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Entrance Ticket to Brunel's ss Great Britain
"The entrance ticket to Brunel's SS Great Britain allows you to explore cabins saloons and access all areas of the ship to take in the sights sounds and smells of a Victorian voyage. Climb the rigging dress up in Victorian costumes and see a working replica of the engine. Head below the ship where desert-like conditions preserve the hull. Don’t miss the Dockyard Museum which takes visitors through a million miles spent at sea and 170 years of fascinat you will be able to purchase a dockyard companion which will give you more information about your visitor experience and the SS Great Britain’s fascinating history.Descend ‘under water’ in the Dry Dock to see the spectacular sights of the ship’s and the high-tech glass ‘sea’ now protecting the oldest iron hull in the world. Follow this with a visit to the Dockyard Museum where you can view archive film footage which captures the excitement and emotion of the SS Great Britain’s homecoming. Here you can also take the time to discover the highs and lows of the ship’s dramatic history
From GBP14.00
 
City Sightseeing Oxford Hop-On Hop-Off Tour
"Hop aboard your City Sightseeing open-air bus from any of the 20 routed stops that are conveniently situated around the city. Take a seat inside or on the open-air top deck then sit back and relax as you ride through Oxford home to the oldest university in the English-speaking world.With your 24- or 48-hour ticket choose to stay on the bus for the entire loop or hop on and off at any of the stops to explore the city’s sights. See the Itinerary for a list of stops. As you travel plug into the informative audio commentary and admire the timeworn honey-colored buildings.Perhaps hop off at the New Road stop to visit Oxford Castle. Learn how the medieval Norman castle was mostly destroyed during the English Civil War
From GBP14.00
 
City Sightseeing Bath Hop-On Hop-Off Tour
"With great views from the top of the bus strategically placed stops and an interesting commentary this truly is the best way to see the sights of Bath.On this City Sightseeing tour you can hop-on and off as many times as you like aboard the open-top double-decker bus. There are 15 stops and the entire route takes approximately 45 minutes. The bus departs every 10 - 30 minutes from each stop. Tickets are valid for 24 hours from firs The Royal Crescent The Circus Great Pulteney Street and Pulteney Bridge
From GBP15.00

Clifton Suspension Bridge Tips (26)

Clifton Suspension Bridge

The Clifton Suspension Bridge is the symbol of the city of Bristol. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel he never lived to see it completed, Brunel died prematurely aged 53 yrs in 1859, and the Bridge was completed as his memorial and finally opened in 1864.

February 2010

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grayfo
Apr 19, 2010

high in the sky

Clifton Suspension Bridge is really something. I have a chronic fear of heights and had to hold my daughter's hand when we drove across it. She and her father then parked and walked back over it, leaving me in the car, while they took photos.
The bridge crosses the Avon linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset, England. It was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, though he did not live to see its completion. It was built 1862-64. It has a span of 600 feet, and the original plan was to have Egyptian style towers at either end, but instead the rock was left in its natural state.
It is a toll bridge.

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uglyscot
May 22, 2009

Golden Gate of Bristol!

The Clifton Suspension Bridge is the top sight for visitors in Bristol. For me it’s like the Golden Gate for San Francisco. High over the Avon River, at 75meters, it spans the Avon Gorge. It’s a beautiful bridge that becomes more beautiful during the night when it’s all lit up. It was designed by the famous engineer Isambard Brunel in 1830 (he also designed the SS Great Britain boat and the train station). The bridge started to built in 1836 but Brunel died in 1859. The bridge finally finished 5 years later in 1864. The height of towers is 26meters above deck while the span is 214 meters.

We had some nice views of the bridge from the Observation Hill while we were watching the sunset. At the same moment we noticed many children playing on the slide (the water on it was turned into ice). Extreme sports!...

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mindcrime
Apr 26, 2009

simply gorgeous

The Clifton Suspension Bridge is the Bristolian icon, so I suppose my Bristol page isn’t complete without something about it. Bristol is a city of many bridges, of hugely varying interest, beauty and utility and whereas the suspension bridge rates high for the first two criteria it is actually of very little practical value, which accounts for the extremely long story of it’s construction: over a hundred years elapsing between the idea of spanning the Avon Gorge and it’s opening. Basically, it doesn’t really go anywhere important.

