More Getting Around Rome

  • Metro - Subway
    by goodfish
  • Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport
    Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport
    by Jefie
  • In the VIP lounge of FCO Airport
    In the VIP lounge of FCO Airport
    by Jefie

Most Viewed Transportation in Rome

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Terravision bus to/ from Ciampino

    by leics Updated Feb 25, 2016

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ciampino airport is used by many European budget carriers, and by some charter flights as well. So it may be that you will fly into Ciampino rather than Rome's main airport, Fiumicino.

    Both airports are pretty close to the city and transport is easy.

    It's worth using the Terravision bus to and from Ciampino airport, especially if it's your first time in Rome. They have a stand in the arrivals hall and there are frequent services during the day. Terravision buses drop you off on Via Marsala next to Termini station, convenient for everywhere in Rome via bus, Metro or taxi. They collect from the drop-off point.

    I prefer to book my ticket in advance on the Terravision website although you can buy tickets on arrival. People with online bookings have priority when it comes to boarding. They don't necessarily get on first, but a seat is reserved for them.

    On your return you must go into the 'Terracafe' which is directly opposite the Terravision bus stop, to collect your 'boarding card'. You must go at least 20 minutes before departure and, as I found out, going the day before or even 2 hours before just doesn't work! You won't get the boarding card. Fortunately, my hotel was only 3 minutes' walk from the stop so there was no problem for me to go back at the 'right' time.

    I walked past the Terracafe twice a day for 3 days and noticed quite long queues (it was July, so very busy). Do make sure you allow time to get your boarding card.

    And do book a bus which allows you plenty of time before check-in. Terravision say the journey will take 40 minutes (in fact, my journey took less than 30 minutes in both directions) but that is because they know about Rome traffic. Traffic can be very congested indeed and, if there is an accident or something else unusual, even Terravision buses will get stuck in traffic jams.

    It's always a good idea to get to airports 2 hours before departure, and Ciampino was very busy when I flew out, with long queues at security. So I suggest you catch the bus 3 hours before departure.

    The Sitbus shuttle also operates Ciampino and Fiumicino>Termini. I have not used it, because it drops you off at a slightly less convenient location near Termini (imo). But my friend used it from Fiumicino and was very satisfied.

    http://www.sitbusshuttle.com/

    Terravision bus Rome from the Palatine Terracafe Terracafe and queue
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  • Worst Public Transportation System in Europe

    by Kdu Updated Apr 26, 2015

    Expect to be groped and spat on while riding the overcrowded buses in Rome. Yes, an Italian man spit in my face because he felt we were taking up too much space and then my two friends were groped by two different men on the same bus. And don't expect fellow passengers to assist. None came to our assistance.

    Overcrowded buses are a management problem and lead to crimes of this type. Public transportation is mismanaged and corrupt in this beautiful city. We felt fortunate that we were not pick-pocketed.

    Lastly, what kind of culture condones this type of behavior?

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    By metro, bus and tram.

    by Maurizioago Updated Feb 15, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rome has two underground lines. Both lines (blue and red line) crosses each other at Termini (see Termini train station) tube station. The blue line runs from Rebibbia to Laurentina and includes stops near EUR, St. Paul Outside the Walls, Piramide, Colosseum and so on. The red line runs from Battistini to Anagnina. It includes stops near the Vatican Museums (Cipro), the Vatican (Ottaviano), Piazza del Popolo (Flaminio) and so on.

    Metro lines run from 5.30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. (12.30 p.m. on saturdays).

    Public buses in Rome run from about 5.30 to midnight daily. There are night buses that run all night as well.

    The major bus terminus is in front of Termini train station.

    Here are some useful bus lines;

    64 Termini – piazza Venezia – piazza San Pietro.

    75 Termini – Colosseo.

    H piazza Venezia – Trastevere.

    Tickets are sold at newspapers' stands, tobacco shops and from the vending machines at all stations. There are several kinds of tickets. BIT (biglietto integrato a tempo) is valid for 100 minutes once you stamped it. You can use this for one ride (only) by metro and as many rides as you like on buses and trams. BIG (biglietto integrato giornaliero) is valid for 24 hours after you stamped it. This is valid for unlimited rides by buses, trams and the metro until midnight of the day it was stamped.

    You have to validate your ticket into a machine when you are inside a bus or a tram.

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  • travelgourmet's Profile Photo

    E20 for Roma trambus 110 Open

    by travelgourmet Updated Jul 28, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Only E20 for one day ticket (24 hour validity) of transportation around the sights of Rome. The Roma 110 open is a Tourist line open top deck trambus that circles the city and has 12 stops that are ideal for most major sites in Rome. The stops are quick except at Termini which is the train station but then it is only a short time till you are on your way. The Route Map will show where the bus goes and stops. The stops are: Termini, Coliseum, Circus Maximus, Mouth of Truth, Piazza Venezia, St. Peter, Ara Pacis, Trevi Fountain, Villa Borghese, Barberini, and back to Termini. Every ten minutes in high season, 20 minutes in off season, there is a 110 open at each stop.

