Alcazaba, Málaga

4.5 out of 5 stars 45 Reviews

C/ Alcazabilla + 34 952 22 72 30
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Large ruin

    by solopes Written Sep 4, 2015

    In my first visit I went to the Alcazaba, almost forty years ago, and was not impressed; This time I decided to appreciate it from below, and found the image much more impressive. trying to read something about it, I found some pictures that don't match the poor idea of my first visit (hard restoration? closed sections in the old days?who knows?). The question is that I'm sorry for not having spent one more hour to go inside. Nex time, for sure.
    It's a fortified palace from the 11th century said to be " the best preserved in Spain. That's it - mandatory to see!

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Alcazaba - Malaga Alcazaba - Malaga

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Palacio Nazarí

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

    Rebuilt in the 14th century by the Nasrid rulers, Palacio Nazarí contains the residential quarters. It consists of several structures joined together by multiple courtyards with porticoes and fountains. Only two of these courtyards, Patio de los Naranjos and Patio de la Alberca, and their surrounding halls are open to visitors. Much of the original stucco decorations have perished over the years, but what remains has been painstakingly restored and shows elegance and skill, but much less extravagance than the Nasrid Palace in Granada. When I visited in Feb 2005, a newly wed couple were having their photos taken (see attached photos).

    Address: Alcazaba de Málaga

    Patio de los Naranjos, Apr 2015 Wedding in Patio de la Alberca, Feb 2005 Ceiling in Palacio Nazar��, Apr 2015 One of the halls with faded decorations, Apr 2015 Arches in Patio de los Naranjos, Apr 2015
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    Torre de Maldonado

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

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    One of the most beautiful features of Alcazaba are the 11th century multi-lobed arches of Torre de Maldonado. Were these perhaps the inspiration for Venetian arches, I wonder? The tower is accessed from the Patio de los Surtidores and has a balcony with beautiful views of the city. It also leads to an adjacent tower, la Torre de la Armadura, which has a 16th century Mudéjar ceiling, built in the Islamic style by the Catholics after the Reconquest.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Arches of Torre de Madonado, Apr 2015 Arches of Torre de Madonado, Feb 2005 Torre de Maldonado, Feb 2005 Arches of Torre de Maldonado, Feb 2005 Torre de Maldonado, Apr 2015
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    Patio de los Surtidores

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

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    Patio de los Surtidores is made up of two levels. The lower is a nicely landscaped garden with fountains (hence the name "Patio of the Jets of Water") and the second is a terrace that leads into la Torre Maldonado and Palacio Nazarí (Nasrid Palace, the living quarters). An important architectural feature of the patio is the set of ornate 11th century horseshoe arches that lead into la Torre Maldonado.

    Address: Alcazaba

    Patio de los Surtidores, Apr 2015 The horseshoe arches, Feb 2005 Feb 2005 Feb 2005 Horseshoe arches, Apr 2015
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Puerta de los Cuartos de Granada

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

    The fourth and last gate one encounters when visiting Alcazaba is Puerta de los Cuartos de Granada. It leads into the Nasrid Palace (Palacio Nazarí), which is the residential quarter of the rulers of the city.

    Puerta de los Cuartos de Granada, Apr 2015 Puerta de los Cuartos de Granada, Apr 2015 Apr 2015
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    Plaza de Armas

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

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    Plaza de Armas is the first terrace one reaches when entering Alcazaba through the series of gates. It is a beautiful terraced garden planted with a fountain at its centre and great views over Málaga. This landscaping is in fact a recent addition for, as its name indicates, it was originally used by the armed guards for defensive purposes. Up a few steps from here one reaches the fourth gate, Puerta de los Cuartos de Granada, which leads into the palace quarter.

