More Safety Tips in Jordan

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Lunch troubles

    by solopes Updated Apr 17, 2016

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    Traveling in Jordan it's easy, but lunchtime may depend on the journey, so be prepared to start eating from one to six in the afternoon, as we did in our visit to Wadi Rum.

    Furthermore, road restaurants are scarce and not easy to find in most places, and being out, one precaution is absolute: WATER, but if you are in an organized tour, the guide will be aware of it and will help you.

    Wadi Rum Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan
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    Driving

    by leics Updated Jan 5, 2015

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    I didn't drive in Jordan but during my week there, I did a lot of travelling and a lot of observing. These points may be helpful:

    1. Make absolutely sure that you carry ID with you at all times. It is a legal requirement.

    2. Traffic in Amman is very heavy indeed. Expect delays at any time of day. Traffic in other large settlements can and does get backed-up at busy times.

    3. Double and even triple-parking is commonplace throughout the country. Using your horn extensively is also normal.

    4. Major roads, such as the Desert Highway are well-maintained and driveable at speed (and people do drive at speed, in lorries and buses as well as cars). Smaller roads may be bumpy and potholed, with sand and gravel making surfaces treacherous.

    5. Speed bumps are common, particularly at the beginning and end of villages. They are not always well signed and their painted markings have often faded.

    6. Always be aware of animals. Sheep, goats and dogs (though very few of the latter...I saw less than 10 during my week's tour) roam freely as do camels, including alongside the fast Desert Highway. Camels are very heavy and very expensive beasts so hitting one is going to be very expensive as well as doing a great deal of damage to you and your vehicle.

    7. Also be very aware of pedestrians and especially children. Even quite small children play unsupervised on the streets.

    8. Roadside stalls selling vegetables and, on the Desert Highway, fuel smuggled from Saudi Arabia, are common. Expect other drivers to suddenly pull in when something catches their eye.

    9. There are numerous small tea, coffee & snack places dotted along every major road but there are also long expanses of nothingness (for example, on the road up to Mount Nebo) where breaking down or running out of fuel would not be fun.

    10. There are Customs checkpoints on main roads leading into and out of the Aqaba duty-free zone. Expect to be stopped and checked unless you are on a tourist bus.

    11. Police checkpoints are fairly common on major roads. Again, expect to be stopped and checked unless you are on a tourist bus.

    12. It can and does rain in Jordan. Heavy rain can create huge puddles and slippery roads, very heavy rain can cause flash floods. It can also snow, especially in the northern part of the country. Heavy snowfall, when it occurs (as in 2013) can and does completely close roads.

    Crossing the Desert Highway Donkey taking itself home Smuggled fuel Tea stops Up to Mount Nebo
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Long travel to the castles of the desert

    by solopes Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    The full day trip "Castles of the desert" it's an easy trip (if you travel with conditioned air, as you surely do) but not particularly interesting.

    You may count on long hours crossing an ugly desert, to see some buildings that are only a little bit more than inexpressive ruins. The exception is Qasr Amrah, a really beautiful building from the 8th century that was not exactly a castle, but a public bath.

    The paintings in the walls and roofs are magnificent, and well preserved.
    Being only 40 km from Amman, you may consider an exclusive visit, saving you time and kilometres.

    Qsar Amrah - Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan
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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Road Safety

    by antistar Updated Mar 6, 2014

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    This is a real danger in Jordan. They are pretty crazy drivers. I saw at least one crashed car on the roads nearly every day. Some of the scariest things on the roads are the overladen trucks, many with barely anything, and sometimes nothing, tying down the goods on the back. This is worrying enough when the goods are just fruit, but when they are great slabs of sandstone rock, this is really disconcerting.

    Rock lorry, Iraq Highway, Jordan

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    Health

    by antistar Updated Mar 6, 2014

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    The water is apparently safe to drink, but probably not worth risking it. I've heard that while safe most of the time, it occasionally gets some nasty bug in the system and there's usually no prior warning. Sensitive stomachs might want to be careful of eating street food. I caught a brief case of the runs after a falafel in Kerak. Generally the food is so well cooked as to not be a problem, but the salad can always be a risk.

    There's no malaria in Jordan, and you are only advised to get the same immunisation boosters you'd expect to have for living at home.

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    Dress code

    by Ronza Written Jun 30, 2011

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    I don't know if this applicable in all regions and I also don't know if this is applicable to non Arabic ladies too (I have the Middle Eastern look). But when we visited Aqaba city center my outfit wasn’t very suitable for the locals and we had to leave very early coz this was really annoying (everybody looking at me). I was wearing a Bermuda short.

