St. Paul's Cathedral, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 287 Reviews

St. Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD +44 20 7246 8350
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    London's Anglican Cathedral

    by EasyMalc Updated Apr 25, 2016

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    The two best known churches in London have to be Westminster Abbey and St. Paul’s Cathedral, so if you only have time to visit one, which one should you choose?
    Architecturally, they are very different. Whereas Westminster Abbey is medieval and Gothic, St. Paul’s is 17th cent and has been described as English Baroque, which seems a fair description to me even though I’m no expert on architectural terms. Depending on your preferences, that may help you to make a decision on which one to choose, but of course the differences don’t end there.
    Compared to the Norman design of Westminster Abbey the present St. Paul’s Cathedral is quite young in comparison and the reason is, as many people will already know, was that Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to build a new church after the Great Fire of London of 1666.
    What perhaps not so many people know though, is that the church that was here before then was also Norman and was one of the biggest in Europe, if not the world, with a spire that reached close to 150m high. It wasn’t just the height of the church that made it impressive but also its length, so as you can imagine Wren had his work cut out to compete with that, and it definitely wasn’t all plain sailing.
    Obviously, you can read more about the history of the Cathedral and Sir Christopher Wren elsewhere, so I’ll concentrate on some of the more practical things that you should know about when visiting this City of London landmark.
    Being slap bang in the centre of London means that getting here by public transport is really easy. Entering the Church is through the magnificent West Front and all the relevant information is available on the website which I recommend that you should take a look at before you come here.
    Sundays are reserved for worship only, but if, like me, you just want to visit the Cathedral to marvel at its architecture, then please note that photography is not permitted.
    It costs a hefty £18 for a full paying adult (Apr 2016 and concessions apply). If you travel to London by train check to see if you can get a 2for1 voucher at http://www.daysoutguide.co.uk/st-pauls-cathedral
    When you enter the Cathedral and take in the view down the nave you may not initially be as overwhelmed as you thought you might be, but the further down the church you go the more impressive it becomes.
    One thing I have to point out, especially for anyone not interested in British colonialism, is that the church is full of memorials to British military achievements. Much of this is down in the Crypt, but you should still come down here to see the tombs of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington - and of course Sir Christopher Wren himself. There are also other notable people’s remains down here, as well as memorials to many famous British people. It has to be said though that I reckon that Westminster Abbey has many more famous names, from an international point of view than St. Paul’s.
    If you have the stamina you can climb the steps up to the galleries, which I have to confess I didn’t have the time (or inclination for).
    There’s no doubt that St. Paul’s Cathedral is a marvellous building with plenty of history, especially if you’re British. Apart from the people I’ve already mentioned, Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral was held here as was Margaret Thatcher’s - and of course Princess Diana married Prince Charles here.
    So do I recommend Westminster Abbey or St. Paul’s Cathedral? I’m bound to say both because they are so different, but if I jump off the fence for a moment I would have to choose Westminster Abbey, but that in no way implies that you should give St. Paul’s a miss if you have enough time.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    An expensive place to visit

    by gordonilla Written Feb 14, 2016

    We had put off visiting St Paul's Cathedral as it was quite an expensive place to visit. However, with our Art Fund passes we got 50% discount. It was a cold day outside and the interior was warmer (just). We walked around the cathedral and then went to the galleries.

    There were a great many steps to climb but the views were worth it.

    You are not permitted to photograph within the cathedral! Which does seem odd as this is inconsistent across all of the Cathedrals we have visited in England over recent years.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: +44 (2)0 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

    Exterior John Wesley Rooftop View (1) Rooftop View (2) Rooftop View (3)

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    The Garden's of St Paul's

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 17, 2016

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    The garden's of St Paul's are not that big but they do have some interesting items in there. There's a rose garden and some benches at the side and at the north east side there are more benches which they don't get the sun so much as the front garden. The gardens are ideal place for a break.
    In the north east garden you will find the gilded statue of St Paul on a column and at that spot is the location of preaching to the public of the Christian faith. On the west corner of the garden is a statue of John Wesley a Methodist preacher.

