Ponte dei Sospiri, Venice

4 out of 5 stars 137 Reviews

Ponte dei Sospiri - SAN MARCO 0412715911
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Ponte dei Sospiri

    by MM212 Updated Sep 4, 2009

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    One of Venice's most famous bridges, il Ponte dei Sospiri, known in English as the Bridge of Sighs, connects the Palazzo Ducale with the Prigione Nuove, i.e. the new prisons of the Doge's Palace. Its name derived from supposed sighs of the criminals who traversed the bridge on their way to the ruthless prisons across the canal. The bridge was built in the 17th century using Istrian stone, carved in a Baroque style. While both its architecture and its purpose are unique in Venice, I still found the Bridge of Sighs to be a bit of a disappointment, but try not to be swayed by my opinion.

    Address: Ponte dei Sospiri - SAN MARCO

    Ponte dei Sospiri (Bridge of Sighs) - Nov 05
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  • abi_maha's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by abi_maha Updated Feb 2, 2009

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    It was a wierd experience to visit this dungeon and get a feel of how convicts feel when couped up in their prisons. By the time we got out me and dad were actually feeling quite claustrophobic!
    The Bridge of Sighs (Italian: Ponte dei Sospiri) is one of many bridges in Venice. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino (whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge), and built between 1600 and 1603.

    The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells. In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals[1].

    View from under the bridge
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    THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS

    by wanderingbilly Updated Nov 13, 2008

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    WHEN IN VENICE YOU WILL NO DOUBT CROSS MANY MANY BRIDGES..BUT ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS IS THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS. THIS BRIDGE LINKS THE DOGES PALACE AND THE PRISON.
    IT GOT ITS NAME BECAUSE IT IS SAID THAT AS THE PRISONERS WERE BEING LED ACROSS THE BRIDGE ON THEIR WAY TO THE PRISON CELLS THEY WOULD LOOK OUT TO CATCH THEIR LAST GLIMPSE OF VENICE..AND AS THEY CAUGHT THEIR FINAL GLIMPSE THEY WOULD GIVE A HEAVY SIGH...THUS GIVING THE BRIDGE ITS NAME..THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS.
    THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS IS BEST SEEN AS PART OF THE DOGE'S PALACE TOUR..A REVIEW OF WHICH I WILL DO NEXT.

    Address: DOGE'S PALACE..PIAZZA SAN MARCO.

    Directions: PIAZZA SAN MARCO.

    FROM PALACE TO PRISON..THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS
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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs – Ponte dei Sospiri

    by grayfo Written Oct 15, 2008

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    The Bridge of Sighs was constructed between 1600 and 1603 and is made from white Istrian Stones. It was built to connect the Doge's prisons, or Prigioni, with the inquisitor's rooms in the main palace. The bridge crosses the Rio di Palazzo.

    The designer Antoni Contino was the nephew of Antonio da Ponte, the man who designed the Rialto Bridge.

    Directions: Located just off the side of Saint Mark's Plaza

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by lina112 Updated Sep 4, 2008

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    The bridge, that houses two overlapping corridors, was built at the beginning of the 17th century form a design by Antonio Contin and used to serve as a link between the Old Prisons, in the Doge's Palace, and the New Prisons, situated beyond the Palazzo River.

    El puente fue construido a principios del siglo XVII, diseño de Antonio Contin. Era el camino que seguian los condenados a muerte y desde sus ventanas era por donde miraban por última vez la laguna veneciana

    Address: San Marco 1, 30124 Venice

    Directions: Entrance for the public: Porta del Frumento, Piazzetta San Marco

    Website: http://www.museiciviciveneziani.it/frame.asp?musid=8&sezione=musei

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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by londonlover Written Jun 7, 2008

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    The Doge's Palace is definitely a must-see on a trip to Venezia, and this is the one of the best parts...crossing the Bridge of Sighs. Imagine crossing it as your last view of the outside world on your way to the prison, as many did....

    Directions: Enter through the Doge's Palace museum.

    Website: http://www.tickitaly.com/galleries/doges-palace-venice.php

    Looking south out from the bridge Looking north out from the bridge

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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs: Ponte dei Sospiri

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 4, 2008

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    "The Bridge of Sighs is one of many bridges in Venice. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino (whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge), and built between 1600 and 1603.

    The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells. In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals[1].

    A local legend says that lovers will be assured eternal love if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the bridge. This legend played a key part in the 1979 film A Little Romance."

    Taken from Wikipedia

    Not only was the bridge the last glimpse for prisoners. It was were family members stood when prisoners were walking back to Doge's Palace and the Square for their public execution. Family would wait on the bridge where tourists stand and wave to the convict for their final farewell.

    This is a very famous bridge and at different parts of the day will get very crowded. It's best to take your snap shot and get out of the way for others to do the same. However, it's not crowded at all parts of the day when you can gaze at it and go back in time to watch old prisoners say their final fairwells to Venice.

    Directions: It is connected to Doge's Palace on the side of St. Mark's Square facing the water

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bridge_of_Sighs

    The Bridge Inside the Bridge (guided tour) The cells where prisoners were kept Inside Doge's Palace

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Bridge over waters

    by BruceDunning Updated May 28, 2008

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    We took some bridges and hugged the walls along the canals to keep track from where we came to know where we were going. We did get lost, though. The directions we saw dusk, and then returning at dark was fun, but kind of scary not knowing how lost you may be, as to when you may recognize a landmark and know how to get out of the maze.
    I suppose if you get to a bigger channel of water, you then know you are at a large canal before it enters the sea. The sites in deeper into the enclave are wonderful. Locals are doing their usual thing and it is enjoyable to see them go about their daily tasks and shopping.