After a local merchant made a bequest for the constuction of the bridge in the eighteenth century nothing much happened until 1830 when a competition was announced for designs for a bridge. After a great deal of finagling Brunel suceeded in getting the commission. Work was started but after constructing the abutments and towers the money ran out: the structure languished in this state for a couple of decades before, upon IKB's untimely death, the idea of completing the bridge as a memorial was conceived. It's not quite Brunel's original design: originally the Egyptianesque towers were to be adorned with sphinxes and cast-iron plaques celebrating the manufacturing arts, the roadway is wider than originally conceived and the suspension chains and saddles were recycled from Brunel's Hungerford footbridge over the Thames near Charing Cross. (the saddles were an innovative feature actually devised by Isembard's father Marc, who in many ways is a more important figure in the history of technology that his son)

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TheLongTone
Feb 27, 2009
 
 
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Clifton suspension bridge

The bridge is simply an awesome piece of engineering. Based on a design by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, it was completed in 1864. It spans more than 200m. On the side away from Bristol, there is a portakabin with a little (free) museum examining the history of the bridge.

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Gyppo
Mar 02, 2008

St. Vincent's Cave

The Clifotn Suspension Bridge and the observatory with the camera obscura are already two sights worth a visit. But the third one at this place is somewhat hidden. In the observatory, you will also find the entrance to a natural cave, St. Vincent's cave. Via a long and tight staircase, you can ascend to this cave and have a marvelous look onto the Avon gorge. Once, there was a chapel on this place, but this fell into the gorge due to errosion. The cave itself looks somewhat shabby, unfortunately many tourists have left traces in from of "I was here" - writings and rubbish. The main point is the view!

Entrance fee is one pound (as far as I can remember) and has to be paid at the same desk as the fee for the camera obscura. The desk seemed somewhat strange to me without any kind of decoration and a friendly cashier watching TV. Please be aware, that due to the staircase, this place is surely not suitable for children and people who have difficulties to walk. There is even an age restriction for children, but as I had the required age, I can't remember that.

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Airpunk
Oct 16, 2006

Camera Obscura

This camera obscura is the only one open to the public in England. It was built into an old windmill which ceased operations in 1777. After the windmill was redesigned into an observatory, the camera obscura was installed in 1829.

After paying a small entry fee (I think it was 2,00 pounds), you have to climb up the stairs up to the "dark chamber". A lens, installed on the roof, projects the bridge and the Avon gorge onto the vaulted table in the middle of the room. As you may assume, it is dark inside, so be careful when you enter. There is no guide or operator inside - you have to move the device on your own to see all the surrounding areas.

The entrance to a natural cave is also located in the same building. I think that the entrance fee for that, which you have to pay at the same desk, was 1,00 pound.

In my opinion, both were worth a visit - these two attractions enable you to see the beautiful landscape in a different way.

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Airpunk
Oct 15, 2006

Avon Gorge and Clifton Rocks Railway

Bristol is perhaps not the most beautiful city, but this does not mean that it doesn't have beautiful city- or landscapes. If you walk along the right bank or River Avon, you will come to the Avon Gorge. Look at those big cliffs and enjoy the sight for a moment (For this, you have to ignore the traffic of hotwell road).

Here, you will also find the lower station of Clifton Rocks railway, a funicular railway which led from Clifton down to Hotwell Road. It was openmed in 1893, but closed again in 1934. After it served as air raid shelter as well as office for the BBC and airline BOAC during WWII, it was abandoned. There is still a group of people interested in restoring this funicular railway, but chances seem to be low to see it ever operating again.

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Airpunk
Oct 13, 2006
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TheLongTone

"Alright my lover?"
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mindcrime

"Far beyond the shrinking skies"
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KennetRose

"Brissle - a gert lush areal!"
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JuliaK

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Clifton Suspension Bridge

Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a great influence on Bristol by designing Bristol's new train terminal, two steamships and the suspension bridge in Clifton. There were already plans to build a bridge over this place of the Avon Gorge in 1754. However, costs, riots, long discussions and further discomfort led to a delay until 1830, when a design presendet by Brunel won the race. One reason for that was probably the use of egyption-styled towers - at a time where egyptology became famous and popular. However, this egyptian influence is not really obvious today as the sphinxes were not placed on top of the towers due to budget reasons. After funds ran out in 1843, further construction was stopped and the material was used to build another Brunel-designed bridge in Plymouth. Brunel died in 1859 and it was decided to complete the Clifton Suspension Bridge as a kind of monument for Brunel. The chains from Hungerfor Suspension Bridge (a Brunel-designed bridge in London which was demolished in 1860) were purchased and further funds were raised. In 1864, the bridge was finished and opened for public. Pedestrian and cyclists can cross the bridge for free, but a small fee must be paid by road vehicles.

