Fort Payne Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
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Best Rated Things to Do in Fort Payne

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    Little River FAlls

    by BruceDunning Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    The Little River Falls canyon is a very nice and secluded place to stop and enjoy nature. It runs on the top of Lookout Mountain range and starts from NW Georgia, and ends in Weiss Lake. It has few areas to hike/walk around, and basically has 9 places to pull the vehicle off the road and get views of the river/falls. The canyon is 17 miles long and the depth is average 400 feet to the river base , but 700 at deepest point. The drive is 22 miles long, and follows the west rim of the canyon.
    It is located on Hwy 35, and 12 miles east from Ft. Payne. They have some hiking trails that are mostly unmarked and along the river edge, or on the peak of the rock ledge

    Raging water running down the rock ledge Wonderful green and clear water falls. Little River heading south
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    Mentone

    by BruceDunning Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    This is a 4 way stop north of Ft. Payne about 12 miles. It has two B&B places to stay and a couple of antique stores. Besides that, this used to be a spa area for retreats. It has seen a more popular day in the past. The old buildings are nice to view, though. They appear to be around early 1930-40's

    Front view of Mentone Inn B&B at square Mentone Inn on side street
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    Desoto State Park

    by BruceDunning Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    This is a really nice park for campers and hiking. It is located on County Rd 89 and about 10 miles NE of Ft. Payne. The park has rustic cabins, lofts, and motel rooms, as well as camper spots. The total 26 cabins and 25 rooms, and 93 campers sites. The prices are very reasonable. Inside the motel lobby is a restaurant that serves good food.
    The park has 27 miles of roads, and many hiking trails to follow. It is mostly all wooded, but has a small lake, also.

    Main entry to the park lodge Motel rooms by the lodge REstaurant in lodge.
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    Little River Falls Sites

    by BruceDunning Written Jan 21, 2010

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    There are 9 places where you can pull off the road and have an overview of the canyon and river beauty. The route takes you down Hay 176 through the park for 12 miles and you can come out the back end to re-circuit back to Ft. Payne; about 10 miles further. The views are spectacular, and gives impression that this is pure wilderness.

    Grace FAlls drop of about 600 feet. View of the river meandering through the canyon Umbrella Rock in the road Balancing umbrella rock Mushroom Rock formations along roadside
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    Indian Falls in DeSoto State Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 4, 2014

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    Sunday, March 2nd, Tony and I went to DeSoto State Park, we hiked out to Indian Falls..it is not a really big fall. It is located across the street from the parking lot for the Azalea Cascade and the boardwalk trail. This fall is located not to far away from the parking lot. Water Source
    Location
    About 7 miles from Fort Payne on County road 89 off Alabama Highway 35, just past the entrance to De Soto State Park
    Size 20 foot drop
    Trail Short trail, about 100 feet, across the road from a small parking area with a sign for Indian Falls
    Other Information
    I came upon this waterfall by chance while looking for DeSoto Falls. There was a sign at a small parking lot just across the road from the trail to the falls. The trail went to the right of a small water treatment facility.
    There is a footbridge across the creek just above the falls. From the far side of the bridge is a trail to the foot of the falls.

    This waterfall, although smaller than the others I saw that day, was especially appealing because of its seclusion. It was back into the woods, and there were no other people there.

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    Lodge Falls in DeSoto State Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 4, 2014

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    Sunday, March 2nd, Tony and I went hiking in DeSoto State Park. This was the fourth falls that we visited that day. It was the smallest of the four we saw. Very easy to get to. Lodge Falls
    This easy to find waterfall is located just behind DeSoto’s Lodge. Lodge Falls drops about 25 feet and is very rainfall dependant. The best view point of this waterfall is reached by hiking down into a small ravine and then getting on the yellow trail for a short distance and coming back out next to the Lodge.

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    Little River Canyon Falls

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 4, 2014

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    Sunday, March 2nd, Tony and I visited the Fort Payne area and visited the Little River Canyon National Preserve. Here we saw the Little Canyon Waterfalls, and we also traveled around the Rim of the Canyon for some really spectacular views of the canyon and the Little River below.
    It is beautiful@@ and it is FREE so you should definitely visit. There are picnic tables at various overlooks to enjoy.
    I highly recommend this gorgeous drive and its only a few hours outside of Nashville. An easy day trip...

