By Metro, Moscow

117 Reviews

  • By Metro
    by AnnaHermans
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    Luzhniki Stadium
    by Muscovite
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    Interior and 'Red Arrow' train
    by Muscovite

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  • Muscovite's Profile Photo

    Metro stations’ splendor

    by Muscovite Written Oct 30, 2015

    I have accidentally run into this collection of professional photos with the most spectacular Moscow metro stations on display – from the oldest, like Kropotkinskaya and Sokol to the fairly new Aeroport.
    There is one ‘but’:
    Two of the stations mentioned in the article – ‘Sportivnaya’ and ‘Avoto (really Avtovo)’ -actually belong to St. Petersburg metro. Hope one doesn’t try to make a direct connection!

    Novokuznetskaya station
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  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    The Metro

    by stevemt Updated Aug 19, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    All I can say is wonderful and so cheap.

    See my things to do pages for some photos

    The Moscow metro is world famous for the decoration of the stationas.

    They have conducted tours of the metro stations for visitors.

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  • jorgejuansanchez's Profile Photo

    From airport Domodedovo to downtown Moscow

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Jun 6, 2015

    In 2015 I went to Moscow. I landed in Domodedovo airport. In order to get to the center I took a bus in front of the airport to the closest Metro station, called also Domodedovo or Domodedovskaya, and then headed to the circular line, and there I made a combination to the Kremlin or Red Square. Very easy and I enjoyed the beautiful Metro. I paid 100 r. per the bus ride, and 50 more per easch Metro ride. I lked the stations Paveletskaya and Taganskaya.

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  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Moscow metro system

    by Odiseya Updated Dec 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moscow metro system is very effective public transportation system. It is not just way you easy navigate trough huge city then and experience itself. It was high on my things-to-do list quite some time.

    I find out that not all metro stations here looks like art gallery. It is recommended to follow description on your map of metro.

    I find out that this is busiest metro in the world and that is well known fact. It said that more then 8 millions people daily. It is fast, clean and efficient way of traveling trough city especially if you have in mind queues at roads.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Metro - Practicalities

    by johngayton Updated Nov 19, 2014

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    I'm a big fan of a good public transport system and Moscow's Metro was pretty much my #1 thing to do on my last visit. But no matter what I read about it, or the pics that I came across on various websites, nothing quite prepared me for just how impressive it is - both as a utilitarian mass-transit (9 million journeys every day) system and as a tourist sight in its own right.

    With its trains running the whole system roughly every minute from 5.30 am until midnight, 7 days a week, this is an amazingly efficient mode of transport for getting around. Not only is it efficient, it's cheap, and once you get the idea of how to use it, it's simplicity itself for getting from A to B.

    Not that you want to rush your journeys. The cathedral-like stations, with their impressive architecture and artistic finishes, need to be savoured in exactly the same way as you'd do your sightseeing around the above-ground attractions.

    Buying a ticket is easy. For most tourist purposes you can buy an electronic ticket loaded with the number of rides you require - 1, 2, 5, 11, 20, 40 or 60 - you'll find current prices on the website. A ride is not time-limited and so no matter how many metro changes you make, or whether you back-track, your ticket is valid for as long as you stay in the system. The tickets can be bought from the desks (just indicate the number of rides you require) or from the easy to use machines.

    To access the system just touch your ticket against the gate and it'll let you through. If you have a multi-ride ticket the display on the gate will tell you how many journeys you still have loaded.

    Perhaps the most off-putting thing is the Russian Cyrillic alphabet but if you ignore that and do a bit of forward planning you don't even need to be able to read the station signs. All the up-to-date tourist maps, even the freebie one I got from my hotel, will have the station names in English as well as Cyrillic. The 12 lines are colour-coded and the stations have direction signage which follows this colour-coding - the recently modernised ones even have the lines and directions in English. The one thing you do have to be aware of though is that at most intersections between lines the stations, although connected, have different names.

    So, to get from A to B you need to plan your journey. The website below has a very useful interactive map where you can click on your start and end stations and it'll give you timings and interchanges

    One thing you will find is that once on a train you often won't be able to see the destination station name as you arrive. The thing to do is to note the number of stations you need to pass and count down as you go. If you get confused when you start off and are unsure whether you've got on the train heading in the direction you want then listen for the announcements - you can always determine the direction of the train by the gender of the announcer.

