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Rome Segway Tour: Villa Borghese
"After receiving a comprehensive overview of your Segway from your expert guide you’ll be ready to conquer Rome's Villa Borghese park in style! As you glide the short distance from your meeting point to the park pass the must-see Spanish Steps -- the famous 138-step staircase leading up from Piazza di Spagna.Villa Borghese opened in 1903 is the largest public park in Rome. The 148-acre (80-hectare) park features wide shady lanes lined by temples beautiful fountains
From EUR75.00
 
Villa Borghese Bike Tour in Rome
"Meet next to the Vatican Museums then group up and go to the South entrance of Villa Borghese in about 10-15 minutes from here start your tour inside the park:Little House ValadierCollina del Pincio (Pincian Hill the greatest view over the center of Rome)The Puppets TheaterThe Water ClockAntinoo's ObeliskThe Gardens of the LakeEsculapio's TempleSettimio Severo's ArcSiena's SquareThe Globe TheaterLittle House of the Cinema (coff Bernini Titian
From EUR39.00
 
Vintage Vespa Tour with Gourmet Picnic Experience at Villa Borghese
"The best way to visit Rome is on board of a 2-wheels vehicle do as the Romans do to live an experience as a local. Meet your friendly driver at the meeting point and start your roman adventure that will take you alongside the Aurelian Walls and the River Tiber passing through ancient monumental city gates.Get a breathtaking view of the Colosseum and Ancient Rome stop for your best picture then head to secret and unusual streets and alleys not reachable just by walking. You’ll drink from the Roman fountains that to this day provide the city with the best public water supply in Italy. you’ll visit the Aventine Hil will have a spy from the famous key hole  the time-honoured Appian Way and the remains of ancient Roman aqueducts and baths. As a special treat
From EUR135.00

Villa Borghese Tips (78)

An absolute must-see art museum in Rome

The former Casina Borghese houses the Borghese family's amazing collection of sculptures and paintings. Cardinal Scipione Borghese, for whom the villa was originally built, was an avid art collector, commissioning several art works from Bernini and Caravaggio. The sculptures and paintings of these two famous Baroque artists are on display in the 20 magnificient rooms of the museum, along with other works by the likes of Raphael, Titian and Rubens. Galleria Borghese is the only museum we visited in Rome (mostly because the city's numerous churches are like free museums!), but I'm sure glad we did because seeing the sculptures of Bernini with my own eyes, especially "The Rape of Prosperine" and "Apollo and Daphne", was worth the price of admission (11 Euros) in itself. Also, given its modest size, it's a museum you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. The 2 hours you are given to explore its rooms are more than sufficient and, because of this time limit, the museum never gets overcrowded. However, if you wish to visit the museum, I highly recommend booking tickets in advance (you can book tickets online). We were there on a Sunday and the museum was sold out until Wednesday, so I saw many visitors turn back with a rather disappointed look on their face.

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Jefie
Jul 19, 2016

Third Largest Public Garden in Rome 2

part two of my tips with more pictures around the huge area

The Villa Borghese Gardens in The Center of Rome is the Third Largest Public Garden of Rome after Villa Doria Pamphili and Villa Ada. This huge area coveres about 80 hectares (148 acres) and encompasses many Villas, Squares and Gardens and other points of attraction. This garden was built by architect Flaminio Ponzio fro a former vineyard to it's present size in 1605 as commissioned by notorious Borgia nephew (Pope Paul VI), Cardinal Scipione Borghese. The public garden has many places where the public can hang around and also view the famous attractions such as The Secret Gardens, Valley of Plain Trees, Piazza di Siena, the Temple of Diana, Villa Borghese, Villa Giulia, Villa Medici and Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna to name a few. You need at least two days to see all the attractions at this public park.

Opens: 24/7

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machomikemd
Jun 03, 2016

Viale Giorgio Washington Entrance

there are many Entrances to the huge Villa Borghese Public Gardens but the most spectacular entrance will be along the Viale Giorgio Washington Entrance, near the Piazza Del Popolo as it has large Roman Arch Gateways on both sides of the street.

The Villa Borghese Gardens in The Center of Rome is the Third Largest Public Garden of Rome after Villa Doria Pamphili and Villa Ada. This huge area coveres about 80 hectares (148 acres) and encompasses many Villas, Squares and Gardens and other points of attraction. This garden was built by architect Flaminio Ponzio fro a former vineyard to it's present size in 1605 as commissioned by notorious Borgia nephew (Pope Paul VI), Cardinal Scipione Borghese. The public garden has many places where the public can hang around and also view the famous attractions such as The Secret Gardens, Valley of Plain Trees, Piazza di Siena, the Temple of Diana, Villa Borghese, Villa Giulia, Villa Medici and Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna to name a few. You need at least two days to see all the attractions at this public park.

