Castello District - Sestiere Castello, Venice

38 Reviews

  • Chiesa di San Zaccaria
    Chiesa di San Zaccaria
    by machomikemd
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    Chiesa della Pieta' o di Vivaldi...
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    Saliza S. Provolo Street
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    Riva degli Schiavoni

    by suvanki Updated Oct 7, 2010

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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - SAN ZACCARIA / SAN MARCO (VALLARESSO)

    Crossing over Ponte della Paglia, having taken your photo of The Bridge of Sighs, you arrive onto Riva degli Schiavoni - The Dalmations Quay.

    (We have left San Marco sestieri (one of the 6 neighbourhoods of Venice) and are now in Castello sestieri - If You're ever unsure where You are in Venice, the street signs also name the Sestieri - and Yellow signs point to San Marco, Rialto Bridge and other main landmarks)

    The name comes from Schiavone-the Italian word for Slav, which in Venice was linked to the word slave. Slave trading was a common occurance in the early life of the city. Most slaves arrived from Dalmatian coastal towns.
    Many of these Slavs were Christian, or converted to the faith, so by the 11th century, the slave trade in Venice ended.

    The quayside, became the location where merchant ships from the ports of the Mediterranean, Adriatic, and further afield unloaded their goods. Food was sold from their boats, or booths set up along the quayside. There were also quite a few inns just beyond the bridge.

    In ancient times, the Riva degli Schiavoni was partly walled-as a defense from invasion.

    It was such an important transit port, that the area had to be widened , as it was only the width of its bridges. It was paved in 1324, then widened between 1780-82 by the architect Tommaso Temanza, to accommodate the increasingly busy trade.

    Apparently a white stone border marks the original boundary. Canaletto's drawings of the Riva during the 1740's and 1750s show an area busy with gondolas, barges and sailing boats.

    The Riva has been one of Venices highly desired addresses, with Petrarch in 1362 (No. 4145) and Henry James (No 4161) residing here. The Hotel Danieli (No 4196) has boasted Dickens, Proust, Wagner and Ruskin as guests. Today it welcomes guests willing to part with 700 Euros for its cheaper rooms - 900 Euro with a lagoon view!

    Nowadays, this popular promenade still continues its trading history, although this time through the many gift shops and souvenir stalls.

    There are also Exchange bureaus, and snack stalls, and You'll no doubt encounter a multitude of street entertainers along your stroll.

    This is a pleasant area to stroll at dusk, as the sun sets over the water.

    For those preferring a longer walk, and to see some of Venice's less visited areas, with views across the water -

    The Riva stretches along the Bacino di San Marco from the Ducal Palace to the Rio Ca'di Dio near the Arsenale Vaporetto stop. Here, the promenade changes its name to Riva Ca' di Dio, until the bridge crossing the Rio dell' Arsenale. The section in front of the Naval museum is The Riva S Biagio, crossing the next bridge you are then on Riva dei Sette Martiri, which is a longer promenade, stretching to near the Giardini Vaporetto stop. Continuing in front of the Giardini Pubblici along the Viale del Giardini Pubblici, then crossing the bridge, you'll find yourself in Sant' Elena at the easternmost end of Venice.

    Address: Riva degli Schiavani,Castello Venice

    Directions: Vaporetto - SAN ZACCARIA

    Riva Degli Schiavoni Venice Riva Degli Schiavoni Venice
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    Calle delle Rasse and Hotel Danieli

    by suvanki Updated Oct 7, 2010

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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - SAN ZACCARIA

    Retracing your steps along the Riva degli Schiavoni, look for the Hotel Danieli. This is the largest and possibly one of the most famous hotels in Venice, and one of the top hotels in the world.

    Originally built as a Palace for the ducal Dandolo family in the 14th century, it became a hotel in 1822, named after its owner Joseph Da Niel. Newer wings were added in the 1940's Apparently its opulent interior is crammed with marble, stained glass, crystal chandeliers, silk covered walls, gilt mirrors and oriental carpets. It also has the uninterrupted view over the lagoon - but this comes with the accompanying noise from the pavement below!

    Between the 2 buildings of the hotel is a narrow street, Calle delle Rasse. Walking along here, you'll see many fish restaurants, bars and shops. When I visited at Christmas, small twinkling white lights decorated the street.