    "When you are taking a train to the center of Moscow you hear a male announcer. But as soon as you cross the city center you'll hear a female voice announcing stations. There's a good mnemonic rule: 'your boss calls you to work; your wife calls you home'.

    On the ring line the clock-wise direction submits to the male voice, while counterclockwise direction is under the guidance of fair sex.

    This system was initially invented to help the blind. Listening to announcements you can find your way even if you don't understand the language." *

    * Above quote from bridgetomoscow.com (with permission).

    You'll find the metro safe, clean, and even when busy (it can get VERY during the rush hours) it's totally hassle-free. Trains are reliable and if one is a bit too packed just wait for the next one. Don't stress and do take your time to admire the architecture and decor - amateur photography is now allowed but obviously refrain from sticking your camera in people's faces and switch your flash off.

    Website: http://engl.mosmetro.ru/

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Metro - A Brief History.

    by johngayton Written Nov 17, 2014

    In addition to being one of the world's busiest public transport systems - the official website claims 9 million trips daily - Moscow's Metro is a tourist attraction in its own right.

    Construction on the metro began in the 1930's at the instigation of Josef Stalin and was part of the planned industrialisation of the USSR. Vast quantities of building materials were required, in particular steel, and so mines, foundries and factories were built throughout the republics. Although much of the labour needed was unskilled manual the education system notched up a gear to provide the professional skills of the craftsmen (and women), the engineers and the managers.

    Not only was the metro to be designed as a utilitarian transit system but Stalin's overview required that it reflected the triumphs of Socialism and that the stations should embody "svet" (radiance or brilliance) and "svetloe budushchee" (a radiant future).

    The first line opened on May 15th, 1935 to a well-organised public fanfare which included parades and concerts - there was even a triumphal anthem commissioned, "Songs of the Joyous Metro Conquerors", of which 25,000 copies were distributed. The line, which appropriately now forms the backbone of the present-day Red Line 1, was 11 kilometres in length with 13 stations beginning at Sokolniki, passing through the city centre at Okhotny Ryad and continuing through to Park Kultury and Smolenskaya.

    The stations were built on a grandiose-scale, anticipating perhaps just how busy they would become, with high vaulted ceilings and fabulously ornate decorations. Each had a different theme, and although often described under the lump-heading of "Socialist Realism", their artistic styles and the materials employed, are amazingly diverse.

    Until Stalin's death in 1953, as the 2nd, 3rd and 4th stages of the metro's expansion were completed, the stations continued to be constructed with their elegant, individual, theming. His successor Khrushchev however preferred a more utilitarian, and also less-expensive, design and so the stations built between the late 1950's and mid 1970's were pretty much identical.

    Despite the USSR's economic problems in the 1970's the then First Secretary Brezhnev continued with the metro's expansion and perhaps as a reaction to the circumstances re-instituted the architectural flamboyance of the stations.

    Not even the collapse of the USSR and Socialism in Russia have slowed the metro's development. At the time of writing, November 2014, the system comprises 12 lines with a total length of 325 kilometres and 195 stations. Expansion is still ongoing with a further 150 kilometres, including an outer circle line, expected to be completed by 2020.

    Just as a taster here's a (almost random) selection of pics:

    Website: http://engl.mosmetro.ru/

    Komsomolskaya Park Pobedi Kievskaya Sretenskii Bulvar Ploschad Revolutskii
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  • Muscovite's Profile Photo

    Metro Wi-Fi

    by Muscovite Updated Aug 13, 2014

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    I was quite surprised to see people internet-surfing in our metro.
    I though they are super-rich and went mobile, but no, it turned out that the Moscow metro had installed Wi-Fi!

    My red line (that’s not what you think, it’s the colour on the map) is # 1 here, too (see the map).
    The other pioneering line is the brown circular (# 5).
    And by the end of 2014 Wi-Fi network will cover the entire system, the official metro site says.

    Look for the Wi-Fi sign - usually above the door of the carriage.