Opens: 24/7

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machomikemd
May 27, 2016

Third Largest Public Garden in Rome 1

The Villa Borghese Gardens in The Center of Rome is the Third Largest Public Garden of Rome after Villa Doria Pamphili and Villa Ada. This huge area coveres about 80 hectares (148 acres) and encompasses many Villas, Squares and Gardens and other points of attraction. This garden was built by architect Flaminio Ponzio fro a former vineyard to it's present size in 1605 as commissioned by notorious Borgia nephew (Pope Paul VI), Cardinal Scipione Borghese. The public garden has many places where the public can hang around and also view the famous attractions such as The Secret Gardens, Valley of Plain Trees, Piazza di Siena, the Temple of Diana, Villa Borghese, Villa Giulia, Villa Medici and Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna to name a few. You need at least two days to see all the attractions at this public park.

Opens: 24/7

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machomikemd
May 27, 2016
 
 
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A walk (bike or row) in the Park

If you go to Galleria Borghese (and even if you don’t) take some time to explore the great green spaces of Villa Borghese and the Pincio. A onetime vineyard turned private park developed by the same Cardinal Scipione who built the gallery, Villa Borghese became a fully public park in1903. It’s not the carefully tended variety you’d find, say, in England but still a nice way to escape the noise and crowds of the Centro Storico. Runners will find its wide paths perfect for getting in those morning miles, children will enjoy the zoo, carousel and puppet shows, and there are a few other good museums nearby. Bikes, pedal surreys and row boats - on a small artificial lake - are available for rent as well, and there are a couple of cafes scattered here and there for refueling.

There are multiple entrances but our favorite is the climb up the steps on the east side of Piazza del Popolo to the terrace at Pincio Gardens: nice view over the piazza and city from there. The Pincio (not officially part of Villa Borghese) anchors the west end of the combined park space and where you’ll find most of the recreational rentals and kid’s activities. You may also access this end of the park from the top of the Spanish Steps or from Via Vento, if you wish.

My one frustration with the park(s) is that there’s no comprehensive website for referencing all of the amenities so you sort of have to figure it out when you get there. A few maps are scattered throughout the grounds but I’d print out a google version of the general area before you go. Also be cautious of not confusing the park (Villa Borghese) with the art museum (Galleria Borghese) as visitors are apt to do.

Information about the two other museums (modern art and Etruscan) near, but not in, the north/northwest end of the park may be found here:

http://www.gnam.beniculturali.it/index.php?en/1/home

http://tinyurl.com/8e7ltec

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goodfish
Dec 31, 2014

A beautiful Sunday in the park

Villa Borghese is an estate originally built for Cardinal Scipione Borghese, the nephew of Pope Paul V, at the beginning of the 17th century. At the turn of the 20th century, the villa and its gardens became property of the Italian State. While the villa became a world-famous museum (Galleria Borghese, see my next tip), the gardens became a public park (so admission to these picturesque English-style gardens is free). With a circumference of about 6 km, the park includes a zoo and several galleries. It is beautifully landscaped, with plenty of fountains, statues (given me degree in literature, I especially enjoyed seeing those of Victor Hugo, Lord Byron and Goethe), an artificial lake and so on. I chose to explore the park on a warm and sunny Sunday, which was incredibly pleasant because the atmosphere was made all the better by the many locals who were out enjoying this beautiful day too. We got to see dogs playing in one of the park's fountain, kids playing and singing (see my little video), and an amazing accordionist playing classical music on Via del Museo Borghese (again, see my video!). The park is not that big, but I recommend dedicating an entire day to its visit (especially if you also plan on visiting the Galleria), so you don't have to limit yourself to its highlights but can actually walk down its numerous lanes, perhaps stop for lunch at one of its restaurants or cafes, and simply enjoy life in Rome for a day!

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Jefie
Nov 27, 2014

A Fresh Oasis

After four or five times in Rome, I must confess that I couldn't get time, yet, to visit the museum of Villa Borghese. But when I visited it with all the family and friends, after an exhaustive morning in the heat of August, we went to the park to rest a while.

The family took real profit of it, relaxing in the lawn, even refreshing the feet in water. I didn't stop for long, with such a beautiful park to see.

However, it was sufficiently reinvigorating, for an end of the day in the Roman Forum.

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solopes
Oct 02, 2014

PARK OF THE VILLA BORGHESE

I am not quite sure if the park in which the Villa Borghese is located is also called "Villa Borghese" park, but I can certainly advise to visit it. Although we (my husband and me) stayed in Rome only for three days, we decided to spend some two hours approximately in this park and we did not regret that we did not spend that time for some other things to be seen or done in Rome. On the contrary, we had a great time in that BEAUTIFUL PARK and I would suggest to everybody to have a walk in that park, which is, besides the Villa Borghese and Villa Medici and the Museum of modern art, full of beautiful monuments. It laso has a beautiful lake and, of course, beautiful flowers and green surfaces. We also enjoyed a wonderful cappuccino in one of the cafes in the park. The easiest way to reach it is from the Piazza del Popolo.

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Minceta
Oct 08, 2012
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"R O M E"
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breughel

"TO THE SOURCES OF MY CULTURE AND HISTORY."
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MM212

"Roma - Città Eterna"
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Villa Borghese, a Peaceful Refuge

Villa Borghese, a peaceful refuge from the hectic streets of Rome, features a lake, temples, fountains, statues and several museums. Located north of the Spanish Steps, the park has two main entrances, one at the Piazza del Popolo and the other at Porta Pinciana, where Via Veneto ends.