    This street was originally a hive of industry- Rasse (Rascia or Rassa) was a black strong canvas- like material, (or a woolen cloth) that was used to cover the gondolas, to protect their ornate furnishings and fabrics. It originated in Servia (Rascia)
    So manufacturing, selling and sewing of this material took place all along the street, and led to its name.

    Doge Vitale Michiel 1 was murdered by Marco Cassuolo at the entrance to this Calle on September 13th 1102, while he was on his way to pay his traditional annual visit to the nearby church of San Zaccaria.
    Cassuolo, was caught, after attempting to hide in one of the nearby houses at the Calles entrance, and hung.
    These houses were then destroyed. They were rebuilt, but not permitted to be constructed in stone. They were then destroyed to enable the extension of the Hotel Danieli.

    Apparently, Doge Vitale Michiel 11 was also murdered near this Calle, again on his way to San Zaccaria on 27th March 1172 - an Easter visit!! Hmmmm....

    Don't worry, the worst that is likely to happen today is that you'll be accosted by street entertainers along this route!!!

    Address: Calle delle Rasse, Castello, Venice

    Directions: Vaporetto SAN ZACCARIA

    Calle delle Rasse street sign
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    Campo San Zanipolo, one of my favourite campi

    by Trekki Updated Nov 24, 2015

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    Of all the campi in Venice I saw and sat for a while Campo San Zanipolo was my favourite. Ok, this was easy because I stayed around the corner in an apartment for the major part of my 12 days in 2007. I still don’t know why I liked it so much – maybe it was partly because of the hospital and the busy coming and going of people, maybe the cafes, restaurants and bácari. But maybe also because one of the best cafes in Venice is located here, Rosa Salva. They make really good cakes and pastries and the coffee smells and tastes divine. And then of course Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolowith mass service. Consequently, on weekends the campo is full with real Veneziano life – just perfect.

    In the middle of the campo sits the very prominent equestrian statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni (photos 2 and 3). This sculpture is famous in several aspects: it is one of the first bronze statues of that size built at that time (15th century) and even John Ruskin believed that there is no more glorious work of sculpture in this world. And then you might ask how does such a large and heavy statue can get into a town dominated by canals? There is an interesting and funny story behind this. Colleoni was one of Venezia’s most famous condottiere, leaders of armed forces, on terra firma back in mid 15th century. In his testament he promised to donate a large sum to Venezia, if he would get immortality through a monument in front of San Marco. But the Venetians had problems with this, especially since he was not a native but from Bergamo. But then they thought smart and read the testament again very carefully. It did not specifically say “in front of the basilica San Marco” but just “in front of San Marco”. So his statue was placed indeed in front of San Marco, but of the Scuola di San Marco. So the testament was fulfilled and the city could claim the money.

    Vaporetto stop: Ospedale Civile, line 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Address: Campo San Zanipolo, Venezia

    Very nice water well on Campo Zanipolo Bartolomeo Colleoni on his horse Bartolomeo Colleoni on his horse
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    Amazing façade of Scuola di San Marco

    by Trekki Updated Jun 23, 2015

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    Brotherhoods or scuole played a major role in Venezia’s past. They often had the most marvellous buildings and a lot of money. One of these scuole is or better was Scuola Grande di San Marco, the building is still there with a marvellous southern façade. Those of you who love art and especially paintings might recognise it from Canaletto’s painting SS Giovanni e Paolo and the Scuola di San Marco, dated 1725 and now on exhibit in Dresden’s Gallery of Old Masters. If I look at photos of this painting today it is fascinating how realistic it is. It could have been a photo of today, but of course, the clothes are different. But with the painting’s perspective the beautiful façade cannot be properly seen. It reminded me of Chiesa Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Miracoli and indeed it is the same architect, Pietro Lombardi, who started the work. It was finished however by Mauro Coducci in 1500. In addition to these polychrome porphyry roundels the most intriguing aspect is the symmetrical or even symmetrical-asymmetrical facade of the entrance portal and especially the parts left and right. If you stand far away it looks very three-dimensional, but the closer you walk towards it, the more the illusion becomes obvious: these details in the arch are reliefs but done in a kind of trompe d’œil style (although I don’t know if this is a proper name also for stone work). I had to touch the walls to feel that it is not three-dimensional. So much for a perfect illusion even from up close.
    The portal is beautifully decorated and shows scenes of the life of San Marco.

