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City Sightseeing Bath Hop-On Hop-Off Tour
"With great views from the top of the bus strategically placed stops and an interesting commentary this truly is the best way to see the sights of Bath.On this City Sightseeing tour you can hop-on and off as many times as you like aboard the open-top double-decker bus. There are 15 stops and the entire route takes approximately 45 minutes. The bus departs every 10 - 30 minutes from each stop. Tickets are valid for 24 hours from firs The Royal Crescent The Circus Great Pulteney Street and Pulteney Bridge
From GBP15.00
 
City Sightseeing Bath Hop-On Hop-Off Tour
"With great views from the top of the bus strategically placed stops and an interesting commentary this truly is the best way to see the sights of Bath.On this City Sightseeing tour you can hop-on and off as many times as you like aboard the open-top double-decker bus. There are 15 stops and the entire route takes approximately 45 minutes. The bus departs every 10 - 30 minutes from each stop. Tickets are valid for 24 hours from firs The Royal Crescent The Circus Great Pulteney Street and Pulteney Bridge
From GBP15.00
 
"Bath
"Bath Stonehenge and The English Countryside Day Tour from London ""Leave London in the morning and beat the crowds to Stonehenge. Enjoy informative commentary along the way with the assistance of your knowledgeable guide. Arrive at Stonehenge and enjoy a walk around the ancient monoliths before it gets too busy. Take a admire the architecture and see the famous Pultney Bridge. Visit the Royal Crescent the Roman Baths and Bath Abbey (own expense). Try one of the many restaurants available for lunch. Ask your guide for a recommendation. Leave Bath to return to London arriving at approximately 6:30pm."""
From GBP64.00

Roman Baths Tips (124)

ROMAN BATHS - EARLY ROMAN PEOPLE

In the Museum was a display on the "People of Aquae Sulis"...The Roman name for Bath.

It was interesting to see the objects, like the stone head of a Lady from the 1 A., and to see how different they look to us! This head was saved from a Tomb and was in very good condition.
Look at the hairstyle, the style of the day back then, was it an "affro" in modern times?

There is more, even a complete skeleton and lots of tombstones showing a large range of people who lived in this area and died in Roman Bath.

balhannah's Profile Photo
balhannah
Dec 28, 2013

ROMAN BATHS - PLUNGE POOLS

Don't be mislead when here, NOT ALL THE POOLS HAVE HOT WATER!

The circular pool in my photo, is a 1.6 metre deep COLD plunge pool!

A cold plunge bath was a feature of many Roman bath houses, but rarely on this scale!

Into the hot pool, then the cold, brrrrr!!!!

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balhannah
Dec 28, 2013

ROMAN BATHS - THE TEMPLE

The Temple at Bath is one of only two truly classical temples known from Roman Britain. It was the place where the cult statue of the goddess Sulis Minerva was housed.
Not only is the ornamental pediment on display, but an animation of what it would have looked like long ago in Roman times!
The pediment carries the image of a fearsome head carved in Bath stone and it is thought to be the Gorgon’s head, which was a powerful symbol of the goddess Sulis Minerva.

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balhannah
Dec 28, 2013

ROMAN BATH'S TERRACE

What ever you do at the Baths, don't miss visiting "The Terrace."

The Terrace overlooks the Great Bath and is lined with statues of Roman Governors of Britain, Roman Emperors and military leaders from 1894, and it is from here that you have the BEST VIEW OF THE GREAT BATH.

The Roman Baths were discovered in the 19th century and cover a huge area, even extending under nearby streets and squares! The Statue's at the Baths were actually carved before the Roman Baths in 1897.

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balhannah
Dec 28, 2013
 
 
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ROMAN BATHS

This is what I wanted to see, I had heard and read so much about them.

We arrived at the entrance, paid our admission fee, were given a brochure and free audio-guide and we were on our way.

This is Britains only hot spring, a magnificent temple and bathing complex which was built by the Roman's. To this very day, it still flows with natural hot water. I sat on the edge of the Roman Bath, just to feel how hot the water was.