    Outside of the gardens at the rear of the cathedral there's a water fountain.
    At the front of St Paul's garden by the rose garden is a statue named Becket and the artist is Bainbridge Copnall.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    The American Memorial Chapel

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 17, 2016

    Behind the High Altar is a semi circular Apse and it has the American Memorial chapel. The chapel s dedicated to the 28,000 American's who were killed in the UK during the Second World War. Where the memorial is memorial the names of the American soldiers are recorded in a 500 hundred page roll of honour. The memorial it was built in the same year as the High Altar in 1958.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    The High Altar @St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Updated Jan 17, 2016

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    The High Altar at St Paul's it was damaged during the Second World War and the one we see today it was completed in 1958 and is based on Sir Christopher's design.

    The High Altar is very ornate with wooden twisted columns on the corner and made of gilded oak. The altar table is made of Italian marble.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    St Faiths Chapel @t Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 17, 2016

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    St Faith's Chapel is located in the crypt of St Paul's Cathedral and contains a few monuments from the Old St Paul's and the graves of Bishop Creighton, Dean Milman, Cannon Liddon and Sir Aurthur Sullivan. St Faith’s it was a parish church that it was attached to St Paul’s cathedral and destroyed in the Great Fire of London an dis close to the foundations of the old church.
    In 1960 the chapel became home to the Order of the British Empire. Along the chapel stalls are banners of current knights and officers of of the order including HM The Queen. Who visits the chapel for the Queens ceremonial service.
    The chapel holds a service once a year on Ash Wednesday afternoon for the Stationers Company.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    The Views from the top of St Paul's

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 14, 2016

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    I get to visit St Paul's Cathedral on Lord Mayors show which is a free entry and as I have been there over four times now I have only climbed up to the whispering gallery and to golden gallery once due to the weather. Every year I go the weather it has been raining, windy and overclouding and for that reason alone I have only been once.I'm waiting for a clear day before I climb up again.

    As the entry to the cathedral on that day is free the climb to the galleries it does cost five pounds and at whispering gallery is the only place that you can't take any photos for health & safety issues.

    The dome is 111.3 metres high which it does makes it one of the largest cathedral domes in the world. There are three gallery levels. The first one the whispering gallery which is 257 steps up from the ground and you can walk all around it but is very narrow. The next level is the stone gallery which here they do offer a seating area for resting, before the final climb of 152 steps to the golden gallery which you do get superb views over London especially when the weather is clear. In total there are 528 steps from the cathedral floor to the golden gallery.

    First Photo: There are the two western towers topped with a pineapple , a symbol of peace, prosperity and hospitality overlooking Ludgate Circus and Fleet Street. You can see the parade going through at the same time.
    Second Photo:The views over River Thames, Tate Modern Gallery, and the Millennium Bridge or the Wobbly Bridge as it gets called as when it was first build the bridge it was very wobbly.
    Third Photo:The skyscrapers in the City of London.
    Fourth Photo:You can see Blackfriars bridge and the London Eye.
    Fifth Photo: is the last staircase from the stone gallery to the golden gallery with the remaining 152 steps.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    The Crypt @St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Updated Jan 14, 2016

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    St Paul’s crypt is the same as size as the upper church. It has a lot of monuments big and small and also a lot of memorial tablets on the wall. The oldest burial at St Pauls is Sebba who died in 677. Other burials in the crypt are Sir Christopher Wren’s, Lord Nelson’s coffin lies direct under the dome which is made from timber of a French ship he defeated in battle. Also in the crypt there’s a small chapel and half burnt statues that survived the Great Fire of London in 1666.
    First Photois a monument to Randolph Caldecott and it shows a child holding a medallion.
    Second PhotoSir Christopher's Wren tomb is on the south side of the crypt and a Latin epitaph above his tomb, written by his son it address us"Reader, if you seek his monument, look around you."
    Third photoLord Nelson's tomb which he had a state funeral.
    Fourth PhotoLord Wellington "The Iron Duke" tomb which is made of Cornish Casket.
    Fifth Photo One of the half burnt memorials that survived the Great Fire of London