    You can get on and off to visit sites such as the Colosseum, the Spanish Steps, etc. Start early in the morning and hop on and off at the stops you wish to visit. A full audio headset in 8 languages is included to listen to what the 110 is either going by or the next stop. Great for beginners to see the sights and great for those who can't walk for long distances. The 110 sign is up at the locations to help you wait for the next bright red trambus and you pay as you get on, no matter which stop. Have fun! Take the Roma Trambus 110 Open.

    The View from the Top Time to Hop On the Roma Trambus 110 Open San Pietro, Saint Peter Colosseo, The Roman Coliseum Termini,  Train Station and Roma Trambus 110 Open
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  • travelgourmet's Profile Photo

    LEAVE THE DRIVING TO SANDRO

    by travelgourmet Updated Apr 8, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Autonoleggio con autista (car rental with driver), is an easy and stress free way of getting to and from the airport in Rome or to and from the port, Civitavecchia, in Rome. My wife and I scheduled Roma Limousine for a driver with a Mercedes ( they also have vans and limousines) to pick us up at the airport and take us to our hotel in Roma. We also used the same driver to take us to the port, so we could take a cruise five days later.

    Sandro, our driver, is the son of the owner of the company, ROMA LIMOUSINE, and he was not only an excellent driver but quite fluent in English, as he worked in New York for a while and now lives part timein Maimi. He not only drives to locations but you can hire him out for sight-seeing and tours. One of the perks is that he is willing to stop for a break of espresso or a bite to eat while enroute to your destination.

    Both my wife and I highly recommend Roma Limousine for the relaxed way to get to and from and out and about in Rome. Sandro gives a great overview tour of Roma and stops at the sites you want to visit and a few of his own best of Roma sites. Yes, it is much more expensive than the train and about the same as a taxi, but the service of pick up and helping out, as well as a well spoken driver like Sandro who knows the area backwards and in English, was a welcome relief to help us have a carefree time in Rome and not miss the boat or plane. No walking here or carrying heavy luggage to and from trains or taxis. Only the finest care and service, we will call on Sandro on our next return to beautiful Italy. We did return and not only used RomaLimo for ourselves, we also sent a couple of friends travelling through Rome to visit my wife and me needing to get to FCO via RomaLimo, Roma to FCO on the last minute call. Grazie to Sandro. If you use Sandro, please tell him travelgourmet / "Larry and Sue from California" say hello. Ciao

    SANDRO AT YOUR BECK AND CALL BREAK TIME IN ROMA
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    How to get to Rome from Pisa

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 30, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our bus tour around Italy started in Mestre (continental part of Venice), continued in Verona, Florence and Pisa.
    Rome was our next Italian attraction.
    We got to Rome by bus from Pisa. The total distance is about 400 km (6 hours in the way). We started by A12 (E80).
    I occupied a seat at the window and was taking a video.

    You can watch my 2 min 04 sec Video Pisa-Rome out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    From Pisa to Rome
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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Moving around Rome when you get tired of walking..

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Jun 27, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The public transportation system is fairly efficient and connects you to most zones in town. The best way to move around is by bus & metro (this latter having only 2 lines: A & B, although they are currently building Line C which should be ready by 2012); besides, there are metropolitan trains that take you farther than the metro (if you need to move far from downtown) and are included in the metro/bus fare system (i.e. you don't have to pay extra to ride them, you can do it with a normal ticket as long as you don't leave Rome's suburban limits; if you do, an extra fee applies).

    There are tickets that are valid for 75 minutes (used to be 90 mins. several years ago), a whole day, a week or a month. Buy the one that suits you better according to the time you'll be staying there: the longer the validity, the cheaper they are (a weekly ticket was 24,000 lire [about 12 US dollars], a monthly ticket used to be 50,000 lire [25 USD]; you can get these tickets with a discount if you're a student or a senior citizen). The 1-day tickets are not really worthwhile buying unless you'll be in Rome for a very short period and plan to use the metro/buses several times a day, which in Rome isn't really necessary. There were some days when I would not ride a bus or the metro even once, sometimes 2-3 times, but of course that also depends on how far you're from the touristic sites and how much time you have available. In a case like mine it's better to buy single (1-trip) tickets. You can buy them at most newsstands or metro stations, and make sure you buy AND VALID them before riding either the buses or the metro/trains (there are machines at the entrance of the metro stations or the buses). Night buses are also very efficient and take you to the main spots around the city between midnight and 5 AM. However, Rome is very worth seeing by walking around its little streets, squares, monuments....

