Downtown, Los Angeles

46 Reviews

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain

    by Yaqui Written Jan 22, 2010

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    This plaza is beautiful. A true gem within the confines of a concrete jungle.

    The plaque reads: The fountain was constructed in memory of Arthur J. Will, chief administrative officer, County of Los Angeles, 1951-1957, whose vision and leadership for more than 25 years of service to this community helped provide this great civic center as a symbol of good government and an inspiration for cultural growth.

    Located just north of the Los Angeles County Courts house off of Grand and W. 1st Street, Los Angeles, Ca 90012.

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    Joseph Scott Statue

    by Yaqui Written Jan 22, 2010

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    What is so unique about the downtown area are all these hidden little oasis. The huge Sycamore Fig trees (Ficus sycomorus) blend them into the back ground. So walking along the sidewalk is a better way to discover the hidden plaza's.

    The plaque reads: Joseph Scott. Mr. Los Angeles, 1867-1958. Beloved citizen, distinguished lawyer, civic leader. Practiced law in Los Angeles from 1894-1958. Established Knights of Columbus in California, 1902. Served as president of the Chamber of Commerce Board of Education, Community Chest, Boys' Week and Draft Board. Stalwart champion of americanism and militant foe of communism. Lifelong crusader for recognition of the Irish Republic. Nominated Herbert Hoover for president of the United States. Recognized by church and state with highest honors many times.

    Located with a small plaza hidden by the huge trees on the north side of Los Angeles County Courthouse on Grand Avenue and W. 1st Street. Los Angeles Ca 90012%c

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    Egyptian Lantrin

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2010

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    While exploring along the street you'll see some beautiful pieces of artwork everywhere including this lovely bronze lantrin. There are three other lantrins. It has some wonderful Egyptian images on it.

    Located on Grand Street near the Los Angeles Superior Stanley Mosk Courthouse on Grand Street and W. 1st Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

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    Abraham Lincoln Sculpture

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2010

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    Sculpted by Robert Merrell Gage and given to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. Underneath the sculpture is a smaller plaque that reads: This statue was given to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn by sculptor Robert Merrell Gage and was placed at this location by order of the Board of Supervisors on September 13, 1988. The unveiling was held on April 24, 1989.

    On the side of the sculpture is two plaques each reads: The Gettysburg Address ~ Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate…we cannot consecrate…we cannot hallow…this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us…that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

    Emancipation Proclamation

    Whereas on the 22nd day of September, A.D. 1862, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: "That on the 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

    "That the executive will on the 1st day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State or the people thereof shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such States shall have participated shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State and the people thereof are not then in rebellion against the United States."

    Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-In-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days from the first day above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States the following, to wit:

    Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terrebone, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northhampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are for the present left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

    And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

    And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all case when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.

    And I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

    And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

    Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.

    By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN

    Located at that corner of the Los Angeles Superior Stanley Mosk Courthouse Building on Grand Street and W.1st Street, Los Angeles Ca 90012

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    Parker Center - Los Angeles Police Department

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    The beautiful building replaced the orginal buildilng that was built in 1954. It was decided to rebuild since it would cost too much to seismic retrofit the old one. It was named after the Chief William H. Parker and reopened Oct of 2009.

    Located 100 W. 1st Street Los Angeles, CA 90012, just south of Los Angeles City Hall.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071
    800-366-6116

    Phone: 877-ASK-LAPD

    Website: http://www.lapdonline.org/

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    Caltrans Building

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    This is the California Department of Transportation district 7 Headquarters which stands out. The huge number 100 is the adress for the buidings. A very unique futuristic archetiture.