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    Other Important Pieces @ St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Updated Jan 14, 2016

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    Except from all the statues, memorials and ,monuments are some other important items around the cathedral.
    First photo At the entrance you will come across the nave which is long and aisles on each side. The first thing I have noticed it was the 14th century white marble font carved by Francis Bird in 1726 Soon after you will come across two candlesticks which were part of the choir were made by Benedetto da Rovezzano for the tomb of Henry VIII. There are just further up from the font one on each side.
    Second photoThe original organ it was made in 1694 by a German builder called Bernard Schmidt. Frederick Handel loved playing on this organ as it had pedals. Over the years it had been rebuilt which the last time it was in 2008.Is also the third largest in UK with 7,256 pipes.
    t=Third photo a wooden carved cherub playing a trumpet.
    Fourth photo A sculpture by Henry Moore representing a mother and a child.
    Fifth photo A life size bronze sculpture by Nikola Hicks of a man holding another man. The sculpture it was made in 1993 at the height of the Bosnian war and is called Sorry, Sorry Sarajevo.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    Forgotten Tapestry @ St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 12, 2016

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    In 2014 in St Paul's Cathedral a tapestry went on display to mark a century since the First World War had started and it will be on show until 2018 the duration of the conflict. The tapestry it was made in the First World War by soldiers who were blinded, crippled and other injuries but mostly shell shocked when they have been encouraged by doctors to make this colourful creation.
    The forgotten tapestry as is called, as it was forgotten for so many years after it was finished it was on the top of the altar, but at the beginning of the Second World War they have put it in a safe place and is only now that it has been put back on display.

    The tapestry it has five panels which includes a Holy Grail in the centre and which it represents suffering and on each side there are two palm leaves signify victory. The tapestry is three metres wide. By the side there's a book with every soldiers name and St Paul's is hoping to track down relatives of the injured soldiers. One of them it was George Eades who was blinded in 1917 but became a finished artist in embroidery at St Dunstan’s Hospital in Kensington London.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    Monuments and Statues @St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Updated Jan 12, 2016

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    At St Paul's Cathedral there are so many monuments, statues and other memorial tablets.
    First photoOn the north side of the nave is the most unusual and biggest monument in the cathedral and is a monument to the Duke of Wellington who died in 1819 and is buried in the
    crypt.
    Second photoIs a memorial to Lord Kitchner a senior British officer who played a major role in the first World War but died half way through it.The sculptor it was Alfred Stevens.
    Third photo Major-General Gordon (1833-85), who died in at Khartum.
    Fourth photo A monument to Admiral Earl Howe sculptured by J Flaxman and Sir Christopher Wren.
    Fifth photo Statue of Joseph Mallord William Turner who had died in 1851 and buried in the crypt of the cathedral. The sculptor is Patrick McDowell.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    Interior of St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 11, 2016

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    I'm was fortunate to visit St Paul's Cathedral a few times over the years but I never paid for a visit.
    As the entry to the cathedral is very expensive I tend to go on Lord mayor's show that is free plus is the only day that you can take photos.

    The main doors of the cathedral on the west end of the nave are the great West Doors and is the ceremonial entrance reserved for the sovereign and for great occasions. On each side of the nave are the north and south aisles with monuments, statues and memorial of great heroes that played a major role in the English History.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    The Mosaics@ St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 11, 2016

    Most of the mosaics in St Paul's Cathedral are around the dome area. The spaces between the arches of the dome are beautifully decorated by colourful mosaics. The mosaics were designed by the artists Alfred Stevens and George Frederic Watts between 1864 and 1893.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    St Dunstan's Chapel@St Paul's Cathedral

    by Galaxy31 Written Jan 11, 2016

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    The Chapel of St Dunstan's is on the left aisle of the Cathedral, is small but a very important chapel.
    The chapel it was consecrated in 1699 and traditionally it was where the morning service of Mattins it was conducted on weekdays. Since more chapels have been constructed within the cathedral the morning service takes place in different chapels on a different days.