    Little River Canyon National Preserve is a United States National Preserve located on top of Lookout Mountain near Fort Payne, Alabama, and DeSoto State Park. Created by an act of Congress in 1992, the nearly 14,000-acre (5,700 ha) preserve protects what is sometimes said to be the nation's longest mountaintop river, the Little River. The canyon was historically called "May's Gulf", "gulf" being a common term throughout the Cumberland Plateau for this sort of feature (e.g. Savage Gulf in Tennessee, or Trenton Gulf nearby in Georgia, now renamed "Cloudland Canyon"). The canyon is sometimes said to be the deepest canyon in the United States east of the Mississippi River. Prior to being assigned to the National Park Service, the canyon area formed the southmost unit of Alabama's DeSoto State Park.

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    Statues of the Band Alabama

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014

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    Tony and I was in Fort Payne on Sunday, March 2nd. We were driving down main street and found this Memorial Statues to the Band Alabama, apparently the boys were from this area. These are life size statues. Very interesting memorial and FREE to enjoy..Located on a corner with a parking lot near the City Park.

    Life-size statues of the country music group "Alabama" are now on display in this small town in the northeast of the state. The statues are in the corner of Union Park facing the intersection of Gault Avenue and 4th Street North in downtown Fort Payne

    Address: Gault Ave and 4th Street

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    Trail of Tear Sites

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014

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    In the 19th century, the site of Fort Payne was the location of Willstown, an important village of the Cherokees who relocated to Tahlequah, Oklahoma during the Cherokee Trail of Tears. For a time it was the home of Sequoyah, who invented the Cherokee syllabary, enabling reading and writing in the language. The settlement was commonly called Willstown, after its headman, a red-headed mixed-race man named Will. According to Major John Norton, a more accurate transliteration would have been Titsohili. The son of a Cherokee adoptee of the Mohawk, Norton grew up among Native Americans and traveled extensively throughout the region in the early 19th century. He stayed at Willstown several times,[1]
    During the 1830s prior to Indian removal, the US Army under command of Major John Payne built a fort here that was used to intern Cherokees until relocation to Oklahoma. Their forced exile became known as the Trail of Tears.

    Andrew Ross Home Fort Payne Cabin Williston Mission Cemetery
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    Hawk Glide Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 6, 2014

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    Today, Sunday March 2nd, Tony and I decided to drive down the Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive and found various overlooks that had the most magnificent views..They were so amazing. This particular overlook had the name "HAWK GLIDE"...now I did notice at several overlooks hawks gliding above us and sometimes at eye level. I really found this trip amazing.

    Hawks Glide - This overlook is noteworthy because visitors can often see hawks and other birds gliding over the canyon in the vicinity. For most visitors, the best way to explore Alabama's spectacular Little River Canyon National Preserve is by the paved scenic road that leads along the western rim of the canyon.

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  • jmpncsu's Profile Photo

    Little River Canyon

    by jmpncsu Written May 11, 2016

    Little River Canyon Preserve is a national preserve that protects it's namesake river as it flows down from Lookout Mountain. Little River flows around 23 miles through the canyon, carving one of the deepest gorges in the eastern US. The Little River Canyon Rim Parkway (AL-176) runs along the western rim and provides great views of the canyon. We entered the canyon near Eberhart Point and drove north, stopping at several scenic overlooks. The first was Grace's High Falls. Although this waterfall is seasonal and dries up in the summer, it is the highest in Alabama at 133 feet. We also stopped at Wolf Creek Overlook, Canyon View, and Lynn Overlook for great views of the canyon. At the beginning of the canyon is Little River Falls, a 45-foot river-wide waterfall. There's an overlook in the canyon with distant views of the waterfall or continue to AL-35, where you can walk down to an overlook right next to the falls. There are a couple short, but very steep trails that lead into the gorge, but we didn't have time to explore any more. But we had a really nice time driving through the canyon and enjoying the spectacular views.