There is quite a lot to see here, so leave enough time to see all the Baths, Courtyards, Museum and the waters source.
I found it quite amazing to be walking on these old stones, where Roman's would had done many umpteen years before me.
The Museum has an extensive display of preserved treasures from the spring and are presented well.
You can even try a glass of Spa water from the fountain.

We visited late in the day, this turned out to be a real good idea, as there was hardly anybody here.
In July & August, the Baths are open from 10am - 9pm

Times vary a lot, so please check out this page...
http://visitbath.co.uk/things-to-do/attractions/roman-baths-p25681

ADMISSION IN 2014
http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/visiting/admission_charges.aspx

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balhannah
Dec 28, 2013

ROMAN BATHS - THE GREAT BATH

The Great Bath was where most people seemed to be. They were sitting on the edge, dipping their feet and hand's into the Water.

It is the centrepiece of the Roman baths, a pool lined with 45 sheets of lead, and filled with hot spa water directly from the Sacred Spring, providing a warm swim.
The bath is lined with 45 thick sheets of lead and is 1.6 metres deep, with access by steps that entirely surround the bath.
A large flat slab of stone is set across the point where hot water flows into the bath. It is known today as the diving stone.

If you visit in the peak season, you will see costumed people around the Great Bath from 10am to 5pm and every afternoon between 1.30pm and 4.30pm in the winter months.

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balhannah
Jan 24, 2012

Roman Baths

The whole reason the city is there. The Romans discovered the advantages of the natural mineral hot springs and built a huge complex of Baths and temples. The baths and the city deteriorated but was rediscovered in the 18th Century. The Baths were and continue to be restored and researched. The building that houses it was rebuilt by the Georgians. The Georgian Pump Rooms overlooks the Sacred Spring bath and tea and luncheons are served there. There is a gift shop as well and the museum entry fee comes with a long device which is the audio tour. You punch in numbers that correspond to signs around the complex. It's very good and comes in many languages.

You can see the excavations under the Baths and there are a lot of interactive and informative signs in addition to the recorded guide. There is a diorama/scale model of what the whole complex might have looked like in Roman days as well.

The cost in 2011 prices is £12.00 and the combined ticket with the Fashion museum/Assembly rooms, about a mile away, is £15.50. It's a bit high, but is interesting if you like this kind of thing. I did enjoy the Fashion museum which is a cheaper entrance ticket on its own at £7.25.

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tvor
Aug 05, 2011

Aquae Sulis

The Roman Baths were built over unique hot springs of water. The Romans built a temple To Minerva and bathing complex that still flows with natural hot water. Look down at the green water, from which rises a pervasive smell. Statues are placed round the wall. Then go down below street level and visit the water's source . The extensive ruins and treasures from the spring are preserved and presented well, and information is explained in the audio-guide, which is available in several languages.

Costumed characters [e.g. a Roman soldier and a pilgrim or monk] mingle with visitors every day. As well as archaeological explanations, a children's audioguide and "Bryson at the Baths" audioguide tours are included in the admission price, and make the tour enjoyable..
A special day offer can be obtained which includes 2 hours in a spa and lunch in the Pump Room as well as entry to the Roman Baths , for £55.

Opening 1 Mar 2009 - 30 Jun 2009
Day Opening Times
Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
Opening 1 Jul 2009 - 31 Aug 2009
Day Opening Times
Monday 09:00 - 21:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 21:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 21:00
Thursday 09:00 - 21:00
Friday 09:00 - 21:00
Saturday 09:00 - 21:00
Sunday 09:00 - 21:00
Bank Holiday 09:00 - 21:00
Opening 1 Sep 2009 - 31 Oct 2009
Day Opening Times
Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
Opening 1 Nov 2009 - 31 Dec 2009
Day Opening Times
Monday 09:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
Friday 09:30 - 16:30
Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
Bank Holiday 09:30 - 16:30
Opening 1 Jan 2010 - 28 Feb 2010
Day Opening Times
Monday 09:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
Friday 09:30 - 16:30
Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
Tickets Information
Ticket Type Ticket Tariff*
Family (2 Adults + 4 Children) £32.00 per ticket
Adult from £11.00 to £11.50 per ticket
Concession £9.50 per ticket
Child £7.20 per ticket

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uglyscot
Jun 17, 2011
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pedersdottir

"A Visit to Jane Austen's Town"
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coceng

"Baaaaarth, Darling !"
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toonsarah

"An afternoon in Bath"
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jo104

"Home to Britain's only Hot Springs"
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Dabs

"Bath"
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The Pump Rooms, Bath

Built by Baldwin between 1790 to 1795. This neo-classical salon was once the social hub of Bath.

