picture Perfect Rome

    by moviegal226 Written Apr 13, 2015

    Ah, Piazza Navona! It's so beautiful and really exudes all the charm of Rome. Bustling with tourists and locals, street musicians, artists and more. Check it out at least once if you are in the city. The fountains are breathtaking (but hang on to your valuables as pickpockets are all over the place). This is my most favorite piazza in all of Rome. When you picture Rome in your head, this is the place you are thinking of. You won't be disappointed.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    One of the city's most beautiful piazzas

    by Jefie Updated Nov 25, 2014

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    Piazza Navona is widely known as one of Rome's, in fact, as one of the world's most beautiful piazzas. Built over the 1st-century Stadium of Domitian, the piazza has kept the oval shape of the ancient site (as such, it reminded me of the Piazza Anfiteatro in Lucca). The piazza as we know it today came to life in the 15th century, and owes much of its beauty to the Baroque additions that were made in the 17th century under Pope Innoncent X. Perhaps one of the most famous of these additions is Bernini's beautiful Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (1651) at the centre of the piazza, in front of the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone. Two more Baroque fountains were erected on the north and south ends of the piazza, the Fontana del Nettuno (1574) and the Fontana del Moro (1575), both created by Giacomo della Porta. The buildings around the piazza are home to many caffes, bars and restaurants, but the piazza's beauty and popularity make for rather high prices. If you're on a tight budget, I recommend eating at one of the restaurants located on a side street off the piazza, and perhaps coming back to the piazza for dessert. You can either walk around the piazza while savouring some delicious gelato, or splurge on a delicious chocolate tartufo at Tre Scalini. You can also do like we did and bring a take out lunch and eat it on one of the piazza's benches - you'll get to enjoy its atmosphere for a fraction of the price!

    Address: Piazza Navona

    Directions: Northwest of Rome's city centre, not far from the Pantheon

    Website: http://www.navonasquare.com/en/index.php

    Close-up view of Bernini's Fountain Piazza Navona in Rome Fontana delle Nettuno at Piazza Navona Eating on the cheap at Piazza Navona!
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Rome's Living Room

    by solopes Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    Everybody meets in Piazza Navona.

    A masterpiece of baroque, this place with the shape of a roman stadium, is dominated by the three fountains, with evidence to the Fontana dei Fiumi.

    The permanent crowds, the stalls, the street performers, make this place one of the liveliest in Rome.

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  • egonwegh's Profile Photo

    Piazza Navone

    by egonwegh Updated Jun 13, 2014

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    Piazza Navone, I visited both in day time and after dark. I think more than one visit is required to get a good impression of this site. The good news is: however short your stay in Rome may be, you will easily be able to fit in more than one visit to Piazza Navone, because the square is not too far from several other attractions in Rome (Spanish Steps, Pantheon etc.)

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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Piazza Navona

    by brendareed Updated Jun 2, 2014

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    We wandered over to Piazza Navona mainly because I wanted to see Bernini’s famous Four Rivers fountain. What we found was a neat piazza that, while it recognizes the many tourists that come here, it still seemed to have a local feel to it.

    Piazza Navona is big – or rather I should say long. It gets it shape from the ancient stadium that was built by Domitian in the 1st century. Over the years, various popes have added to the surrounding area, but the general shape remains the same. In fact, you can see the footprint of the ancient stadium’s northern curve under the modern buildings of the next piazza to the north of Navona – the Piazza Tor Sanguigna. While the piazza is set on an ancient site, the redesign of the piazza into a local community spot didn’t occur until the 1600s when Pope Innocent X decided to fix up the piazza that was home to his family palazzo.

    The Piazza Navona is famous for Bernini’s fountain, which sits in the center of the long plaza (see my separate Fountain of the Four Rivers tip about this fountain) and its obelisk for which the fountain was built around. At either end of the piazza are two additional fountains, each attracting tourists as they sit along the edges and enjoy a pleasant care-free moment.

    At the northern end of the piazza is the Fontana di Nattuno, which depicts Neptune fighting with some sort of sea monster or giant squid like thing. This fountain is more recent, being built in the late 1800s.

    At the southern end of the piazza is the Fontana del Moro, built in 1576, although what you see today are replicas with the originals on display at the Villa Borghese. The main focus of this fountain is the Moor standing in the center with mermen blowing through their shells on either side.

    While we wandered along the piazza, we just enjoyed watching the people. Children chasing the pigeons, people having lunch or just soaking up the warmth of the sun, and tourists taking photos of everything (yeah – I was one of them!). As we sat on a bench to relax, we listened to the two boys on the next bench calling out to anyone that would listen to them to buy their fresh squeezed orange juice. Chatting with them (and getting their photo), we learned that they were two American students in Rome for school who decided to make a little extra cash. I’m not sure how much they made from their bench since I didn’t see anyone else come to their make-shift juice stand, which consisted of a flimsy tray, a juicer, and a bag of sugar. But they were enjoying the day and having fun so all was good.