    Phone: +7 (495) 688-02-93

    Website: http://engl.mosmetro.ru/pages/page_1.php?id_page=56&cdate=11-2013&id_text=1077

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  • Muscovite's Profile Photo

    Metro at half-price

    by Muscovite Updated May 28, 2014

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    Basically you pay 40 roubles for one metro ride. But that’s only if you pay as you go.

    Supposing you are planning to spend 5 days or so in Moscow. It’s a good idea to rent a flat and share it with fellow budget tourists.
    Supposing there are four of you; buying one ‘Unified’ will give you 60 metro rides for 1200 roubles, that’s 15 rides per person.

    Can you use 15 metro rides in five days – that’s 3 rides a day?
    Easily:
    1) From your hotel to the Kremlin (or Red Square)
    2) From the Kremlin to Novodevichy Convent (or Arbat street)
    3) Back to your hotel
    That’s 20 roubles/ride instead of 40!

    Planning and cooperation = good economy.

    Website: http://troika.mos.ru/en/tariffs/table/

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    Vorobyovy Gory museum metro station - 2

    by Muscovite Updated Jan 30, 2014

    After the porcelain exhibition the Vorobyovy Gory metro station had got another tenant – the Darwin museum. Its visitors are mostly school kids, and all these figurines substitute for real-life animals – it’s not a zoo, after all.
    Shame indeed they are protected by thick glass walls, they send reflex into the camera.

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    Vorobyovy Gory metro station

    by Muscovite Written Jan 30, 2014

    Vorobyovy Gory metro station is unique.
    First comes its structure - the station takes the lower level of the bridge accross the Moscow river, the upper level is an motor road; you can see occasional daring pedestrians there, too.
    Second - it's never crowded; pretty far to walk to the University on the one bank and the Luzhniki stadium on the other.
    Third - no artificial light needed, the station is sort of a natural exhibition hall. Strange indeed it was only lately that the metro administration had got this idea. But the result was great – starting with the porcelain expo a couple of years ago, they have new exhibitions regularly.
    The station as such look fairly modest, but the view over the Moscow river on both sides is great.

    Interior and 'Red Arrow' train Federation Tower - Moscow City Luzhniki Stadium Academy of Sciences
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    Vorobyovy Gory museum metro station - 1

    by Muscovite Updated Jan 30, 2014

    The wonderful porcelain exhibition at Vorobyovy Gory metro station - worth of any real museum
    NB: It's free! - Except for the metro fare :)

    There are four hits:
    - the two celebrated Moscow factories – the Kuznetsovs’ Dulevo and Gardner’s Verbilki,
    - plus St.Pete’s Imperial (former LFZ) factory with their famous ‘cobalt grid’
    - and the collectors' dear, the blue-and-white Gzhel.

    If you contact the metro office, they may send you a PDF booklet, but it's in Russian only.
    Photos: http://ria.ru/photolents/20101102/291801516_291794906.html

    Website: http://www.rian.ru/video/20101102/291847443.html

    Dulevo Gzhel Gardner Must be LFZ
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  • AnnaHermans's Profile Photo

    tickets

    by AnnaHermans Written Aug 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    for 300 roebel you buy a 11 trip card. You can use it with more people. The metro is not so difficult, remember the colour of your line and the endstation. When you get in count the stops. The ticket is a card you should scan at the entrance.

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Underground palaces and their carriages

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The Moscow metro is apparently twice as busy as the London and New York undergrounds combined... and I concur they were ludicrously busy! Busy but never packed like sardines as in London.

    The Moscow metro runs a smooth, easy to use, efficient, cheap and regular service and it makes getting around this very large metropolis a little quicker whilst taking some of the wear a nd tear off your feet!

    There are ticket booths and machines.... the machines have an English option!
    You can buy a card for a number of journeys and each time you scan it against the barrier (ie each new journey) it deducts one automatically.

    You will need to organise yourself between using a metro map where the station names written in the English/Latin alphabet and the names within the metros which are in cyrillic. You will soon get used to it.