    Address: Alcazaba de Málaga

    Plaza de Armas from below, Feb 2005 Plaza de Armas, Apr 2015
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    Torre del Cristo

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

    Though Jesus is a revered prophet in Islam, it is unusual to find a tower dedicated to him in a Moslem fortress. In this case, this tower (Torre del Cristo) was named as such after the Reconquest when the Catholics conducted a celebratory mass in it. Within the tower is the third gate into la Alcazaba de Málaga and it elands into Plaza de Arma.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Torre del Cristo, Apr 2015 Moorish window in Torre del Cristo, Apr 2015
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    Puerta de las Columnas

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

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    The use of Roman ruins as building material for the Alcazaba is most evident in Puerta de las Columnas, the second gateway into the fortress. The gate's name refers to the Roman columns used in its construction which are still visible to this day. This gate towards la Torre del Cristo, where the third gate lies.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Outer fa��ade of Puerta de las Columnas, Apr 2015 Roman column in Puerta de las Columnas, Feb 2005 Another Roman column, Feb 2005 Inner fa��ade, Apr 2015 Roman column, Apr 2015
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    Puerta de la Bóveda

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

    Named "Gate of the Vault," Puerta de la Bóveda is the first gateway into Alcazaba de Málaga. It was designed as a U-shaped gate to prevent attackers from crashing into it with momentum. Beyond this gate lies the second gate, Puerta de las Columnas.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Puerta de la B��veda, Apr 2015 Puerta de la B��veda, Apr 2015 Puerta de la B��veda, Apr 2015
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    Alcazaba de Málaga

    by MM212 Updated Apr 19, 2015

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    Alcazaba is perhaps the most important ancient monument in Málaga. Perched on a hill by the Mediterranean waters, dominating the old city, the fortress was first built in the 8th century over ruins of Roman structures, shortly after the arrival of the Arabs into the Iberian Peninsula. Materials from these Roman ruins were used to build Alcazaba and are still visible to this day. Much of the existing walls, however, date from the 11th century when the fortress was reinforced. Alcazaba was in fact the residential quarters of the rulers, while higher up the hill, el Castillo de Gibralfaro served as the military and defensive complex. The interior of Alcazaba consists of fortified walls, gardens, terraces, and the Nasrid Palace quarters, each of which described separately on this page. Within the Nasrid Palace is an archeological museum displaying Roman, Phoenician, and other artefacts found in Málaga over the years.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Alcazaba de M��laga, Feb 2005 Feb 2005 la Alcazaba, Apr 2015
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  • kaloz's Profile Photo

    Seaside on the Alcazaba

    by kaloz Written Feb 21, 2015

    Exiting the tunnel, we arrived at a lush garden that has grown up by the walls that once protected the city. It is a lovely garden setting with walkways and stairs just filled with the flora of the area. It is the most beautiful defenses that I have ever seen. Do not miss.

    Address: Calle Alcazabilla, 2

    Directions: Past the tunnel monkey toward the sea.

    Phone: +34 630 93 29 8

    Website: http://www.malagaturismo.com/es/recursos-turisticos/detalle/alcazaba/6

    Tower Kids Stairs Peg and Gil Stairs
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    Beautiful Defenses

    by kaloz Written Feb 19, 2015

    We are moving from the Muslim Plaza de la Merced to the Moorish Palace known as Alcazaba. Yes the Moors are Muslim in faith, I know, I know. The walking tour does not go in, we are headed up toward the walls which nowadays are guarded by worms and a tunnel monkey (painted in the tunnel). This is a very beautiful place with the climate that encourages flowers and plants. As we ascend the Plaza Jesús el Rico we are attacked by worms. Fortunate that these fearsome creatures are slow moving, we hurry past toward the tunnel that will take us to the sea side of the fortress. The tunnel is guarded by a monkey with crazy glasses which are too psychedelic so we are able to sneak past.

    Address: Calle Alcazabilla, 2

    Directions: from the Plaza de la Merced we head for the Plaza Jesús el Rico and climb toward the walls.