Do not miss to visit the vistor's center or have a look from spectator's park (see main picture). Today, the bridge is one of Bristol's best known monuments, although it is a little far away from the city center. The beautiful landscape of the Avon Gorge, two small attractions close to the Bridge (a natural cave and a camera obscura) and the fancy district of Clifton makes it an interesting, but still not crowded place. If you like to walk, ascend/descend via a small path which you will find at the southern part of the bridge. It will lead you to the eastern bank of river Avon. Down there, there's a lot of traffic, but a nice view on the Avon Gorge. You will find the path leading down from the small terrace or leading up ... see below.

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Airpunk
Oct 13, 2006

Suspension Bridge

I can't say that visiting a suspension bridge would ever be high on my list of 'must see's' but this one is pretty spectacular, especially when you realise it's quite old!

You can drive over it for 30p (silver coins only and no 5p's!) or walk over it for free. It's got good views and a few walks either side of the bridge.

Worth a visit if you're in the area.

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coopergirl2003
Oct 04, 2006

Clifton Suspension Bridge

Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, this was one of the greatest engineering feats of its day. Unfortunately, I didn't have enough time to actually walk on it. But is provides some magnificent views of the Avon gorge below.

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Tom_Fields
Jul 09, 2006

Clifton Suspension Bridge

One of the first things I wanted to see in Bristol as I am fascinated by the industrial revolution period in England was the famous bridge at Clifton and I was not disappointed. It was shorter than I expected (215 metres) but impressive enough, spanning 75 metres above the Avon Gorge. We walked across it and the wind is strong up there so hold on to any hats you may wear :))) You can walk in the observatory park above the bridge and see it from all possible angles too. Not surprisingly, it is one of the more popular places in Bristol for suicides and there are plaques with "depression help line" numbers on the bridge which is a bit bizarre but probably helps a few. I prefered to read the information on Brunel himself and see pictures with decorations from various jubilees. Originally, the bridge was meant to have sphinxes on the towers since it was drawn up when Egypt was a huge influence on architecture, but money ran out.

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Sjalen
Mar 04, 2006

Things to Do Near Clifton Suspension Bridge

Things to Do

Clifton Observatory, Camera Obscura and Caves

On my way to see Suspension bridge I walked through this nice park (pic 1) at the Observatory hill. Where the bus dropped me I noticed the nice Christ church(pic 2) and then I walked up the hill to...
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Things to Do

Bristol Zoo Gardens

I know opinions are divided about zoos but if you're going to have them then the Bristol Zoological Gardens is one of the best. First founded in 1835 it is the fifth oldest zoo in the world but it...
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Things to Do

Bristol Packet Boat Trips

Bristol Packet Boat Trips offer a variety of cruises and boats are available for hire. I participated in the City Docks Tour which is approximately 1.5 hours around the Floating Harbour. Tickets and...
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Things to Do

Georgian House Museum

This, as the name suggests, is an eighteenth century house: built in 1780 for John Pinney, a Bristolian who had amassed a fortune from sugar plantations in the West Indies. Four of its six floors are...
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Things to Do

Red Lodge Museum

The Red Lodge is one of those small but exquisite places. Its a Tudor house dating from around 1580, and its glory is the three oak-panlled rooms on the first floor, which are all as built. The...
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Things to Do

Lord Mayor's Chapel aka St. Mark's

Unusually for an English church the Lord Mayor’s Chapel does not present as a stand-alone building: rather the West wall and entrance is integrated into a street facade. Directly across College Green...
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Getting to Clifton Suspension Bridge

Address

Bridgemaster's Office, Bridge Road, Bristol BS8 3PA

Hours

  • Sunday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Monday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Tuesday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Wednesday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Thursday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Friday 10:00 to 17:00
  • Saturday 10:00 to 17:00

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