Manama Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by globetrott
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by globetrott
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by globetrott

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Manama

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    The Shaikh Isa Bin Ali Mosque

    by globetrott Updated Dec 23, 2015

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    This is the Shaikh Isa Bin Ali Mosque in the old souk and you will find it next to Shaikh Isa Bin Ali House. The mosque is a very impressive building with 2 minarettes and a lot of interesting details in the facade that makes it worth to take a closer look at for the tourists, even though they are not allowed to see the mosque from inside.
    Take a walk around the building, the backside, facing the Shaikh Isa Bin Ali House is worth seeing as well - see it in my last picture !

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    • Architecture

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    The Four Seasons and United Towers

    by globetrott Written Dec 23, 2015

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    The Four Seasons and United Towers are sights that you will be able to recognize already from a far distance. Unfortunately I was not able to get any closer. These buildings had been constructed in 2014 as a combination of residential, commercial, retail, tourism and community facilities and public amenities, according to some infos that I found in the internet.

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    a Shaikh house in the Souk

    by globetrott Written Dec 22, 2015

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    This is another traditional Shaikh house that you will find in the souk of Al Muharraq and unfortunately I was not able to get inside, although the door was obviously open for visitors and the whole complex was also perfectely restored. Our time in the souk was restricted and there was another similar such building on our schedule anyway, the Shaikh Isa Bin Ali House.

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    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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    a medrese maybe

    by globetrott Updated Dec 22, 2015

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    This is the most interesting medrese or mosque in Al Muharraq in my personal opinion, because it is decorated with some unique tiles like I have never seen it for a mosque in any other part of the Middle East. This building is hidden in a sidestreet of the souk of Al Muharraq, it is not standing alone and it also does not have a minaret.
    So it might by a Medrese / Madrasa / Quran-school as well.

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    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

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    a mosque in the old souk

    by globetrott Updated Dec 22, 2015

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    This is one of the many mosques that you will find in the Souk of Muharraq, the north-east part of Manama. There was no way to take a look inside for a tourist and non-muslim like me, but it was great to see it at least from outside and take some pictures to take home as a souvenir.
    It is also no problem at all when you take pictures of buildings and street-scenes.

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    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    in the old Souk

    by globetrott Written Dec 22, 2015

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    Dont miss the old Souk of Al Muharraq, a part of Manama in the north-east of town. We came to the Souk of Al Muharraq on December 16th - that is the National Holiday of Bahrain - and where quite surprised that on such a holiday the shops would still be opened. Our tourguide told us that Al Muharraq is an old town that is inhabited mainly by not so wealthy people, the houses are quite simple and also the price-level in the Souk and the supermarkets there is much below the pricelevel in the modern cities like Manama.

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    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

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    decorated roundabouts

    by globetrott Updated Dec 22, 2015

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    Manama is a city that was built in a former desert after 1970, when oil-prices went up and so all of the city was planned with lots of spaces for streets, gardens and houses. And it was an interesting aspect when travelling through Bahrain and other countries in the Middle East that a lot of the roundabouts are decorated with some interesting monuments or constructions in the centre, so there was always something nice to see, when travelling overland.

    My favorite roundabout was the one with the Falcon !

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    • Photography
    • Road Trip

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    camel farm

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 2, 2012

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    Definitely not a visit I would recommend... near the Saudi bridge it is possible to stop and visit a large camel farm. There are over 600 camels there which belong to the Emir.. We asked what he would do with them, and the answer was simple: nothing. Camels are his passion so he herds them... and occasionally races them. The problem is that they are all individually ties with very little room to move. And if that were not enough, their front legs are ties together so that they can only allowed to take short steps. A very sad life...

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    first oil well and museum

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 2, 2012

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    Out in the middle of nowhere in the Southern Governorate, it is possible to see the first oil well found in the country - and the attached museum next door should give you all the relevant information, except for the fact that no one knows when it is open. What you can see, however, is a tiny building that back in 1932 when oil was first pumped, was used both as a recruitment office and the place where workers would collect their weekly wages.
    The visit was interesting and worth the roughly 30 minutes drive from the City center. Getting there was the most interesting part of the trip, however... through barren desert land rich in gas and oil... there is virtually an oil well next to a gas deposit. next to... (multiply this by the hundreds)...