    NB The dark brown line, which I called the circle line, is number 5. It operates in both clockwise and anti-clockwise directions. Tip - one direction has a man announcing the stations, the other direction has a woman (I am sorry - I can't remember whose voice is for which direction.. but you can work it out and it helps to know!)
    Inside some trains there is a red light that follows the journey to show you where you are going and which station you are proaching. This can be helpful as it is not always easy to see the name of the station you are entering (the name is ONLY on the wall train side, not platform side!)
    The circle line is also the line that has the best underground palaces / stations!

    Line 1 - RED - Sokolnicheskaya
    Line 2 - DARK GREEN - Zamoskvoretskaya
    Line 3 - DARK BLUE - Arbatsko-Pokrovskaya
    Line 4 - LIGHT BLUE - Filyovskaya
    Line 5 - BROWN (circle line) - Koltsevaya
    Line 6 - ORANGE - Kaluzhsko-Rizhskaya
    Line 7 - PINK - Tagansko-Krasnopresnenskaya
    Line 8 - YELLOW - Kalininskaya
    Line 9 - GREY - Serpukhovsko-Timiryazevskaya
    Line 10 - LIGHT GREEN - Lyublinsko-Dmitrovskaya
    Line 11 - MID BLUE - Kakhovskaya
    Line L1 - LIGHTEST BLUE - Butovskaya

    Sometimes they like to play around with the letters so it reads/sounds similiar but you are never quite sure if it is the same! ...but it is easy and I worked with the attitude that if I got on the wrong train... I would see a station I hadn't anticipated on seeing!!!

    This interactive map will help you plot the quicket journey and tell you the duration of it : http://engl.mosmetro.ru/flash/scheme01.html

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Metro

    by elpariente Updated Aug 27, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    La red del Metro de Moscú cubre todas las necesidades de un turista normal .
    El mapa del Metro es sencillo , existe una línea circular y once líneas radiales que enlazan en el centro de Moscú , por lo cual sólo hay que hacer como máximo dos transbordos para ir a cualquier estación
    El precio de un billete normal que se compra en la estación era 28 Rublos y la frecuencia de los trenes puede ser de dos a tres minutos en horas punta
    De las estaciones hablaremos en otro sitio, pero de los vagones diremos que están limpios , son cómodos y hay mucha información , aunque está con caracteres cirílicos .
    Preguntando , especialmente a la gente joven que hay más probabilidades que hable algo de inglés , aunque en general la gente es muy amable e intenta ayudarte a pesar de las barreras del idioma , contando estaciones con un plano del Metro y viendo los paneles que hay en los vagones se puede viajar perfectamente
    A los que usamos el Metro de Madrid "nos extraña" que no haya pintadas , anuncios , músicos y que esté tan limpio

    The Moscow Metro network covers all the needs of a normal tourist.
    The Metro map is simple, there is a circular line and eleven radial lines that link in the center of Moscow, so you just only have to make two transfers to go to any station in Moscow
    The price of a normal ticket, that is bought at the station , was 28 Rb and the frequency of trains can be two to three minutes at peak hours
    We will talk of stations later , but the cars are clean, comfortable and there is a lot of information, but in Cyrillic characters .
    Asking, especially to young people because are more likely to speak some English, but in general people are very friendly and try to help you despite language barriers, counting stations with a subway map and seeing there in wagons panels you can travel without problems
    Those who use the Metro de Madrid "miss" that there are not paintings in the walls , ads, musicians and that the trains and stations are so clean

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  • loja's Profile Photo

    Moscow metro

    by loja Written Aug 3, 2011

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    Metro when I was in Moscow was the main type of transportation which I was used. I bought 2 times tickets for 10 rides. I payed about 250 RUB. I suppose that this ticket is cheaper and are more useful than if you're going to buy every day ticket.
    One ride by metro cost about 30 RUB. Also is available to buy tockets for 1, 10, 20 and 60 rides.
    Metro in Moscow is the best and the fastest way to get somewhere. Yes, you can spend more than houre going by metro. But this is a Moscow, huge city and it's nothing you can do with it.
    Also I need to say that stations in Moscow are wonderful, beautiful! Not all, but some are really architecturally beautiful.

    Website: http://www.mosmetro.ru

    Ticket Metro station Sretenskiy Bulvar Metro Rimskoye Inside Inside

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