    Today this magnificent building is part of the civil hospital (Ospedale Civile). A medicine library is located in the upper floor and I read that there is still the scuole’s Sala del Albergo with a golden coffer vault. The interior seems to be open to the public, according to the Scuola di San Marco website. But I had to leave this for my next time.

    Best time for photos is in the afternoon when the sun shines on the southern facade.

    Vaporetto stop: Ospedale Civile, lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Address: Venezia, Campo San Zanipolo

    This is not three-dimensional :-) One of the relief style lions The arch in total view Beautifully elaborated portal pillar And a view of the southern fa��ade
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    Vittorio Emanuele 11 monument

    by suvanki Updated Oct 7, 2010

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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - SAN ZACCARIA

    On the Riva degli Schiavoni is this impressive statue to Vittorio Emanuele 11, who was the first king of the united Italy.

    The monument was created by the Roman sculpter, Ettore Ferrari. It was inaugurated on 1st May 1887, and illustrates the ripping off of the chains of Austrian dominance. It depicts Vittorio on horseback on a stone plinth. Below are lions and dragons.

    Between the statue and the next bridge is Pensione Wilder (No 4161), where Henry James completed 'Portrait of A Lady' in 1887

    Address: Riva degli Schiavani Castello Venice

    Directions: Vaporetto Station- SAN ZACCARIA

    Vittorio Emanuele 11 statue Castello Venice Vittorio Emanuele 11 statue base Vittorio Emanuele 11 statue rear
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    some real Venice

    by Mahieu Written Aug 1, 2004

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    I can't repeat it enough, but Venice is so much more than St Mark's Square! Of course, you need to see that if you're in Venice, just don't limit yourself to that area.
    My favourite area was Castello. In and around the Via Garibaldi, it is so quiet and you see harldy any tourists. Laundry drying outside, elder people taking a rest on one of the benches, ... : this is my kind of Venice!

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    Chiesa S. Francesco della Vigna & vineyards

    by Trekki Updated Jun 23, 2015

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    I continued my walks through Venice’s north eastern following the streets east of Basilica Santi Giovanni e Paolo, through very charming tiny little streets where I must have been the only visitor on that day. I saw a campanile which drew my attention but I knew it could not be *the* Campanile. This is how I eventually arrived in front of the church San Francesco della Vigna. From the outside it looked more like a Greek temple and later I read that it was Palladio’s first work in Venice.

    Legends say that San Marco (St. Mark the Evangelist, Venezia’s patron saint) once arrived here during a stormy night. An angel appeared and greeted him with the words Pax tibi Marce Evangelista meus (peace with you, oh Mark, my Evangelist). These words we know from the many San Marco lion sculptures: they are chiselled into the book he holds in his paws.

    The church is named after a vineyard (vigna = vineyard) and, if we look at the satellite images, it might still be there, north of the church.

    When I was there the church was closed but I have read that it is filled with rich artwork: paintings by Veronese, a madonna by Giovanni Bellini and relief work by Pietro Lombardo. Sadly I forgot to note down the opening hours to come back. All I can say is that the church is not included in the former Chorus Pass (now Venezia Unica Pass, churches). The website Churches of Venice describes San Francesco della Vigna quite good and says the opening hours would be 8 a.m. to 12:30 and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

    Also try to visit the cloister to the north of the church. From the photos in the website it must be a very peaceful place.

    But the most ... well I can say ecstasising thing happened when I turned around the corner at the church’s entrance and saw .... the questura where Donna Leon’s Commissario Brunetti works in the TV series. This building complex is so characteristic, I saw it so often when I watched the series and I stood first speechless and then laughing for many many minutes. Luckily no one came by, I might had been locked elsewhere. But this, Brunetti, is also a story for elsewhere, for my off path section to be precise.

    Vaporetto stop: Celestia (one stop east of Ospedale), lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of Chiesa San Francesco della Vigna on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Address: Venezia, Castello

    Directions: From Campo SS Giovanni e Paolo, walk straight eastward, turn left at the (only) bridge and then right again.

