More Getting Around Rome

  • Metro - Subway
    by goodfish
  • Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport
    Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport
    by Jefie
  • In the VIP lounge of FCO Airport
    In the VIP lounge of FCO Airport
    by Jefie

Most Viewed Transportation in Rome

  • gasca's Profile Photo

    Stazione Termini - Leonardo Express

    by gasca Written Nov 7, 2005

    The best (and the only) way to get to the city is with Leonardo Express train.

    It takes half an hour without any stops, it costs 9.5 Euros (nov-05) and it leaves every ten minutes or so.

    You can buy tickets on machines or at the man standing next to the platform.

    Platorms are 25-29 and you have to walk 10 minutes to get to the platforms when you leave the city.

    Stazione Termini
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  • gasca's Profile Photo

    Metro & Bus In Rome

    by gasca Written Nov 6, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are 2 metro lines in Rome, Line A and Line B , none of them go to the center, so probably you'll have a long way back if you walk around Centro Storico , and knowing some bus lines will be quite useful.

    Bus 40 - From Stazione Termini to Vatican (Castel Sant'Angello)

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  • alisonr's Profile Photo

    Get smart!

    by alisonr Written Oct 27, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These tiny little babies are all throughout Italy and France. They are great! Especially that they are Smart becuase (I think) they are 1/2 electric and 1/2 petrol. So good for parking and the environment too! Just watch out for them while crossing the street!

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    Taxi

    by Marpessa Written Oct 24, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I only used a taxi service once while in Rome, because I was out at night and didn’t want to walk near Roma Termini in the dark on my own. I was worried it was going to cost me a lot. But a trip that took me about 7mins cost me around 6€, I think. My driver was really nice, she didn’t speak much English, but I was able to give her the address of my hostel and she did take the shortest route there (was worried I might have been taken ‘the long way round’ – but no, not in this case :) ). Taxi’s are very comfortable and the cars I saw all looked pretty new. Only use the ‘official taxi’s’ – they should be white cars with a taxi sign on the roof.

    Also there is an extra fee (surcharge) for taking a taxi between 10pm and 7am, and also a fee baggage (suitcases, etc.).

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    Bus

    by Marpessa Written Oct 24, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    By bus is a good way to travel in Rome (although I only traveled this way twice, so I am not an expert), I liked it better than the metro. The main bus terminal is right in front of the main train station – Roma Termini. When I went with my friends we bought tickets that lasted for 75 minutes and cost us 1€. But just be sure that when you get on the bus that you validate your ticket. If it is not validated you make get a fine if it is checked.

    Buses run from early in the morning until around midnight – but in some areas there are night buses as well. Check out the website below for more information on different types of tickets, and the different routes that the buses travel along.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    The Metro

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 16, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I found Rome's metro system to be fairly clean, cheap and not that crowded if travelling outside of peak hours. The metro in Rome only has 2 lines: Line A runs from Battistini to Anagnina through stations such as Cipro Musei Vaticani for the Vatican Museum and Spagna for the Spanish Steps. Line B runs from Rebibbia to Laurentina through stations such as Colosseo for the Colosseum. Both lines converge at Stazione Termini, the city's central railway station. Unfortunately, both lines don't go anywhere near Piazza Navona or the Pantheon areas. The types of ticket are:

    BIT - Timed ticket which lasts for 75 mins after validation. Can only be used on the line purchased on. Costs € 1,00.
    BIG - Integrated daily ticket which lasts upto midnight and must be validated. Can only be used on the line purchased on. Costs € 4,00.
    BTI - Integrated tourist ticket which lasts for 3 days and must be date stamped before first journey. Costs € 11,00.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Buses of Rome

    by codrutz Updated Sep 15, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tip: Find a map of Rome that shows clearly the routes of the buses! Most of the maps that you will find in Rome shows the metro system, that is pretty easy to usem because there are only two lines, A and B. But buses are another thing. I had two maps and neither showed the routes of the bus, but only if you made some difficult search which takes time. Though after you find the desired bus, the rides aren't so smooth like lets say in Paris, because the streets are pretty uneven and the ride are very bumpy. You should though take the 115 bus to the Janicullum hill in Trastevere. 115 and 116 are electric buses and they aren't use by locals because they move to slow, so they are like a tour bus you can ride with only 1 eur (the cost of a normal ticket).

    Bus 115 in Rome

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  • fairy_dust's Profile Photo

    Flying over

    by fairy_dust Written Sep 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We flew over to Rome. We had Air Canada from Montreal to Frankfurt, then Alitalia from there to Rome. The flight is a few hours and on the way over, we saw the Alps out the plane window while we were flying over the mountains.

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  • huwhit's Profile Photo

    RoMetro

    by huwhit Written Sep 2, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rome is home to an extensive Metro system that makes getting around the Capital quite easy.