    NOTE 1: The prices mentioned above are in Euros now, but the US Dollar reference I posted can give you an idea of what the prices were like a few years ago..... The current price (2011) for a single trip ticket - which is the only one I used this time so I can't tell what the other tickets cost - is: 1 EUR per ticket, valid for 75 mins OR one metro ride (i.e. you can transfer bus-to-bus or metro-to-bus freely within the 75 mins. but you cannot use the metro more than once with the same ticket: you can transfer between lines but you can't go out and then back in).

    NOTE 2: I don't know if there's a website where you can see all of the bus routes in Rome, but I've always found my way around Rome by just looking for a bus stop (pic. no. 3) and trying to find the place/stop where I need to go and the number of the bus that will take me there. Sometimes not even bus drivers are very keen in bus routes different than the ones they work on, so it's a bit tricky to ask them.... better just try to find your way or ask someone on the street!

    Also, there are now automatic ticket machines in many spots (eg. Termini, Teatro Marcello close to Foro Romano/Musei Capitolini, Piazza Risorgimento near the Vatican) where you can buy your tickets without having to go to a metro station or a newsstand or shop. I found this really cool and convenient!! Picture of the machine on photo no. 2 of this tip!

    Map of the metro & trains of Rome Metro/bus ticket machine Teatro Marcello bus stop
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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Getting to the Eternal City

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Oct 17, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    How did I get there?? Well, since I live in Mexico I had no other choice but to get there by plane, as many of you will have to do as well :) The Fiumicino airport is about half an hour from the town, but there's the Leonardo Express train that takes you from the airport to Termini train/metro station (near downtown Rome and with lots of bus terminals) which run every half an hour and are very efficient & comfortable, and PUNCTUAL too! That is not very usual in the Roman (or rather Italian) transportation system ;) In fact on my very last trip I was able to catch a train only because it was running late.... but it's not the norm. However, keep in mind that after 9 PM (or maybe earlier) there's no one to buy the train tickets from at the airport terminal (outrageous, in my opinion) so you will have to get your ticket from a vending machine which does NOT take cash, only credit cards...!!!

    If you're arriving from somewhere else in Europe, you may arrive at the Ciampino airport...... this one is small but still well furnished and organized, and you can get from the airport to Termini by bus+metro (take a COTRAL bus to the Anagnina metro station and then use the metro red line: it's about 13 stations from Anagnina to Termini). Same way if you want to go to the airport from Rome.

    Nowadays there's another good alternative: there are shuttles that take you directly to Termini (by Via Marsala) from both airports and viceversa. I used the Terravision shuttle this time to go from Termini to the Fiumicino airport and I was very pleased with the service and the price.... Only 6 EUR for a one-way ticket (the Leonardo Express costs 14 EUR for a single ride)! The journey takes about 40-50 minutes but the buses are very punctual and they run very often; they are comfortable too. You can buy your tickets in advance and the staff will tell you which buses/times are more convenient for you to catch your flight on time. They usually allow for 3 hours before your flight in order to avoid any potential delays, but of course you can ride them closer to the departing time, under your own risk. You can also show up any time and just buy your ticket for the next available bus. They have a small office/lounge attached to the Termini station (next to the Despar supermarket) where they have internet access, a small cafeteria and tables & chairs for you to wait until your bus departs. This is where the bus schedules are displayed and where the tickets are sold.

    If you travel by train you will most probably arrive into the Termini central train station, too. It's really huge and it connects Rome with most part of Italy and other destinations!

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  • griffiths1971's Profile Photo

    Green Line Tours - Shuttle Bus Tour of the City

    by griffiths1971 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We used Green Line Tours, a shuttle bus around the city, which we could hop on and off, tickets were £14 and valid for a 24 hour period. The office is located a few minutes walk from the Termini Railway Station in Rome, and just off via Cavour.

    Frequent departures from 9:30am - 6:30pm

    Itinerary:
    The Shuttle tour will stop near the following places of interest. The letter in brackets refers to the relevant bus stop:

    Terminal Via Farini 5A (A)
    Fontana di Trevi / Piazza Spagna Via del Traforo 132 (B)
    Via Veneto / Via Vittorio Veneto 27 (C)
    Villa Borghese / Piazza delle Canestre (D)
    Vaticano / Via della Conciliazione 4 (E)
    Piazza Navona / Pantheon / Corso Vittorio Emanuele 178 (F)
    Piazza Venezia / Piazza Venezia 3 (G)
    Bocca delle Verità/Circo Massimo / Via della Greca 11 (H)
    Colosseo Via San Gregorio 30 (I)

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    Taking the Train

    by Marpessa Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    While in Italy I travelled from city to city on the trains - Trenitalia. I used both the Inter City trains and the Eurostar. The Eurostar trains get between destinations faster (as they have fewer stops) and in general are kept in better condition than the Inter City ones. The trains I went on had either restaurant cars or snack bars on board.