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    Bahrain Fort

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 1, 2012

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    Qal'at al-Bahrain is better known as Bahrain Fort or Portuguese Fort and it is located outside Manama. It was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2005.
    The fort is huge with walls as high as 12 metres and dating back to 2300 BC. In fact, before the Portuguese gave it its actual shape (in the 14th century), older populations built on this site, including the Dilmun civilization.
    Just before you reach the fort you will see some ancient ruins of an old village; if you look closely you will see the little lanes and alleys.

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    bridge to saudi arabia

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 1, 2012

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    The King Fahd Causeway is the causeway-bridge which links Saudi Arabia to Bahrain. Half-way along it there is the official border point but just before there is a parking lot with a panoramic tower and a restaurant in there. We went at sunset and could catch a glimpse of Damman and al Khobar in the distance, which was very nice. However we had expected the panoramic tower and restaurant to be a fancy place for a pre-evening drink... well, the place was empty, self service and basically filthy! No wonder no one drank or ate there. So we just took our pictures and left...

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    Countryside of the North-West

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2011

    The north-west of the island is, by far, my favourite part of the whole of Bahrain. It's not just because of the small, picturesque villages, but because it is here that you see the best views of seaside life. This part of the country is prized by many, including expats, for the houses with lush gardens, and there is a very exclusive country club that has also gone up here. It is well worth a short drive if you have your own car while in Bahrain, especially if you're looking to get a few pictures of scenes you wouldn't think you'd see in the Gulf.

    Horse riding by Karranah More of the rif Boats by Karranah Corrugated sheet metal fences by the sea A boat on the beach at Budaiya

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    Al Ali Mosque

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2011

    Al A'li's main mosque is a bit of an anomaly, as it does not have a golden dome, nor does it have any of the tiling that seems to be fairly common for shi'ite mosques. It does have, however, a beautifully turquoise dome, as well the same colour of patterns on the minarets of the mosque. I didn't go into the mosque, and I'm not sure that this particular one is very historical, as there are other ones in the same town that have the typical gold dome.

    The main mosque of Al A'li A view of one of the minarets The mosque's fa��ade More of the mosque
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    Al A'li

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2011

    Al Ali is famous for one particular thing - pottery. One should expect that in a country with a long traditiion of mercantile ventures, and with a lot of dry, dusty areas, that pottery would flourish. Al Ali has some tombs and burial sites where visitors can see the various stages of pottery development, but it also has more than a few modern hucksters seeking to make good off of the town's tradition. Perhaps the most notible part of all of this is the large amphore in the centre of the town. This is also another one of the restive Shi'ite towns of the interior, so don't plan to come here to see the pottery if the country is in another wave of protests.

    The pottery monument Close-up of the monument A view of Al A'li's main drag A Shi'ite flag in the main roundabout A view of a smaller mosque
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    • Archeology

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    Dumistan

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2011

    Dumistan is another one of those restive towns that you are unlikely to visit - unless you go out looking for a restive town. It is located in the dusty interior of Bahrain and is lost amongst the poorer villages that cut off Manama from the more affluent area of Riffa. The town is heavily shiite and was the scene of some pretty violent protests in March. It is still until a police blockade today, but it is possible to get through to see the town. There's not much here, although you will find a mosque with the tell-tale gold down replicating the mosque in Samarra, Iraq. There is also a backroad here through Dumistan to the town of Karzakan, which has a far more impressive mosque. You may need to cut through the town to be able to get to Karzakan, depending on the security situation in the country.

    The mosque and its gold dome A closer view of the dome The mosque in Dumistan Another view of the mosque The back end of the mosque
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    • Architecture

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Manama Off The Beaten Path

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