    At the northern end of the piazza was an art show – easels displaying the works of local artists. It fit my idea of Rome – so much fine art in this town that they should have a vibrant local art scene. Cafes were all around this end of the piazza (not so much on the southern end) and the homes as well as the church of Sant’Agnese in Agone that line the piazza were beautiful. Sadly, I wasn’t able to get into the church, which is supposed to be built on the site where in AD 304 St. Agnes was exposed in efforts to get her to recant her faith. Next time in Rome (I guess I need to throw that coin into the Trevi Fountain with all this thinking about my next time in this city…)!

    Piazza Navona is not far from many of the wonderful churches of Rome. It is just around the corner from the San Luigi dei Francesi (home to three magnificent Caravaggio paintings) and a couple blocks away from the Pantheon. And be sure to stop by for a quick look at one of Rome’s talking statues, Pasquino, which rests right around the corner from the southern tip of the Piazza Navona.

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Circus, Circus

    by goodfish Updated May 15, 2013

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    Piazza Navona is one of Rome’s great public spaces and one that people have been flocking to for nearly two millennia - although for different reasons. Emperor Domitian built his Circus Agonalis (‘agone' meaning games or competitions) here in 85 AD: a giant stadium that would hold 15-20,000 people and which was occasionally flooded, like the Colosseum, for mock aquatic battles. In the 15th century the ruin, long left to deteriorate after the fall of the empire and looted for its marble and stone, became a marketplace, and a grand rebuilding plan added palaces and churches to its perimeter in the 17th. Three splashing fountains were commission for the center, their drains plugged on hot summer days to overflow and fill the square with cool water for the enjoyment and relief of citizens and their 4-legged friends.

    The marketplace was moved to Campo de Fiori in the 1800’s and today this beloved of Rome’s public ‘living rooms’ is ringed with trattorias and shops and buzzing with artisans, musicians, tourists, locals, and vendors hawking goods of dubious quality. Circus Agonalis may be long gone but the square retains the distinctive oval shape of the arena and vestiges of its name: Navona is an evolution of ‘in agone’.

    Sant’Agnese (St. Agnes) in Agone towers over the west central side of the piazza: a 17th-century baroque church with the fingerprints of Borromini, Bernini and several other architects in its design. It harbors the grisly skull of a virginal, 4th-century martyr - who stubbornly survived burning first - thought to have been beheaded in the square. There are said to be ruins of the old circus under its foundations but we’ve never found the doors unlocked.

    The fountains? Still splashing merrily away with Bernini’s gorgeous Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (Fountain of the Four Rivers) taking center stage. It’s crowned with a obelisk old Domitian had made and shipped from Egypt for a temple complex in Campus Martius and which later ended up in Maxentius’ circus out on the Appia Antica. Some 1000 years hence, Bernini collected the broken bits and pasted them together again for his masterpiece. This bit of efficient recycling was probably a good move as the thing had been commissioned by Pope Innocent X during a time of severe economic stress: his flock were pretty cranky about spending money on fountains.

    Grab a gelato and a bench….

    http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/beni-culturali/beni-architettonici-e-storici/piazza-navona.html

    Note: the ULR below links to a nice shot of the piazza from above so you can see the shape.

    http://tinyurl.com/975df9v

    Address: Piazza Navona

    Directions: PANTHEON AREA: A couple of blocks west of the Pantheon

    Website: http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/beni-culturali/beni-architettonici-e-storici/piazza-navona.html

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  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    06-The Best Place to Laze - Piazza Navona

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Sep 3, 2012

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    The Piazza Navona is a good 20-minutes walk from the Spanish Steps. You enter it from an alley and suddenly the wide, spacious city centre hits you in the face. Your first impression is of a stadium and that was what it was earlier. It covers the area where Rome's first stadium was built (81 to 96 AD) by Emperor Domitian. It was then known as Circus Agonalis or an area set aside for competitions where ‘Agones’ or competitions were held in honour of Jove. Over the years, the name was shortened to 'in Agona' and then finally, 'Navona'. It was Pope Innocent X who revamped this piazza by erecting the Fontana Dei Quattro Fiumi in the centre and flanking it by restoring the two fountains, one on either side of the piazza.

    This area, like other areas in Rome, is vehicle-free. So you have a huge place in which to stroll, ‘people watch’, get your caricature sketched, stop at any of the numerous cafes for a lazy coffee or an equally leisurely lunch. We had packed out hamper, so we selected a shady spot, spread our food and wine and then proceed to do full justice to a morning well spent. It is in the evenings, however, that this place comes alive with street performers, music and the parade of life.

    The imposing fountain of the Four Rivers dominates the centre of the piazza and that is where your gaze is immediately drawn. The four giant figures are representative of the four mighty rivers known at that point in world history: the Rio de la Plata of the Americas, the Ganges of Asia, the Nile of Africa (veiled head statue as the source of the river had not been discovered till then) and Danube of Europe. Seven animals adorn the fountain - crocodile, dolphin, dragon, horse, lion, sea monster and a serpent. A dove, symbolic of the Holy Spirit, sits atop the huge obelisk rising from the centre of the fountain and is a reminder of the Pope who commissioned the work.