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    SUNBLOCK

    by Ronza Written Jun 30, 2011

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    Do NOT forget your sunscreen and do NOT miss any uncovered spot. The sun might burn you in minutes and you definitely know how painful that could be. If you don’t know, send me an e-mail and I will describe it for you

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  • jordan is a ripoff

    by leodrole Written Feb 1, 2010

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    The price for admission at Petra is through the roof and going up again. the two of us went for the weekend from israel via eilat to renew our visa and to see petra. although jordan is relaxed and hospitable, it is very expensive. on fridays, no buses, so you must hire private taxi. then, petra admission has cancelled student prices and made guide fees mandatory. for two, that meant it came to 64 dinars, or 80 dollars. we said sorry, we could simply not afford it. and the price is going up to 60 dinars per person at the end of the summer. This is not a cheap country for backpackers anymore. ridiculous to charge for services we dont want and ostensibly to provide services that arent there. insult to injury, the allenby/king hussein border from amman to jerusalem closes at noon on weekends, and you have to pay a taxi 40 dinars to take you way up north to the sheikh hussein/bet shemesh crossing, leaving you stranded in the middle of nowhere israel. and if you dont spend enough time in jordan, they fine you with a high exit tax. we arent going back. avoid jordan. spend your money in egypt and syria.

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    • Archeology

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  • kucha's Profile Photo

    Mud-Men of the Dead Sea

    by kucha Written Nov 19, 2009

    Careful at the Dead Sea!! Mud-men will approach you and ask to spread warm Dead Sea mud all over your body in exchange for a small tip. If you fall for this, make sure no "friends" with cameras are nearby!

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  • vinc_bilb's Profile Photo

    Smoking everywhere

    by vinc_bilb Updated Jul 15, 2009

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    Jordan law regarding smoking in the public areas does not exist or is not applied. People are smoking, a lot, and everywhere. If you are allergic or sensitive to the smoke, this could be a nightmare or a bad experience

    Even in the holds of the bus during a break

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Safety

    by PierreZA Written May 23, 2009

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    I never felt unsafe in Jordan.

    The streets of Downtown Amman are very crowded and busy, but I never had any problems. The people of Jordan are very friendly and helpful.

    If you go to the Dead Sea, Mt Nebo and the Baptism Site, carry your passport with you as there are a few check-points (there are some areas which are military zones).

    Street Market, Amman

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  • Aqaba: no warnings needed

    by whiskeycreekwilly Written Dec 22, 2008

    None! Not only does the city of Aqaba feel incredibly safe, but theft is just not an issue. We went diving & left out wallets, keys, passports, etc. on the seat in the van which was unlocked with the doors open. Where else can you do that? As usual expect taxi drivers to try to overcharge you.

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  • vinc_bilb's Profile Photo

    Waste everywhere

    by vinc_bilb Updated Nov 10, 2008

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    The collection and the waste treatment seems to be unknown in Jordan. It's not a judgement, is a fact: full of empty bottles, old tyres and plastic bags and other human wastes. This affects most of the country, cities, beaches and desert included.

    My suggestion: for this topic only, don't act as the locals

    The other side of Wadirum Public beach, red sea
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  • vinc_bilb's Profile Photo

    Water: the critical resource

    by vinc_bilb Written Nov 10, 2008

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    The water is a vital and critical resource, so, saving it is a hughe constraint, with consequences for the not warned tourist daily life:

    - No cork in bathtubs
    - the toilet paper is not supposed to be put itself into toilet but into a dedicated basket, in order to minimize the usage of the water.
    - A small shower head is often an alternative to the flush system

    Playing with water is not recommended
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  • vinc_bilb's Profile Photo

    Repect the king and the royal family.

    by vinc_bilb Written Nov 10, 2008

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    The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a constitutional monarchy . The monarch is the head of state. Behind this official statement, a lack of respect regarding the King or the royal family is considered as a rude insult and disrespectful.

    The attachment of the Jordanians to the King is real and does not limit itself to the omnipresent official portraits. Photos from King Abdullah II or from his father King Hussein are everywhere in private arrays (shops, houses,...).
    It's a common sense but, whatether is your political sensibility, Jordan is a kingdom and the respect to the king is the default rule to be applied here

    The Kings
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    • Desert

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