River Thames, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 116 Reviews

River Thame through London to the North Sea.
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  • A traffic free walk,busy with people.
    A traffic free walk,busy with people.
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  • River Thames
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  • River Thames
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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Along the River Thames

    by mallyak Updated Sep 18, 2008

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    The River Thames runs through London and is the reason why London is located where it is. So many of the buildings that one associates with London are built along its banks: the river has certainly seen most of the great historical events of the past 2000 years of London's history.
    In Central London you will find a wide choice of passenger boats plying the piers between Westminster and the Thames Barrier. Palaces, docks, cathedrals and churches, great bridges, theatres and museums all jostle for attention. Here one can spend many happy days exploring the city’s rich past

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  • HackneyBird's Profile Photo

    Be a Mudlark for a Day.

    by HackneyBird Written Apr 29, 2014

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    A Mudlark was the name given to someone who, in the late 18th and 19th centuries, scavenged the muddy foreshore along the River Thames at low tide. Usually children, Mudlarks would sear for anything of value that could be re-sold. Becoming a Mudlark was usually due to poverty and lack of skills, and working conditions were dirty and uncomfortable as excrement and waste, and sometimes the corpses of humans, dogs and cats would wash up on the shore of the river. Their income was little more than meagre and, when the opportunity arose, they would steal from the boats and barges moored on the river.

    Today there are still Mudlarks on the banks of the Thames, although these modern day scavengers use metal detectors for which a permit is required from the Port of London Authority.

    Anyone can walk on the foreshore of the Thames and pick up items on the surface which does not require a permit, but scraping the foreshore with any kind of implement is considered digging and will require a permit.

    If you find anything which you think might be of archaeological interest you should report your find to the Portable Antiquities Scheme Finds Liaison Officer at the Museum of London (020 7814 5733). If you think your find could be treasure you should notify the coroner for the district it was found in within 14 days of making the find. Reporting treasures to the Finds Liaison Officer is also acceptable.

    Anyone going onto the foreshore does so at their own risk and must take responsibility for their own safety and that of anyone with them. In addition to the tide, which rises and falls over 7m twice a day, and the current, which is very fast, there are more less obvious dangers to be aware of such as raw sewerage, used hypodermic needles, broken glass and wash from vessels. In addition the steps down to the foreshore can be slippery and are not always maintained. Also please be aware of the possibility of Well's Disease which is spread by rat's urine in the water. The infection is usually contracted through cuts in the skin or through the eyes, nose or mouth. The symptoms are flu-like and medical attention should be sought immediately if you experience any ill effects after your visit to the foreshore.

    If you are going Mudlarking please take the appropriate precautions:
    * Wear sensible shoes and thick gloves.
    * Don't go alone.
    * Carry a mobile phone.
    * Watch the tide.
    * Make sure that steps are close by.
    * Always make sure you can get off the foreshore quickly.
    * Make sure you wash your finds in clean water as soon as possible.

    Stay safe and happy Mudlarking!

    Address: Foreshore of the River Thames.

    Directions: Anywhere along the River Thames except for the foreshore at the Tower of London.

    Walking on the foreshore. Beware the tides and currents. Modern day Mudlarks River Thames from South Bank. River Thames from the Millenium Bridge.
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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Thames Barrier

    by easyoar Written May 21, 2006

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    The Thames is a very long river. It flows through Henley, Reading and various other towns on the way to the sea. At these points it is very much just a normal river. However by the time it reaches East London, the river has become tidal, and when the sea rises, the water rushes back up the Thames. In periods of heavy flow, this can cause major flooding. It has not been unknown for The Houses of Parliament to flood! The Thames Barrier was built to stop the back flow when the tide rises from happening. Most of the time the Barrier appears to just be a series of pillars in the river, but if needed, hidden metal gates rise up from the river bed stopping the surge of water from the sea.

    Even though the Barrier is now over 20 years old, I still find it quite futuristic looking and a sight often missed by tourists that visit London (partly because it is a fair way from the centre). Some people reckon it is best seen by boat, but I like the side on view as seen here, where you can see the boat "City of London" sailing through one of the central gates in the barier. The birds in the foreground are Cormorants. My second picture just shows the Barrier with no boat.

    The Barrier measures over 0.5 km from bank to bank. The four central openings in the barrier are 61m and these are the main navigable openings. The four main gates that fill these four navigable openings are huge and over 20m high and weigh (together with their counterweights around 3700 tonnes each!) Adjacent to the four main gates are two similar but smaller gates (just 31m across). The remaining four gates are not navigable and these are the omes next to the riverbanks.

    There's a good web page: http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/regions/thames/323150/335688/341764/ that describes the Thames Barrier in great detail.