    Website: http://www.churchesofvenice.co.uk/castello.htm

    San Francesco della Vigna, facade detail San Francesco della Vigna, facade detail San Francesco della Vigna, the campo The colonnades next to the church Colonnades and
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    Join me on a tour through “my” Castello

    by Trekki Updated Jun 22, 2015

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    Writing about Venice will always be a difficult task because almost everything has been said. I have decided that I will arrange my reviews according to the walks I did during my 12 days in town in May 2007. Hence the result is a kind of walking sequence through the individual districts or sestiere.
    This is my walking sequence through Castello, the eastern district of Venice. Castello walks part 1, 2 and 3 (see screenshots of Bing Maps with the respective localtions).

    Castello is one of my two favourite sestiere. Many locals live here, it has a very vivid and bustling atmosphere. The shops, bars and restaurants are frequented mostly by locals, and this is why many almost authentic restaurants with reasonable prices and often also homemade food can be found here.

    My Calstello walks started nearby where I stayed in an apartment, at Campo San Zanipolo, next to the splendid exterior of Scuola di San Marco. The famous Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo is there with a beautiful interior and tombs of many of the city’s doges. From there I walked further east to San Francesco della Vigna and also found Brunetti’s questura from the book around the corner.

    I continued walking south, past the western walls of Arsenale to Arsenale, one of the reasons why Venice was so powerful in the past. The Arsenale’s entrance portal is splendid but the guards don’t allow visitors inside, so the only way to see at least something of the interior is to peek inside from the bridge. From there I just followed the flow and visited Museo Storico Navale which was one of my favourite museums in Venice. And through the backstreets of Castello, past an interesting the fish scale of the past trading days I arrived at the bridge to Isola San Pietro. I spent a relaxed afternoon on Isola San Pietro, visited the Chiesa di San Pietro and afterwards walked back through Via Garibaldi, found a lovely statue of Garibaldi statue with sea turtles, spent another relaxed time in Garibaldi Park before I walked back via the rive to Piazza San Marco.

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo, (4) Chiesa San Francesco della Vigna on Bing Maps.
    Location of (1) Arsenale’s western walls, (2) Arsenale, (3) Arsenale’s entrance portal. (4) the bridge in front of the large area of Arsenale, (5) Museo Storico Navale, (6) Backstreet Castello and the fish scale on Bing Maps.
    Location of (1) bridge to Isola San Pietro, (2) Chiesa San Pietro, (3) Isola San Pietro, (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text without my permission.). Update June 2015: completely revised wording.

    My Castello walks, part 1 My Castello walks, part 2 My Castello walks, part 3
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    Backstreet Castello, is your fish big enough

    by Trekki Updated Nov 24, 2015

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    When I saw Christine(j)’s review about ancient measurements in Heidelberg, precisely is your pretzel big enough I smiled and realised how many of these old measurements had been used in the old ages. And so in Venice too.

    I had read that there is a “fish scale” measurement near Arsenale and Museo Storico Navale. And of course I had to find it! It is located in the little street behind the museum, called Fondamenta Rio della Tana. Tana means hole or even rat hole and might have specified the secret and closed of Arsenale complex as it was seen by the locals who didn’t work there. This street is interesting because even more it shows how shut off the whole complex was, very impressive. And while I was taking in this serene atmosphere on a lazy Sunday afternoon I found the sign at a house wall almost at the end of this little street, the fish measurements. They were meant as a scale to assure that no one who bought fish could be betrayed: it shows the minimal length for the various fish from the lagoon and the sea. It was here at Rio della Tana where the fishermen sold their catch of the day in Venice’s old days.

    Other old measurement standards are in Dornoch (Scotland), cloth size (by Joan, @scotishvisitor), Speyer (Germany), general measuring device and in Norcia, measuring grain.

    Vaporetto stop: Arsenale (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (2) Arsenale, (5) Museo Storico Navale, (6) Backstreet Castello and the fish scale on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Address: Venezia, Fondamenta della Tana

    Is your fish big enough? Campo della Tana and Cordiere (left) Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana
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    THE HIDDEN STATUE

    by DAO Updated Dec 4, 2009

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    La Donna Partigiana. That’s her official name. She is one of the most intriguing statues in the world, and one of the best hidden. In high tide this forlorn statue is submerged under the dark green waters of the lagoon. In low tide and sunlight she looks like a large piece of metal seaweed lying on stone steps. Look closer. You will see the shape of a body of a woman. This is a monument to the women killed fighting in WWII. Very few statues were ever erected to women who died during the world wide conflict of WWII. And no statue tells this story of secrecy and sadness better than this.

