Caesarea Things to Do

  • The Roman amphitheater, Caesarea
    The Roman amphitheater, Caesarea
    by iblatt
  • Preparing for concert, Roman amphitheater,Caesarea
    Preparing for concert, Roman...
    by iblatt
  • View from balcony, Roman amphitheater, Caesarea
    View from balcony, Roman amphitheater,...
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Most Recent Things to Do in Caesarea

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    Diving in Caesarea

    by Nathalie_B Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We all know that the Dutch are the world’s champions in drying seas, but was it their invention? Definitely not! When Herod was building his city he wanted everything to be luxurious, and so had to be the harbor. For this purpose he had to start building in the water. Even then the Roman technique of hydraulic concrete already existed and huge blocks of concrete were dumped in the sea to create steady platform for the biggest harbor of the Mediterranean cost.
    The remains of this ahead-of-its-times construction can be seen if you chose to go on a diving tour. You don’t have to be a certified diver, so anyone can do it. You will be accompanied by an experienced instructor who will also show you the ancient ruins of Herod’s harbor. You will be given a map with points of interest so you won’t miss a thing. The diving session takes about 30 minutes, but it is long enough, especially for the inexperienced ones among us.
    Their English site is still under construction, so better e-mail them and call.

    Address: Old Caesarea, behind the "Masada" restaurant

    Phone: 972 - (0)4 - 6265898

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Historical Travel

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    The beautiful "Bird Mosaic" floor

    by MariusG Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the beautiful "Bird Mosaic" floor; its size is 14.5m x 16m and it is located on a hilltop, some 500 m outside the city wall of Byzantine Caesarea. The "Bird Mosaic" is believed to be the remains of a villa from the Byzantine period (the second half of the 6th century-first half of the 7th century CE). From the plan of the parts that were exposed in the excavations, it is estimated that the villa complex covers an area some 3,000 square m. It is also believed that the complex was destroyed in a raid that occurred prior to the Muslim siege of Caesar in 640 CE..
    The site is now open to the public and entrance to it is free.
    In Caesarea there is also a large archaeological site, with remains from Roman, Byzantine and Crusader periods.

    Address: some 200 m after Caesarea entrance gate

    Directions: Enter Caesarea from Haifa Tel-Aviv highway #2 or from Or-Akiva stoplight on highway #4 and drive North. After some 200m after the entrance gate park the car on the left site of the road and climb the paved path to the top of the hill to the mosaic site.

    People visiting Caesarea on the mosaic floor a picture of a deer on the mosaic floor a picture of a bird on the mosaic floor a picture of a bird on the mosaic floor
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    • Archeology
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    The Aqueduct

    by gubbi1 Written Jan 30, 2011

    At the beach north of the Caesarea National Park you will find the remains of the Aqueduct bringing water to the city. This was necessary as there were no other sources available here. So water had to be transported over kilometers from far away into town.
    If you have time you can bring your beach stuff with you and stay here for some time.

    Directions: Follow the signs from the National Park to the Aqueduct. It is basically about 2-3 km north of the NP directly at the beach. Use the car!

    Aqueduct, Caesarea, IL Aqueduct, Caesarea, IL Aqueduct, Caesarea, IL
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    Harbour

    by gubbi1 Updated Jan 30, 2011

    The harbour had a 400 meter long outer quay, an inner quay and an area where the boats could set the anchor. It was built during the rule of Herod and made Caesarea an important town. Nowadays not much is seen above the surface, but for divers it is possible to visit the remains hidden under water.
    There is a diving center. If interested try the phone number of the National Park given on the Ceasarea NP page linked below.

    Directions: In Caesarea NP, Item number 8

    Website: http://www.parks.org.il/BuildaGate5/general2/data_card.php?Cat=~25~~858800043~Card12~&ru=&SiteName=parks&Clt=&Bur=404884502

    Harbour, Caesarea NP, IL Harbour, Caesarea NP, IL Harbour, Caesarea NP, IL
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    • National/State Park
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    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Temple Platform

    by gubbi1 Written Jan 30, 2011

    There are ruins of a temple platform from Herods time on which a temple dedicated to Roma and Augustus was built. In later periodes other religious buildings were erected here, a mosque and a cathedral.