    Address: Near Millennium Dome

    Directions: North Greenwich on the Jubilee Line

    Thames Barrier with boat passing through Thames Barrier
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    • Sailing and Boating

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  • sylvie-uk's Profile Photo

    the river Thames

    by sylvie-uk Updated Sep 15, 2004

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    The river Thames runs from the sea to Teddington and is just under 100 miles.
    Despite it s murky appearance, it has over a hundred fish species including salmon.
    There are plenty of different cruises to do on the Thames, just use seach engine on your server and type "cruises river Thames" and choose the one for you.

    river Thames

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  • Cham's Profile Photo

    Walk Along the Thames

    by Cham Written Apr 10, 2006

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    The Thames River runs through the city and splits london into north and south. Along the south bank you can almost walk alongside the whole river and you'll see many sights. I suggest doing this at night time as you'll see all the lights of the city reflecting against the water. Some of the highlights of the river are Tower Bridge (the one the American's thought they were buying when they bought london bridge (which the original now resides in arizona), the tower of london, the millenium bridge leading to st pauls and the city; westminster bridge from which you can see the london eye, big ben and houses of parliament. plus many restaurants and bars along the riverside, the tate modern and a spectactular view from any of the bridges.

    Directions: most of the stations on the bottom of the circle line are near the river.

    South Bank at Night city of london at night
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  • St_Vincent's Profile Photo

    Photo opportunities at the Golden Jubilee Bridges

    by St_Vincent Updated Jan 19, 2006

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    Downstream View

    One of my favourite views of the City skyline is from the Hungerford Footbridge facing downstream, this is the left hand side looking from Embankment or the right hand side from the South Bank. I need to explain this because there are in fact two separate bridges running either side of the original 1846 railway bridge. Since 2002 these have been known as the Golden Jubilee Bridges. The downstream view shows Cleopatra's Needle, Somerset House, St Paul's Cathedral, the Oxo Tower and two of the highest buildings in London, the Swiss Re Building (the Gherkin) and Tower 42 (the old Nat West Tower). Great views on a clear day, unfortunately it was a bit overcast when I took these photos but they have come out fairly well. Also at the present time (Jan 06) many of the buildings on the South Bank are being refurbished so the view is not very inspiring.

    Directions: The bridges run between Charing Cross/Embankment underground station on one side to the South Bank, close to the London Eye, on the other.

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  • St_Vincent's Profile Photo

    Photo opportunities at the Golden Jubilee Bridges

    by St_Vincent Updated Jan 19, 2006

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    Upstream View.

    The Hungerford Footbridge is in fact two separate bridges running either side of the original 1846 railway bridge carrying trains into Charing Cross Station. Since 2002 these have been known as the Golden Jubilee Bridges. The upstream facing bridge gives great views of both the London Eye and the Houses of Parliament. These photos are even darker that the one's I took looking downstream but I will return in the summer and get some better ones. Look out for the two vessels moored on the Embankment side which are actually floating bars.

    Directions: The bridges run between Charing Cross/Embankment underground station on one side to the South Bank, close to the London Eye, on the other.

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    A little piece of Australia in London

    by scottishvisitor Updated Feb 28, 2006

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    Home to the Australian High Commission this building is the oldest diplomatic Australian mission abroad. King George opened the building on 23rd. August 1918. which was designed by the Scottish Arcitect Marshal MacKenzie. Hundreds of thousands of British people sought & won a new home in Australia - this place was the beginning of their journey.

    Address: The Strand

    Designed by a Scot
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  • csordila's Profile Photo

    Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race

    by csordila Updated Jun 12, 2009

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    Being the most remarkable educational centres of the world, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge fight an intellectual race in the whole year. On an exceptional day, however, they use their body instead of their head – the battle is going on on Thames at this time.

    The first competition, founded by two friends, Charles Merivale learning in Cambridge and the Oxford student, Charles Wordsworth, the nephew of the famous poet William Wordsworth was organized in 1829, and turned into an international event by today.

    You have to join to the 250 000 enthusiastic fans on the coast or to the millions of tv viewers and enjoy the exciting fight of muscles! Be glad on the end, that you are not the helmsman of the winning team. They show their gratitude to him for the victory by thrown him into the ice cold water of the Thames.

    Update: Oxford beat Cambridge on the 2009 Boat Race (155th) by three-and-a-half lengths in a time of 17mins 0secs.

    Address: London, Putney

    Directions: Between Putney Bridge & Mortlake on River Thames on Sunday March 29th, 2009 at 3:40pm.

    Website: http://www.theboatrace.org/

    Boat Race Course Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Thames

    by kris-t Updated Jan 31, 2011

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    The Thames has a length of 346 kilometres (215 statute miles) with its source near the village of Kemble in the Cotswolds; it then flows through Oxford (where it is called the Isis, a truncation of its Latin name), Reading, Maidenhead, Eton and Windsor.