    The two fountains, one on either end of the piazza, were built by Giacomo della Porta. One is the Fountain of the Moor (owing to the statue with African features) while the other is the Fountain of Neptune. The two together add harmony and balance to the piazza with the main fountain in the centre.

    The church, Sant'Agnese in Agone, designed by Borromini, sits right in front of the fountain. It was built much after the fountain. So don’t be misled by the apocryphal story of the figure facing the Church raising its hand for fear that the structure would fall on him.

    Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do near the fountains as there are security cameras around. Check this out:

    “In the early hours of Saturday, 3rd September 2011, the Fontana del Moro was damaged by a vandal. Police later found the man, who had been captured on security cameras climbing in the fountain, wielding a large rock and decapitating some of the larger and smaller figures, after they recognised him by his sneakers.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piazza_Navona)

    First Written: Sep. 3, 2012

    Address: Piazza Navona, 00186 Rome, Italy

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Piazza Navona

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jul 1, 2012

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    Piazza Navona is a famous city square that better represents the 'bombastic' Baroque Epoch in Rome. It is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans came there to watch the agones ("games"), and hence it was known as 'Circus Agonalis' (competition arena). It is believed that over time the name changed to 'in agone' to 'navone' and eventually to 'navona'.
    Piazza Navona, which is a pedestrian area now, has 3 baroque fountains and the central one (Fountain of Four Rivers) designed by Bernini.
    Opposite to the piazza Navona fountain, we can find Sant' Agnese in Agone Church, which facade (by Borromini) is one of the most famous baroque masterpieces of Rome.

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  • Ines_'s Profile Photo

    Piazza Navona

    by Ines_ Written Mar 18, 2012

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    Piazza Navona is, for me, the most beautiful square in Rome. It has two incredible fountains, being the “Four Rivers Fountain” (represents Danube, Ganges, Nile, and Rio de la Plata) the most well-known.

    In the square you can also find church, lots of restaurants, at afternoon/evening: artists and also a café (Tre Scalini) that serves Tartufo: a rich handmade chocolate ice cream roll – if you want to eat it seated on the restaurant the price will double.

    Advice: just bring it outside and eat it one of the Piazza’s benches.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Possibly the most charming of Rome's Piazzas

    by zadunajska8 Written Oct 23, 2011

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    We were delighted to find the Piazza Navona. It really is a charming and romantic square which felt much more relaxed than the frantic city does generally. The 3 fountains are all beautiful but the central fountain of the 4 rivers is a remarkable work of art, especially when viewed at sunset with the church of St Agnes in Agony as a backdrop. The restaurants and cafes on the square are naturally somewhat overpriced due to their location, but it is worth stoping at least for a coffee and a bit of people watching in one of them in my opinion, just for the experience. All the restaurants do seem to be quite aggressive in trying to get passersby in to their premises however, which can be annoying.

    Directions: In the Centro Storico

    St Agnes in Agony Church in Piazza Navona Piazza Navona Fountain of 4 Rivers, Piazza Navona Piazza Navona Fountain of 4 Rivers, Piazza Navona
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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    The Ultimate Roman Piazza

    by iblatt Written Sep 24, 2011

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    I first read about Piazza Navona in a book about the history of art for children, before I ever visited it. The book told the story of the Baroque sculptor and architect Bernini, who lost the contract to build the church in Piazza Navona to his competitor, and then took his revenge: When he designed the Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (Fountain of the four Rivers) in the center of the piazza, one prominent figure appears as if he is afraid the church is going to collapse and fall on his head (see main photo).

    Since then I have visited Rome several times, and every time I am drawn to this magnificent Baroque piazza. You walk through the small lanes of old Rome and it suddenly opens up in front of you in all its beauty. In its center there is the Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi. The four river-gods of the world recline majestically, representing the four continents where Papal dominance had spread by the 17th century: Danube (representing Europe), Nile (Africa), Ganges (Asia) and Plate (America). An obelisk with the Pamphili family emblem (dove and olive twig) towers above them.

    This is only one detail of the great harmonious whole which makes Piazza Navona what it is. In Roman times there was a stadium in this place, which accounts for its elongated shape.
    In the 16th century this was Rome's public market square. The piazza as we see it today was commissioned by Pope Innocent X in the 17th century, glorifying his family, the Pamphili. The Pamphili palace (by Rainaldi), the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone (by Borromini and others), and two smaller fountains at either end of the piazza are other parts of the whole harmonious ensemble.

    But besides the buildings, sculptures and fountains, the other source of attraction of Piazza Navona are the people. Romans and, of course, lots of tourists, some of them first-timers in Rome who try to take it all in. There are street artists, local bands playing popular Italian melodies, photographers, tour guides, and lots of people in the cafes and restaurants.

    One thing is sure: Piazza Navona is a must in every visit to Rome!

    Directions: Near Corso del Rinascimento. The piazza is hidden from the main street, but is well signposted, or just ask any Roman or tourist for directions!
    There is a tourist information office on the northern side of the piazza.

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piazza_Navona

    Bernini Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi: detail Piazza Navona, Rome Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi: detail Musicians on Piazza Navona
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