    Phone: +34 630 93 29 87

    Website: http://www.malagaturismo.com/es/recursos-turisticos/detalle/alcazaba/6

    Looking at the Alcazaba Worms Tunnel Monkey
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The best bit...at least, for me....

    by leics Written Mar 6, 2014

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    Malaga's Alcazaba is simply super. It is actually the best-preserved (albeit restored and partially reconstructed) alcazaba in Spain, although it is nowhere near as vast as the Alhambra nor is it as beautifully detailed and decorated. But it's still an excellent introduction to the architecture of the rich at the height of Moorish Spain, most certainly worth its very reasonable entrance fee and absolutely a 'must-see' imo.

    In fact, it is the one sight for which I made a bee-line on my first daytrip to Malaga..a lovely sunny day, which made exploring particularly pleasant.

    The complex dates from the 1000s, when it was more of a defensive structure than a palace. It has two inner 'courtyard' areas and was originally joined with the encircling city defensive wall...some parts of this still remain. Over the centuries much rebuilding and extending was done, with the original defensive elements remaining but luxurious apartments added.

    There are a series of gates and rather lovely 'gardens'...all quite small but, with their central fountains, one can easily imagine the ruling classes (especially the women) enjoying the shady, breezy hilltop location during the summer heat. There are still excellent views out to sea and inland but, of course, in the heyday of the Alcazaba those views would have been so much more pleasant!

    The beautiful and complex stuccowork ...and probably the intricate wooden ceilings.... which you can still see in some of the palace rooms was much restored in the 1930s but, even if it isn't all original, it does give a valid impression of how beautiful this place once was.

    The Romans were in Malaga long before the Moors and much Roman stonework was re-used in the Alcazaba's construction and foundations of the Roman fort were used when it was first built.. As well as various column bases and pillars incorporated into the structure itself various Roman altars and other chunks of masonry are displayed alongside he path (I'd guess these chunks have been found during various more recent excavations in the city).

    Restoration is ongoing..as are excavations.... so you are unlikely to be able to access all of the Alcazaba complex but there is more than enough to occupy you for at least a couple of hours.

    Highly recommended.

    Open Tuesday to Sunday
    Summer: 9.30am to 8pm
    Winter: 8.30am to 7.30 pm
    Mondays 9.00am to 6.00 pm

    Entrance is 2.20 euro (as I recall) which is remarkably cheap. You can avoid the climb up the hill by taking a lift, which costs a bit extra and is accessed from Calle Guillen Sotelo.

    Address: Calle Alcazabilla

    Directions: Signed within the city centre.

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Alcazaba entrance One of the courtyard gardens Roman altars Wooden ceiling Restored decorated ceiling
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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    ALCAZABA

    by draguza Written Jul 2, 2013

    An old Arabic fortress that dominates the city from its vantage point on the hill above the bay, it has now become a symbol of the modern city and an important tourist attraction. Sultan Badis, ruler of the Moorish province of Granada was responsible for having it built. It was declared a national heritage site in 1931. Restoration work began the same year and was completed in 1947. It's well worth wandering around the site to see how even earlier Roman remains were incorporated into the Moorish building work, and there are attractive gardens where you can sit and rest

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba Palace

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 30, 2011

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    The meaning of the name in Arabic is citadel. It was built in 11th century by Moors, from what was a large Roman fort beforehand. The castle gradually climbs the hill for about 300 feet, and connects to Gibralfaro Fort above it. There is an archaeological museum inside and there is an outer and inner citadel, beside water theme, ponds, and gardens/flowers. Entry is through Christ's Door at the bottom level at Plaza de la Auana. The castle is patterned after the Alhambra of Granada, but not as big or ornate, however has less tourists. The castle is closed Mondays and other days open 9:30-6PM in winter and until 8PM in summer months.

    Address: C/ Alcazabilla

    Phone: + 34 952 22 72 30

    Panorama view of the castle Close up view of the high walls View of the castle walls through the foliage View of the well preserved defense walls
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