    Directions: In Caesarea NP, Item number 9

    Temple Platform, Caesarea NP, IL Temple Platform, Caesarea NP, IL
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    Pontius Pilatus

    by gubbi1 Written Jan 30, 2011

    Close to the Promontory Palace you will find a lime stone block set up which carries an inscription telling the name of Pontius Pilatus, the man who send Jesus to the crucifixion. According to a documentory (and stated on wikipedia) this is the first physical evidence found of him beside what is written in the bible. It was found in the theater in 1961. Keep your eyes open, the stone is easily missed. It is a copy, the original one is in the Israel Museum (Jerusalem).

    Directions: Caesarea NP, at the Promotory Palace

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontius_Pilate

    Pontius Pilatus, Caesarea NP, IL
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    Promontory Palace

    by gubbi1 Updated Jan 30, 2011

    The Promontory Palace is located directly at the sea in the west of the theater. It originates from the Roman and Byzantine Periode. You can see a pool in the remains which, according to scientists, was used as the cities fish market for a while.

    Directions: In Caesarea NP, Item number 2

    Promontory Palace, Caesarea NP, IL Promontory Palace, Caesarea NP, IL Promontory Palace, Caesarea NP, IL
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    Herodian Amphitheater

    by gubbi1 Updated Jan 30, 2011

    The Amphitheater is a huge and long structure between the harbour and the theater. A long row of seats can be seen along the impressive arena floor which extends over 250 meters in length and 50 meters in width. About 10.000 people could attend events here. Walking along there you can clearly imagine spectacles taking place.

    Directions: In Caesarea NP, Item number 3

    Herodian Amphitheater, Caesarea NP, IL Herodian Amphitheater, Caesarea NP, IL Herodian Amphitheater, Caesarea NP, IL Herodian Amphitheater, Caesarea NP, IL
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    The Theater

    by gubbi1 Written Jan 30, 2011

    The theater in Caesarea is in a very good shape, as the seats seem to be restored. It is pretty large and the most ancient in Israel. 4000 spectators could find place in it. According to the flyer, which is handed out at the entrance, the theater was converted into a castle towards the end of the Byzantine periode. After the Arab conquer it was deserted as the rest of the town.

    Directions: In Caesarea NP, Item number 1

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesarea_Maritima

    The Theater, Caesarea NP, IL The Theater, Caesarea NP, IL
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    Herod's Amphitheater

    by iblatt Updated Aug 17, 2010

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    Caesarea's ancient amphitheater is an impressive semi-circular structure built by King Herod.
    Its location is superb, near the coast, with a view of the Mediterranean from the balconies.
    The ampitheater was reconstructed so that it is fully functional now. It's a unique experience to sit on the 2000 year old stone balcony, see the extensive ruins of the Roman city below you, watch the sunset over the Mediterranean, and listen to a concert or watch an opera.

    Address: In the Caesarea National Park.

    Directions: South of the Roman hippodrome, near the coast. Lots of parking nearby.

    Phone: 04-6361010 Cesarea National Park

    The Roman amphitheater, Caesarea Preparing for concert, Roman amphitheater,Caesarea View from balcony, Roman amphitheater, Caesarea
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    The Baths

    by iblatt Updated Aug 17, 2010

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    You can get an idea of the splendor and elegance of ancient Caesarea when you visit the baths. This public building was constructed in the Byzantine period, with mosaics, marble floors and marble pillars. Before and after the bath, bathers used to exercise in the paleastra; in the baths, different pools had different water temperatures: a real spa.

    Directions: In the Caesarea National Park, above the hippodrome.

    Phone: 04-6361010 Cesarea National Park

    Entrance to the baths, Caesarea Byzantine baths, Caesarea Mosaic floor in the baths of Caesarea Mosaic floor in the baths of Caesarea Byzantine baths, Caesarea
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    The Hippodrome

    by iblatt Updated Aug 17, 2010

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    More than 250 meters in length, the U-shaped hippodrome is one of the most impressive remains of Roman Caesarea.
    It was built in Herod's days, and could seat 10,000 spectators, who came to watch the horse and chariot races, gladiator fights, athletics, hunting games and other forms of entertainment.
    It used to be called "amphitheater" in Herod's days, and referred to as "stadium" by Josephus, but is now generally known as the hippodrome.