For over 2,000 years, the secret of the hot spring waters as a curative property has lured visitors to Bath.
Originally, bathing in the waters was the way to be gently restored to health, but in the late 17th century, drinking the waters instead, or as well as was the way to go!

The hot spring waters are drawn into the pump room, and the 43 minerals found in the water can be tasted today.

A pumper, wearing an authentically researched costume of 1795 (the year this pump room opened) will offer you a glass of this apparently 'unusual' tasting water.
I'm afraid I didn't get to try this experience (or am I?) I'd guess 'unusual' means yeuukkk!

The hot waters heat the Roman Baths, and provide heating for the Pump Rooms during winter.

Admission is free - our guided tour ended here, enabling a quick peep at the steaming Roman Bath through a window.

The Pump Room Restaurant is a popular place to eat, with 'old fashioned service' but contempory English cuisine, eaten whilst being serenaded by the Pump Room Trio, or a pianist.

There are also a few antiques on display, including a clock made by Thomas Tompin - presented to the rooms in 1709.

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suvanki
Apr 04, 2011

A Miracle Cure

Apparently the water has miracle abilities. We did drink some of the water from the spring that is suppose to cure illnesses. Nobody was sick so I don't know if it works. Some people said it tastes awful, but it just tastes like hot seawater.

Even if you don't want to queue to get a ticket or find it too expensive to do the entire tour, just peep in by restaurant and the shop to get an idea of what the baths look like.

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cleocat
Feb 01, 2011

Known as Aquae Sulis

The Roman Baths are worth visiting for the history and how Bath became an important city in the Roman times as well as the Georgian ones. The Baths are known as Aquae Sulis which were originally completed with temple and baths during the 1st and 5th centuries A.D and were revolved around a natural hot spring. On entry, visitors are given an audio guide which complements the main highlights of the Roman Baths. It took me around 2.5 hours to take in all the information and history and cost around 11-12GBP.

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spidermiss
Jul 11, 2010

Roman Baths

The Roman Bath’s are one of the largest tourist attractions in South West England and are Britain's only hot spring. The site includes the remains of the Temple of Aquae Sulis, the Roman baths fed by the sacred hot spring, and a well-presented museum of artifacts found at the site.

January – February: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

March – June: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

July – August: 9.00 am to 9.00 pm

September – October: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

November – December: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

email romanbaths_bookings@bathnes.gov.uk

February 2010

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grayfo
Mar 25, 2010

Things to Do Near Bath

Things to Do

Royal Crescent

30 Georgian style houses lay out The Royal Crescent. Designed by the John Wood the Younger, an architect, and built between 1767 and 1774. The listed exterior hardly has changed as it was when it was...
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Pulteney Bridge

Of the many nice shops on the Pulteney Bridge, the florists is clearly the most colourful. This is a lovely place to walk and take in the atmosphere of Bath whose history is defined by the water that...
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River Avon

If you have at least two days or more to explore the City of Bath and not in a hurry, You can go on an Avon River Boat Tour and or Cruise of which You can take the Narrow Boats in the downstream of...
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Queens Square

Designed by John Wood, the Elder, during the Georgian times in the 18th Century. Wood lived in one of the square's houses with its Palladian architecture. The square's obelisk was erected by Beau Nash...
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Circus

Bath was a kind of experiment: In the 18th century, Ralph Allen, a rich businessman, bought the sandstone quarries of Claverton and Combe Down near Bath. Together with John Wood sr., he fulfilled his...
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Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey may look like a cathedral, but it isn't. A cathedral is the principal church of a diocese, and for whatever reason Bath Abbey wasn't important enough to become that. Instead Wells' majestic...
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