    Address: On the Riva Dei Sette Martiri

    Directions: Castello area, at the water’s edge.

    Website: http://xoomer.virgilio.it/parmanelweb/PARTIGIANE.htm

    CLICK HERE AND LOOK SIDEWAYS
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    Riva degli Schiavoni - Funfair

    by suvanki Updated Oct 7, 2010

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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - SAN ZACARRIA or ARSENALE

    Popular with local children and teenagers. I understand that this fair is only open December and January.

    About half a dozen rides, including dodgem cars, side stalls such as a rifle range/hook a duck/ hoola hoops - with the chance to win bottles of whiskey. money etc- but more likely to be a tacky keyring!

    I always find it slightly amusing watching adults desperately trying to win something of less value than the amount of money that they've forked out, in the idea that 'THIS TIME' I'll get it!

    An assortment of foodstalls selling the usual fairground fodder - candy floss, hot dogs, burgers, hot and cold drinks, including small bottles of wine.

    UPDATE- DECEMBER 08 - The fair had expanded in size since my last visit, though Christmas Eve/ Day some stalls/ rides were closed at night.

    Address: Riva Ca D Dio / Riva Degli Schiavoni Castello

    Directions: This funfair is situated next to the Arsenale Bridge, and stretches nearly to the Pieta

    Vaporetto SAN ZACCARIA or ARSENALE

    Fairground  - Riva degli Sciavoni Venice Fairground Riva degli Sciavoni Venice Fairground and bridge  Riva degli Schiavoni Venice
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    walk in Castello

    by mindcrime Updated Jul 3, 2009

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    We started to walk behind La Pieta church to explore Castello. First we saw the church S.Giovanni Batista in Bragova (pic 1) at campo Bandiera e Moro. It was the place where Vivaldi was baptized and he was lived at one of the houses of this campo. The campo has an interesting background because it is named after 2 brothers and one friend that were executed for betrayal to British government. They are buried in the church. The church looks very old and probably is as many guidebooks say that its from 8th century but it was rebuilt in 1475. The interior is very simple but you can see some nice paintings like A.Vivarini’s Resurrected Christ(1498) and Baptism of Christ in Jordan by Cima da Conegliano (1492), a magnificent bright painting. The church is dedicated to St John the Baptist of course but the word Bragora reminded me of the greek word Agora which is the market place.

    Then we got lost in almost isolated alleys(pic 2) with names like calle de la Madonna, we came across many dead ends and many old people too! After a big circle we returned to the south part of Castello to see San Giorgio dei Greci (pic 3), a greek church that dates back from 1536 but the most impressive thing to see here in the bell tower that looks like Piza’s tower (it seems the lake will destroy it sooner or later). If you go inside you will notice that the seating places are different for male and females, something very common in Greece and you can also see some typical Byzantine paintings. The orthodox service takes place on Sunday morning. Next to the church is the Scuola di San Nicolo dei Greci that houses the Museo di Icone of the Greek Institute. It is open 9.00-17.00 but it was closed when we passed by. The greek community(mainly merchants and artists) came after 15th century and based around this area.

    We took a look at Palazzo Priuli(pic4), a beautiful gothic palace that houses a luxury hotel. It used to have some great fresoces on the façade but they are gone although you can still admire the nice windows.

    Last but not least we visited San Zaccaria church (pic 5). It is based on Campo San Zaccaria and the sun tried to kill us but hopefully the near by café saved us. The architecture of this church is a mix of neogothic and renaissance style. It was first built on 9th century and rebuilt in 1515. There was a Benedictine nuunery next to the church that were supposed to show provocative behaviour because most of the nunneries came from high class families! There are many beautiful paintings inside but don’t miss Madonna and Child With Saints (1505) by Giovanni Bellini(1430-1516). Yes, he was old when he made this but what a masterpiece.

    S.Giovanni Batista in Bragova alley in Castello San Giorgio dei Greci Palazzo Priuli San Zaccaria church
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    Via Giuseppe Garibaldi or Via Garibaldi

    by suvanki Updated Jan 22, 2009

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    CASTELLO (East)
    Via Garibaldi was one of my favourite places to wander along - bustling with life, there's plenty to see on this wide street, which has quite a local feel to it. Children playing, old friends chatting, stall holders serving the local customers etc

    This was originally the site of a wide canal, which connected the Bacino dei San Marco to the inlet of the Canale de San Pietro. It was filled in in 1808 during Napoleons rule of the city.