    The chapel it was dedicated to St Duncan in 1905, a Bishop of London who became the Archbishop in Canterbury in 959.The silver pyx that hangs above the altar contains the sacrament.

    Address: St Pauls Churchyard, EC4

    Directions: St Pauls tube.

    Phone: 0 20 7236 4128

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk

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    A Must Visit

    by Galaxy31 Updated Jan 11, 2016

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    Wren’s masterpiece and one of the most visited places in London to any visitor. Is believed to be one of the largest Cathedrals in the world with the highest dome at111.3 metres high and weighs approximately 65,000 tons.

    After the Great Fire of London in 1966 Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to rebuild St Paul’s Cathedral but not only this church and so many other churches around the City of London. St Paul’s Cathedral is the fifth church to be built on the site since 604 and at the highest point in the City. Is also the first Cathedral after the English Reformation in the sixteenth Century. The first wooden cathedral dedicated to St Paul’s was burned down in 675 and the second one it was destroyed by Vikings in 962. The third church which it was built in stone but destroyed again by fire in 1087 had to be demolished and rebuilt by the
    the Normans. During the English Civil war St Paul’s it has become dilapidated and was used as a stable for horses and the nave became a market place until 1660 when the monarchy it was restored. After the fire of 1666 the cathedral it was destroyed and as the structure it wasn’t safe it was demolished in 1668.
    The Cathedral it has taken thirteen years to build from 1675 to 1710 and services began in 1697. During the Second War St Paul’s Cathedral it was bombed but only the east end side was damaged were the present altar is now. The high altar it was built in 1958 and is made of marble and glided oak.
    The Cathedral it has a lot of War memorials and tombs of famous figures in London and around seven chapels dedicated to different regiments.

    The whispering gallery is thirty metres floor the Cathedral floor and it has 257 steps but is worth it to see the view from there into the cathedral. This is one of the places which you can’t take any photos. From the Whispering Gallery there are another 300 steps to the golden gallery. The steps up to the stone gallery which is the next one up from the whispering gallery are wide and easy to reach with alcoves seats which are great for a good rest. From here upwards the staircase is a small metal spiral which it does takes a bit more strength to climb but the views worth the climb. When I climbed to the stone gallery two years ago the weather it hasn’t been great and ever since on the Lord Mayors show t has been raining so I didn’t bother climbing it. But if ever is a sunny decent day on the day I will go back and see the views on a clear day.

    The price to enter St Paul’s Cathedral I know is very high at £18.00 a person £16.50 if you buy on line but as St Paul’s it doesn’t receive any grants from central Government or from the church it does needs to retrieve that money for is upkeep and everyday costs, as it costs about £13 million a year to fund. The entry charges do make a significant contribution towards the running costs and the rest is raised through different organisations and events that take place there.

    St Paul’s Cathedral is only free to enter on Lord Mayors Show but a visit to the gallery it needs to be paid at £5.00 a person.
    Photography is allowed on that day but I would say go during the parade as is quitter as most of the visitors would be watching the parade. I have been going to a lot of events that takes place there during the year as I do like the concerts they held during Christmas and Easter time. Last year I have attended Messia- George Frideric Handel which it was great to listen in such an amazing building. The tickets to most of the concerts are free but you need to get them early as they go very quick, but a donation is appreciated.

    Opening times are from 8.30am to 4.30pm Monday to Saturday and on Sunday is for worship only.

    Address: St Paul's Cathedral, St Paul's Churchyard, London,

    Website: http://www.stpauls.co.uk/

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