    You can see the starting gates ("carceres") at the northern end, from which the chariots actually started the race, and parts of the balcony are also well preserved.
    You can also have your photo taken on a symbolic iron chariot (see photo), and pretend you are a Roman chariot driver!

    Directions: In the Caesarea National Park.

    Phone: 04-6361010 Cesarea National Park

    David and Sandy Southern end of the hippodrome, Caesarea The hippodrome, Caesarea Plan of the hippodrome, Caesarea
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    • Archeology

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    The Roman Palace Ruins

    by iblatt Updated Aug 17, 2010

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    Near the Southern end of the Roman city, on a small promontory jutting into the sea, there are the ruins of the upper and lower palace. Not much has remained of the upper palace: a few marble and mosaic floors, the bases of a few columns, some steps... Still less has survived in the lower palace, of which you can only see the general layout half covered by the sea water. A few reconstructed pillars help you imagine what it used to be like in Herod's days. With a little bit of imagination you can imagine the splendor of this edifice in ancient times.

    The upper palace was the public part of the palace, and the lower palace was the private part.
    It is still unclear who built this palace in the Roman period: King Herod, the great builder of Caesarea, or the Roman governor, when the city became the province capital. Whoever it was, he surely picked a great location, and the beauty of this spot can still be appreciated today.

    Directions: In the Caesarea National Park.

    Phone: 04-6361010 Cesarea National Park

    General view of the palace Ruins of the lower palace The palace in Caesarea The palace, Caesarea
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    The Roman Aqueduct

    by iblatt Written Jun 23, 2010

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    Bringing water to the Roman and Byzantine city of Caesarea was not easy. The nearest water source was the springs of Shuni, some 7.5 km away. A massive, high aqueduct was constructed, and has survived in good condition for 2000 years. Long segments of the aqueduct were built on stone arches. One segment, crossing a low ridge of hills , was hewn out of the rock. The average slope of the aqueduct was only 0.2/1000. This was a remarkable engireering feat.

    Today the aqueduct can be seen north of the main archeological site, in an open area on the beach. The way is well signposted.
    As it lies outside the National Park, it is always open and accessible and free.

    There is a swimming beach right near the aqueduct. Families also come here for picnics. It's an interesting mixture of Roman ruins and a vibrant modern beach, with children in swimsuits climbing the 2000-year-old aqueduct.
    Sunsets here can be very romantic!

    Directions: On the beach, north of the Caesarea National Park.

    The aqueduct in Caesarea The aqueduct in Caesarea The Caesarea Aqueduct Beach
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Caesarea National Park

    by Vabate Written Nov 23, 2009

    Great day trip. Acts 21-27 Where Paul, a Roman Citizen and a Jew, stood accused by the Jews, before Festus and King Agrippa then appealed to Augustus Caesar and set sail for Rome. Don't miss the judgement hall where Paul once stood!
    King Herod the Great transformed the city beginning in 22 BCE with the construction of his palace, amphitheater, hippodrome, port, warehouses, markets, public buildings, bathhouses, and temples, naming it Caesarea. Every five years the city hosted gladiatorial games, sports competitions and performances.
    From Jerusalem Central Bus Station Bus Number 947 for 66NIS return trip - get off at Or Akiva Interchange and Coastal Highway 2 . Walk back to cross through the tunnel under the highway. Return trip - the bus stop is on the highway to Tel Aviv.
    April–September 8 A.M.–6 P.M. October–March 8 A.M– 4 P.M. On Fridays the site closes one hour earlier than above. Adult entrance ticket 36NIS.
    October 2009 1USD = 3.7NIS

    Address: From Jerusalem Central Bus Station Bus Number 947

    Directions: Caesarea Port City on the Mediterranean Coast, national park, beach, diving and restaurants.

    Website: http://www.parks.co.il

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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Caesarea Things to Do

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