    With stations at pretty much all tourist destinations (when walking out of Colloseo Station, the confronting view of the Coliseum is incredible) it can mean quick and safe travel.

    Don't take the Metro if you want to see the streets around you whilst you travel, however, traffic in Rome is notoriously bad.

    You can purchase a day ticket for under 5 euros which is pretty damn good value.

    The RoMetro looks after people who do need a seat!
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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Moving in Rome if you're disabled

    by baronedivandastad Written Aug 10, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I thought I'd share a few tips for people that have difficulties in moving, for instance if they are disabled..

    Most (but not all) buses are of the new, low-floor, disabled-friendly type, so they shouldn't be a problem. Also, on all buses there will be one or two seats that are reserved for disabled people (and usually the other passengers won't hesitate to help and give up their seats).

    The metro is another thing: if you can manage escalators then it's fine, otherwise not all stations have lifts. The stations with easy access for disabled people are marked on underground maps.

    Trams can be new or old. The new ones have good access, the old ones I honestly don't remember (they only run on line 3, and I seldom take it).

    With trains you will usually have a problem as most stations are built so that you have to climb three steep steps to get on. However, in larger stations you can get the station personnel to help you (e.g. by lifting your wheelchair).

    For airports, there is total assistance, so you should be ok wherever you go.

    Related to:
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  • siso010's Profile Photo

    FCO Airport.!

    by siso010 Written Aug 1, 2005

    Once you get off your flight and took you luggage just go out the airport you will find a tunnel like a bridge pass it from inside so you are in the train station.!
    take the train it will get you off in Termini station "The main station".
    it costs 9 euros for the trip and it takes 35 minutes to arrive to Termini.
    there is a train getting off every 30 min.

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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Things you should beware of

    by baronedivandastad Written Jul 14, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most dangerous things on the roman roads are scooters. The larger these are, the more treacherous they are, since their drivers tend to consider them as bicycles, but they have the size of a small lorry.

    The second most dangerous things are Smart cars (those ugly two-seaters made by Mercedes and Swatch, which tend to be driven by bimbos and teenagers with more gel on the head than brain inside).

    The third most dangerous things are pedestrians who don't follow my previous tip on walking rules and do one of the following: suddenly start crossing very fast, then stop two metres away from the pavement; start crossing then back off; start crossing slowly without looking; then start running when they see a car approaching; start crossing outside the zebras (they are indeed very important); start crossing, then answer the mobile phone or (even worse) start texting their friends, looking for their lost mates, search a lipstick in their bag, and so on.

    This is a pedestrian area, so beware of drunkards!

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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Walking rules

    by baronedivandastad Written Jul 14, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A city with 2.3 million cars deserves a walking tip. While most of Rome's centre is pedestrianized, you'll occasionally have to cross a street with lots of traffic. Here's a couple of useful rules.

    1) Remember that 90% of traffic deaths and injuries come from pedestrians, and take care.

    2) Find the nearest zebras or traffic lights, then start crossing with moderate and constant speed, always looking to the forthcoming driver (there'll be one). Don't wait for drivers to stop, just walk ahead and don't panic: they will.

    3) If you don't feel safe crossing at some point, walk ahead or back a few hundred meters, and you'll most probably find zebras or at least a place with better visibility.

    4) Follow the flow, do as the Romans do.

    If you spot this car, you're safe: it's mine.
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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Driving rules

    by baronedivandastad Written Jul 14, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1) Don't be stressed by vehicles of lower size, they'll take care of themselves.

    2) When negotiating a crossing that looks too messy (such as the one between Via di Decima and Via Colombo, a real masterpiece of demential engineering), go slowly forward and be prapared to brake suddenly in case your neighbours happen to have a different opinions over priorities.

    3) if you need to do something stupid (like a U-turn in a jammed road) because you got lost or took the wrong way, make sure you signal your intentions. Roman drivers are very tolerant of stupid manoeuvres (they see hundreds of them every day) and will not honk too much.

    4) follow the flow, do as the Romans do.

    Trapped!
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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Driving (and walking) rules

    by baronedivandastad Written Jul 14, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you happen to have to drive around Rome, please remember that it's not that big nightmare as people depict it. Millions of drivers negotiate the streets of our capital every day, and very few of them actually die or experience serious damage to either themselves or their cars.

    Actually I'll go even further: I hereby claim that Italy (and especially Rome) has the most civilized driving habits on Earth.

    Before you start storming VT with angry replies, hear this: among the large countries, Italy has the highest car density in the world. If you decided to put all the cars in Rome on the street at the same time, you'd be disappointed to find out that they would not fit. Yet, you see very few accidents, and most of those are due to scooters, careless pedestrians (usually tourists) and bad road condition.

    So you'll want to know how to drive (or walk) around when in Rome. Since VT does not allow me to put them all in a single tip, I'll produce several tips, one for each rule category.

    Spotted this plate in Lido di Ostia.
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