In the 16th century the land that is now Rome’s largest public park, began life as a vineyard. In 1605, Scipione Cardinal Borghese, a nephew of Pope Paul V, converted the vineyard into a park. Landscape architect Domenico Savino da Montepulciano designed a very formal park, with geometric flowerbeds and hedgerows, the first of its kind in Rome. A palazzo was built by architect Flaminio Ponzio, following a sketch made by the cardinal. The park was later designed along the English model, in a more natural way. At the end of the 18th century an artificial lake was created in the middle of the park. On the island in the lake, an small Ionic temple was built. It is dedicated to Aesculapius, the God of healing.

In 1903, the city of Rome bought Villa Borghese from the Borghese family and opened it to the public. The 148 acre park offered wide shady lanes, several temples, beautiful fountains and many statues. The World Exposition of 1911 was held in the Villa Borghese. Several of the national pavilions are still in use.

Sometimes called the ‘park of museums,’ the Villa Borghese is home to several museums. The most famous is Galleria Borghese, housed in the palazzo the cardinal designed. Its collection of sculptures by Antonio Canova and Gialorenzo Bernini and its collection of paintings include masters by Titian, Rubens and Raphael.

Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, with its collection of 19th and early 20th century paintings by Italian artists, is located on the grounds of the 1911 World Exposition. Not far from here is the Museo Nazionale Etrusco, a collection of Etruscan objects excavated around Rome. The museum is housed in the Villa Giulia, a villa built in 1550-1555 as the summer residence of Pope Julius III.

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von.otter
Sep 03, 2012

Villa Borghese

Designed in the 17th century for Cardinal Borghese, the gardens of Villa Borghese became a public park around 1900. The park is planted with the typically Roman umbrella pines and makes a beautiful shady escape from the city's summer heat. Within the park, there are a zoo, museums and art galleries, in addition to a number of statues of famous characters. The park extends from Piazza del Popolo to Via Veneto and further out.

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MM212
Nov 26, 2011

Villa Borghese - A quiet day away in the city.

The Villa Borghese is a large green area just to the north of the hectic centre of Rome. It is a welcome relief after several days of sightseeing, especially when it is hot!

There are a few cafes dotted around the park or you can of course just bring your own food and drink and sit down and relax with a picnic by the lake.

The layout of the park is fairly formal and dotted with various sculptures. There is also a lake with a mock greek style temple (Temple of Aesculapius) on it which (for us at least) formed a sort of focal point of the park. The lake was also well populated with ducks (of course) and tortoises (more interesting).

There are a few sights in and around the park as well. the Villa Giulia is home to the etruscan museum and we found very interesting - see my review of this for more details. Far more famously is the Galleria Borghese which we did not visit but I understand you have to book in advance to go inside. Opposite the northern entrance to the park near Piazza Thorvaldsen is the Galleria Nazionale D'Arte Moderne. There is also a zoo within the green area of the park's boundaries.

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zadunajska8
Nov 04, 2011

The Gardens of Villa Borghese

These extensive gardens cover 148 acres on the Monte Pincio hill, and are easily accessible on foot from central Rome.
They were laid by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in the 17th century, but the present layout dates from the 19th century.

In the park you can find shaded paths, with the beautiful pines of Rome, a lake, a zoo and several villas and museums: Galleria Borghese, Villa Medici, Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia, Museo Carlo Bilotti, National Gallery of Modern Art. Some of these date back to the 17th century, and some have remained from the Rome world exposition in 1911.

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iblatt
Oct 07, 2011

Things to Do Near Villa Borghese

Things to Do

Villa Medici

The famous Villa Medici in Piazza della Trinita Monti was formerly the house in Rome of the Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany (and part of the Medici Clan who is famous for the...
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Pincio

The first time I climbed to the Pincio terrace I found it wonderful that there was not a single skyscraper, not a single tower, not a single high building at the horizon. No architectural injury was...
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Bioparco di Roma

As we were travelling with our 2 years old child, visiting the Zoo was a "must do" activity :) It was convenient for us that the zoo is situated almost in the city center. They call it actually...
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Galleria Borghese - Museum

Art lovers, if you have time to visit only one museum, this is the one... especially if you’re allergic to crowds. Galleria Borghese’s 22 rooms display works by some of the Italy's greatest geniuses...
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Basilica Santa Maria del Popolo

The church of Santa Maria del Popolo, where in Angels and Demons Robert Langdon goes to look for the "hole of the Devil", was built initially from a small chapel built by Pope Paschal II. Why that...
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Via Veneto

Via Veneto is one of the city's most famous and elegant streets. Ever since the Barberini family built its palazzo at the bottom of the street in the 17th century, the area became home to wealthy...
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Getting to Villa Borghese

Address

Via Aldrovandi, Via Raimondi (2 entries), Via Pinciana (2 entries), Piazzale Sao Paulo, Piazzale Flaminio Square Cervantes, Rome Italy

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