    From the time it leaves Wiltshire, where it rises, it has traditionally formed the county boundary, firstly between Berkshire on the south bank and Oxfordshire on the north, then between Berkshire and Buckinghamshire, Buckinghamshire and Surrey, Surrey and Middlesex, and between Essex and Kent. From the outskirts of Greater London, it passes Syon House, Hampton Court, and Richmond (with the famous view of the Thames from Richmond Hill), and Kew, before it passes through London proper, then Greenwich and Dartford before entering the sea in a drowned estuary, The Nore.

    Part of the area west of London is sometimes termed the Thames Valley whilst east of Tower Bridge development agencies and Ministers have taken to using the term Thames Gateway.

    Address: London

    The Thames The Thames The Thames The Thames The Thames
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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Rubbish Collector on Thames

    by easyoar Updated May 24, 2006

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    This device may look a little strange. It looks like someone has dumped some sort of floating device on the Thames near St Pauls Cathedral. In actual fact it is a rubbish collector. It claims to collect 40 tonnes of rubbish a year. This is equivalent to 800,000 platic bottles. Who throws this much crap into the river anyway. It's a shame things like this are even needed. The worst thing I have encountered in a river was a dead sheep, mostly due to the stench and the fact that I rowed into it, but I guess that wasn't thrown in because someone couldn't be bothered to find a bin.

    This isn't the only weird boat thing on the Thames. There is another boat called the "Thames Bubbler" which goes up and down the Thames bubbling water into the river to help oxygenate it and make it healthier for fish and water life.

    The second photo shows the message on the boat.

    Address: On the Thames near St Pauls Cathedral

    Directions: On the Thames near St Pauls Cathedral. Walk down to the footbridge, and look down...

    Rubbish Collector on Thames (1 of 2) Rubbish Collector on Thames - explanation (2 of 2)
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  • scotlandscotour's Profile Photo

    River Thames - Beautiful Walkways

    by scotlandscotour Written Jun 14, 2004

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    I need open space in cities - so in London I gravitate towards the parks and the River.

    Ever wondered why it is always River Thames and not Thames River?

    Pronounced Tems, by the way.

    Best way to see many of the icons of London - Tower of London, London Eye, Tower Bridge, Westminster, Parliament, Flood Barriers, Greenwich, Docklands, ...

    If you cannot walk the distance, take a cruise.

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    The Thames

    by Marpessa Updated Feb 14, 2005

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    Well, while the water of the Thames may not be the cleanest in the world, it is a nice place to stroll along on a summer's day. On the banks of the Thames there is always something going on, plus there are quite a few cruises going up and down the river.

    There are also many walk bridges spanning across the bridge, from which you can get great views of the city around you.

    Address: Middle of London

    Directions: South of Big Ben, north of the London Eye, spreading out from east to west!

    Website: http://www.visitthames.co.uk/

    The Thames
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  • J.I.M's Profile Photo

    Walk along the River Thames!

    by J.I.M Written Jan 25, 2005

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    The Thames is a great river to walk along. You'll often find lots of people jogging along it throughout the day. The best place to walk along (in my opinion) is the north bank from Tower Hill to St Paul's Cathedral, then across the Millenium Bridge and walk along the south bank from the Tate Modern building to the London Eye and then finally across to the Houses of Parliament.

    The River Thames
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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    View From The River...

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jun 3, 2011

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    We took the Thames River cruise that was included with our Big Bus Tour. It started at Tower of London pier and ended at the pier by the Parliament. It was absolutely freezing in early June but we enjoyed it anyway. Not very long, but enough of a taste of the river for me.

    Departure times vary, but are approximately every 20 minutes in the Summer and every 30-40 minutes in the Winter. You can board Tower Pier, Westminster Pier or Waterloo Pier.

    There are several other companies that offer river tours as well:

    Bateaux London - 7695 1800 - has dinner cruises with cabaret and dancing and a Sunday lunch cruise.

    Thames Cruises - 7928 9009 - has evening disco cruises.

    Thames River Services - 7930 4097 - has trips between Westminster and Greenwich.

    Catamaran Cruisers - 7695 1800 - departss Westminster Pier hourly (11 a.m. - 6 p.m.) for a 50 minute circular cruise with commentary in 9 languages. Also point-to-point hop-on/hop-off throught the day with boats leaving from Embankment, Waterloo (London Eye), Bankside, Tower, and Greenwich.

    I've previously taken the trip to Greenwich which I really enjoyed. I recommend taking even a short cruise to get a different perspective of London from the river.

    Website: http://www.bigbustours.com/eng/london/custompage.aspx?id=river_cruise

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    • Photography
    • Sailing and Boating

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