    To get to Rome I came by train from Milan - an Inter City train - this took me 6 hours. Next time I think I would take the Eurostar - which only takes 4.5 hours. After leaving Rome I took a Eurostar train to Florence - a much nicer way to travel!

    I had a railpass when I was in Italy, which was very handy. Although on some trips when I wanted to book a seat I had to pay a few euro extra - but it was either that or run the risk of standing up for a few hours. If you plan on doing a bit of train traveling while in Italy, I recommend getting a rail pass as this can save you money.

    The website below is very helpful, you can look up timetables of the trains, prices and even book your tickets online.

    Warning: Just beware at Roma Termini of people coming up and asking for your change (I had a lady stick her hands in my face) or people who are just standing around the station trying to sell you their tickets - it's most likely not legit.

    Trenitalia
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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Sciopero!

    by baronedivandastad Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sciopero, or strike, is the nightmare of the tourist in Italy, and especially in cities like Rome where people don't find driving too comfortable (I disagree - driving in Rome is an excellent experience, but that's the subject of another tip).
    A bit of planning can avoid the inconveniences of a strike. In particular, the Italian Ministry of Infrastructure has a good website where all the planned strikes are listed. The website (in Italian) is continuously updated. And before you say anything, I'll admit: strikes are pretty much the only well-planned thing in Italy.

    Roads won't be this empty on a strike day.

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  • aaaarrgh's Profile Photo

    'Enjoy Rome' by Bike

    by aaaarrgh Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    "Enjoy Rome" are an Englidh speaking company that provide useful help and tips for visitors to Rome.

    They also organise an exceedingly good bicycle tour of the city. You experience the city in the fresh air, covering larger distances than you could do on foot. And you meet a large group of like-minded travellers too.

    The tour lasts three hours! It takes you through the parks of the Villa Borgese, Piazza del Popolo, stops at the Mouth of Truth, heads out for the Colloseum, then back past the ruins of the Forum.

    Bike and bike helmets included in the price. I paid in lira but now Italy use the euro, the price is €20.

    Nice people to know
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  • stressball's Profile Photo

    Getting into Rome form Ciampino Airport

    by stressball Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There are several ways to get into Rome from Ciampino Airport. The cheapest way to go is by bus and metro....

    When you leave the airport, walk across the street to your left and there is a bus stop for the Schiaffini buses (also Cotral). These buses cost 1 euro and will take you to Aganina station in about 30 minutes.

    From Aganina station, you can take the metro to your destination.

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  • stiriano's Profile Photo

    Night Busses

    by stiriano Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    All major night busses cross the place in front of the Termini station. The busses are leaving every 30 min. If your are not in the centro storico it's better to take the night busses than to take a taxi. Especially on Satturdays you have to wait for a long time for taxis!

    You can buy tickets from the driver which isn't possible on day busses.

    To download the pdf-file whit all lines click on the link.

    40 Notturno
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  • mccalpin's Profile Photo

    Handicap Access - Rome and trains

    by mccalpin Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is a note I posted on a forum on handicap access from Leonardo da Vinci to Civitavecchia:

    First, how to get from the airport (Leonardo da Vinci, or "Fiumicino" as the locals call it (from the town that it is in)) to Civitavecchia:
    1. At the airport itself, take the train to Stazione Termini (Rome's main train station)
    2. At Stazione Termini, take one of many trains to Civitavecchia (about an hour ride, I think).
    3. At Civitavecchia, take a taxi to the port - actually, I am told that the distance is not far, but for anyone travelling with luggage, much less a handicap, why not take a cab?

    OK?

    For the airport, look at http://www.adr.it/content.asp?L=3&IdMen=630 . At the bottom of the page is a link for "special assistance" and lists locations of lounges for special needs. One of them is at the train station in the airport. Note that I recently emailed a question to the redazione@adr.it (editorial staff for the website), and I got an answer within a day(!!!), so you might try, too.

    For the Italian train system, I have found two pages, but, unfortunately (perhaps), they are only in Italian. The page for wheelchair-bound people is http://62.110.170.238/disabili/viSed.html, while a list of offices to contact is at http://62.110.170.238/disabili/hodi.html . In any case, it is clear that some trains, at least, are able to handle wheelchair bound passengers, and major stations can use lifts to load the passengers. Your travel agent should be able to use this information to get more specifics.

    Also, if you're in Rome a while, there is a page by ATAC (Rome's bus system) on handicapped access - see http://www.atac.roma.it/disabili/index.asp?A=3&S=36&lng=2 - this is in English.

    Related to:
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