    Bridge of Sighs bridges every 2-3 blocks Aerial view of Rialto Typical small bridge to a home Rialto-climbing the pinnacle
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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Puente de los suspiros / Bridge of Sighs

    by elpariente Written May 20, 2008

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    Parece ser que fue Lord Byron en el siglo XIX , el que le dió este nombre al puente y no por un motivo romántico , sino que es aquí donde los prisioneros , suspiraban , al ver por última vez el agua del río de Palazzo y la luz del cielo , antes de abandonar los tribunales del Palacio Ducal y pasar a las prisiones de Piombi , donde les metían en unos pozos (pozzi) lúgubres e insalubres que estaban debajo del techo sobre una lámina de plomo ( Piombo)


    It seems that Lord Byron was in the nineteenth century, who gave the name to the bridge , more than for a romantic occasion, because here is where the prisoners, sigh, seeing for the last time the Palazzo river and the day light , before leaving the courts of the Ducal Palace and as they were moving to the Piombi prison, where they were put in some wells (Pozzi) , ghastly and unhealthy that were below the ceiling under a sheet of lead (Piombo)

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    Ponte dei Sospiri

    by ealgisi Written Apr 30, 2008

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    The bridge passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons with the interrogation rooms.

    Convicts had the last view of Venice before their imprisonment from this bridge.

    His name has been given by Lord Byron and comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of the city.

    There's a local legend saying that lovers will be assured eternal love if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the bridge.

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  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    Another some keywords

    by eksvist Updated Apr 27, 2008

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    The Ponte dei Sospiri - the Bridge of Sighs is one of many bridges in Venice.
    The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino (whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge), and built between 1600 and 1603.
    The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment.
    The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells.
    A local legend says that lovers will be assured eternal love if they kiss on a gondola at sunset under the bridge. This legend played a key part in the 1979 film A Little Romance.

    Palazzo Ducale di Venezia - The Doge's Palace - is a gothic palace, what was the residence of the Doge of Venice.
    Its two most visible facades look towards the Venetian Lagoon and St Mark's Square, or rather the Piazzetta. The use of arcading in the lower stories produces an interesting "gravity-defying" effect. There is also effective use of colour contrasts (unfortunately, the patterns are not well shown in the illustrative photographs accompanying this article...from a distance the colours blur). The building is preserved as a museum.

    Campanile di San Marco - St Mark's Campanile is the bell tower of St Mark's Basilica, located in the square of the same name. It is a recognizable symbol of the city. The tower is 98.6 meters tall, and stands alone in a corner of St Mark's Square, near the front of the basilica.
    In the bell tower there is a wonderful view all over the Venice. In 2005 the ticket price was 6 eur.

    The Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute - Basilica of St Mary of Health/Salvation, commonly known simply as the Salute, is a famous church in Venice, placed scenically at a narrow finger of land which lies between the Grand Canal and the Bacino di San Marco on the lagoon, visible as one enters the Piazza San Marco from the water. While it has the status of a minor basilica, its decorative and distinctive profile and location make it among the most photographed churches in Italy.

    Ponte di Rialto - The Rialto Bridge is one of the three bridges spanning the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. It is the oldest bridge across the canal and probably the most famous in the city.

    The Bridge of Sighs The Doge's Palace St Mark's Campanile The Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute The Rialto Bridge

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    Bridge of Sighs

    by wilocrek Written Mar 31, 2008

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    The real name of this bridge is "Ponte dei Sospiri", but as American tourists continue to over run Venice the name of this bridge had been bastardized to what we all know as the Bridge of Sighs. it crosses the Rio di Palazzo and connects the Doge's Palace with the prison. It is a very narrow crossing that will leave you at the other side, breathing a "sigh" of relief...........

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  • darkjedi's Profile Photo

    Bridge Of Sighs

    by darkjedi Written Mar 24, 2008

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    The Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri) is one of many bridges in Venice. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the old prisons to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace.

    The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice out the window before being taken down to their cells. In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals.

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Bridge of Sighs

    by sim1 Updated Feb 17, 2008

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    The bridge that speaks to the imagination..... The name 'Bridge of Sighs' was invented in the 19th Century, when Lord Byron helped to popularize the belief that the bridge's name was inspired by the sighs of condemned prisoners as they were led through it to the executioner. (In reality, the days of inquisitions and summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built, and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals.)

    Photo: The bridge Ponte dei Sospiri (Bridge of Sighs) from Ponte della Paglia.

    The bridge Ponte dei Sospiri / Bridge of Sighs
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    Ponte dei Sospiri | The Bridge of Sighs (V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Feb 8, 2008

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    The Bridge of Sighs is one of the best known artifacts in Venice. There is no a single tourist who visited Venice and failed to see the Bridge of Sighs. This bridge, connecting Palazzo Ducale – Doge's Palace and Prigioni Nuove – the New Prisons, was built in the first decade of the 17th century and it is work of Antonio Contin. The idea that prisoners sighed at their last glimpse of Venice as they passed before the windows of the Bridge of Sighs is a Romantic fancy of the 19th century.

    Address: San Marco

    Directions: The best view of the Bridge of Sighs is from Ponte della Paglia, and walk over it is part of tourist visit to Doges' Palace.

    The Bridge of Sighs and Ponte della Paglia behind
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