    Via Garibaldi leads to the island of San Pietro- the first inhabited area of Venice.

    From the waterfront Riva dei Sette Martini, the first point of interest is the first house on the right- a plaque indicates this was the home of John (Giovanni) and Sebastiano Cabot - explorers /navigators who discovered Newfoundland.

    Continuing along, on the right is a large metal gateway, which takes you past an impressive statue of Garibaldi, along Viale Garibaldi to the Public Gardens - I'll be covering this in another tip

    Just before You forget that You're in Venice, Via Garibaldi ends and continues forward as Fondamente Sant' Anna, as a canal (Rio di Sant' Anna) which appears from behind a stone wall.

    This was an interesting area to linger.
    One barge operated as a floating fruit and veg shop, which was doing a good trade!
    Other boats floated along carrying building tools, or boxes of goods. This was very much a working area, a complete contrast to the tourist throngs less than a mile away.

    Please click onto my other pics below on this tip for these views

    Address: Via Giuseppe Garibaldi, Castello, Venice

    Directions: Vaporetto Station - Arsenale or Giardini

    Via Garibaldi and Cabots house Castello Venice Via Garibaldi Rio di Sant' Anna and Via Garibaldi Washing drying Near Via Garibaldi Floating market, Rio di Sant' Anna, Venice
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    Via Garibaldi

    by Jefie Updated Sep 6, 2010

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    If you walk all the way to the end of Riva degli Schiavoni, you'll eventually end up near Via Garibaldi, which has to be one of the largest streets in all of Venice. It was actually created by Napoleon in 1808 when he gave orders to fill up a large canal that would lead to the public gardens he also planned on establishing. It's actually a little weird to come upon a street that's large enough to accommodate cars after having spent several days walking around Venice's tiny little streets! The very first house on Via Garibaldi once belonged to Giovanni Caboto, or John Cabot as he is better known in Canada. This Venitian explorer landed in Newfoundland in 1497 and became the first European since the Vikings to set foot in what was to become Canada. The entrance to the public gardens can be found a little way further down the street, maked by a beautiful bronze statue of Giuseppe Garibaldi. These gardens are home to several pavilions used during the "Biennale di Venezia", one of the world's most famous art festivals.

    Address: Via Garibaldi

    Directions: In the Castello area

    Via Garibaldi in Venice, Italy Giovanni Caboto's house on Via Garibaldi Garibaldi statue near the public gardens' entrance
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    Walking along Riva degli Schiavoni

    by Jefie Updated Sep 11, 2010

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    If you walk past the Palazzo Ducale heading for the Castello area, you'll find yourself on the Riva degli Schiavoni which, together with Piazza San Marco, has for a very long time been one of Venice's most popular high-scale tourist areas. Even if you don't plan on staying at one of the Riva's upscale hotels or have dinner at one of the rather expensive restaurants, it's still fun to go on a lazy stroll in the evening and take in all the sights and atmosphere.

    From the Ponte della Paglia, you can first admire the "Bridge of Sighs", which was built at the beginning of the 17th century to connect the Palazzo Ducale with the new prisons. Although it sounds and looks quite romantic, the "Ponte dei Sospiri" actually got its name from the prisoners' laments as they made their was across the bridge and into the prison. Another point of interest on the Riva degli Schiavoni is Hotel Danieli, an upscale hotel established in a 14th century palazzo that has attracted many famous guests throughout the years, including authors such as Marcel Proust and Charles Dickens as well as composers such as Claude Debussy and Richard Wagner - it's definitely worth going inside to take a look at the gorgeous lobby area! Another hotel with a literary connection on the Riva degli Schiavoni that was of interest to me is the Pensione Wildner, where Henry James resided in 1881 as he was putting the final touch to his famous novel "The Portrait of a Lady".

    Address: Riva degli Schiavoni

    Directions: In the Castello area

    Riva degli Schiavoni in Venice, Italy In the lobby of Hotel Danieli Hotel Danieli on the Riva degli Schiavoni Pensione Wildner on Riva degli Schiavoni
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