    Address: 4322 Little River Trail NE Ste 100, Fort Payne, AL

    Phone: (256) 845-9605 x201

    Website: https://www.nps.gov/liri/index.htm

    Little River Falls Turkey Vulture at Grace's High Falls Little River Falls View from Wolf Creek Overlook View from Lynn Overlook
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    DeSoto State Park

    by jmpncsu Written May 16, 2016

    After visiting DeSoto Falls, we had some extra time and decided to visit the state park. DeSoto Falls is part of the state park, but located about 7 miles north of the main part. There are some great hiking trails and six smaller waterfalls to see in the park and we had a really nice time exploring around. We parked at the Talmadge Butler Boardwalk trailhead, with easy access to several of the waterfalls. The boardwalk leads about a quarter-mile to Azalea Cascade, a small slide on Laurel Creek. From here, we made a loop on the blue and orange blazed trails to see Lost Falls and Laurel Falls. These two waterfalls, both upstream from Azalea Cascade, are about 6 feet high and very pretty for their small size. After finishing up the loop, we walked across the street and behind the maintenance facility to see Indian Falls, a nice 20-foot waterfall with a footbridge going over the top. Then we hiked towards the lodge to see Lodge Falls, which is on a tributary just below the park lodge. We then headed back to the car and drove to Gilliam Loop Trailhead to access the DeSoto Scout Trail. Poison Ivy Falls is between DST Exit 1 and Exit 2 along DST. This is a really high waterfall falling off a cliff with a rockhouse behind. We only hiked a short section of DST, but it was a really beautiful hike along West Fork Little River and if we had more time, we would have liked to hike further. Overall, we had a really nice time at the park and would recommend checking it out if you are visiting the more well-known DeSoto Falls. Do note that all these waterfalls are seasonal and located on low-flow streams, so they're best to visit after a heavy rain.

    Address: 7104 DeSoto Parkway NE Fort Payne, AL 35967

    Phone: 256-845-5380

    Website: http://www.alapark.com/desoto-state-park

    Indian Falls Lost Falls Poison Ivy Falls Laurel Falls Lodge Falls
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    Canyon Rim Drve: Eberhart Point-Little River Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Updated Jun 20, 2009

    From Fort Payne, we headed south and hooked onto Route 176, which heads into the middle of the drive and heads back north. The first site you can see is Eberhart Point, which is a very short hike to an overlook of the canyon. Once you head back north, the next big site is Graces High Falls, which you can see in the distance from the overlook. Heading north again, there are a number of nice overlooks of the canyon, but few opportunities to get close. The one spot on the map is the Lower Two Mile trail, which was extremely steep, and not well marked. We made it part way down, but it wasn't appropriate for the kids, so we turned around part way down. Later we found out it is mainly a canoe launch, and not much of a view there either. You finish off heading past a rock that looks like a mushroom (Mushroom rock) and a complete mess of a turnoff (watch so you don't break an axle) at Lynn Overlook. The last overlook is to see Little River Falls from a distance, but as my next tip shows, you can get up close and personal there.

    Overall, the overlooks are mostly distant, so while the drive is pleasant enough, the scenery at the overlooks isn't worth more than a quick stop.

    Eberhart Point Graces High Falls Wolf Creek Hawks Glide Little River Falls Overlook

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    Little River Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Jun 20, 2009

    Specifically called out in the NPS brochure, this 45 foot high waterfall is fairly impressive and strong. There is a good sized parking lot just off the road here, as well as restrooms. A short hike down from the parking lot leads you to the falls, and a little scrambling over rocks can get you up close and personal with the Little River. Well worth the few minutes that it will take you off the beaten path - and truly the best site in the park.

    Little River Falls

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    fort payne depot museum

    by doug48 Written Sep 16, 2009

    the fort payne depot was built in 1891 and is listed on the national register of historic places. today the depot is home to the fort payne history museum. the museum has an interesting collection of native american artifacts and displays on the history of fort payne.

    Address: 105 5 th ave. s.w.

    Directions: downtown.

    Phone: 256-845-5714

    Website: http://www.fortpaynedepotmuseum.com/

    fort paune history museum
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