    Located on W. 1st Street and N. Main Street.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Phone: 800-366-6116

    Website: http://discoverlosangeles.com/

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    Frank Putnam Flint Fountain

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 17, 2010

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    This plaque reads: The fountain is dedicated to and commemorates the public service of Frank Putnam Flint, United States Senator, 1905-1911. "While representing California in the US Senate in 1906, Senator Flint led the campaign to permit construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct on federal land. The US Senate readily approved his legislative proposal. But when the House of Representatives resisted it, Senator Flint obtained the support of his friend, President Theodore Roosevelt. Soon thereafter, the House approved Senator Flint's bill. Thus, the Los Angeles Aqueduct became possible, leading to a reliable water supply from the Owens Valley and modern development of the Los Angeles region. Senator Flint's many other accomplishments included securing significant federal funding for the development of Los Angeles Harbor."

    Located within the City Hall Park on W. 1st Street and N. Main Street.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Phone: 800-366-6116

    Website: http://discoverlosangeles.com/

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    Fire Department War Memorial

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    Located near the corner of W.1st Street and Temple Street within the City Hall Park it is dedicated to the memory of Firemen who have lost their lives during duty. It was dedicated in 1944.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Phone: 800-366-6116

    Website: http://discoverlosangeles.com/

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    Sister Cities of Los Angeles

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    Located on the corner of N. Main Street and W. 1st Street. It's a unique mileage signpost with arrows pointing to Los Angeles 21 sister cities.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Phone: 800-366-6116

    Website: http://discoverlosangeles.com/

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    Bella Union Hotel & The Los Angeles Star Markers

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 17, 2010

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    Located on a wall facing west towards Main Street from the Fletcher Bowron Square are two California Historical Landmark plaques. The first is the California Historical Landmark #656 Bella Union Hotel Site,

    The plaque reads: "Near this spot stood the Bella Union Hotel, long a social and political center. Here, on October 7, 1858, the first Butterfield Overland Mail stage from the east arrived 21 days after leaving St. Louis. Warren Hall was the driver, and Waterman Ormsby, a reporter, the only through passenger."

    The second one is the site of Los Angeles Star, State Historic Landmark #789. The plaque reads: "Southern California's first newspaper, The Los Angeles Star, was founded in this block on May 17, 1851 and for many years exerted a major influence upon this part of the state. Suspended temporarily from 1864 to 1868, it continued later as an effective voice of the people until its final termination date in 1879."

    Located Fletcher Bowron Square, 300 block of N Main, between Temple and Aliso Sts, Los Angeles, Ca 90012

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    Discover St Vincent Court

    by DueSer Updated May 31, 2009

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    If you're downtown enjoying the architecture and looking for a place to have lunch you might try escaping down "the alley." St. Vincent Court is a small, secluded street in the middle of all the downtown hubbub. It's surrounded on three sides by tall buildings. The fourth side, the entry, is covered for part of the way so the end of the alley really feels like a secret hide-a-way.

    There are several restaurants and bakeries here with outdoor seating. Since you are half a block away from the traffic and noise, it's the perfect place to sit outside and enjoy your meal. Most of the restaurants here have a Persian tilt and it's all good, especially St. Vincent's deli, which is probably the most famous of the eateries here. The prices are average - nothing is very fancy, it's just good food.

    The best part, though, is the fact that you're dining outside in busy downtown and it doesn't feel busy at all.

    It is located just off Seventh between Broadway and Hill.

    A Downtown Hide-a-way
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    Oviatt Building

    by Dabs Written May 10, 2009

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    The highlight of the LA Conservancy's Art Deco tour was the visit to the penthouse of the Oviatt Building. Built in 1927 for James Oviatt, it was the first Art Deco building in Los Angeles, the ceiling of the lobby of the former haberdashery was covered in Lalique glass, I believe some of it is still original but much of it replaced.

    The penthouse, which was for Oviatt’s private use, features more Lalique, beautiful wood flooring, an art deco bar area and a very unique toilet. Back in Oviatt's day, the rooftop garden had a swimming pool, tennis court, putting green, clocktower and a beach of sand imported from the Riviera. Alas that is all gone now but the penthouse and rooftop garden are still used for receptions.

    Website: http://www.oviatt.com/

    Oviatt penthouse bar Oviatt penthouse bedroom Oviatt commode Oviatt lobby Real Lalique glass

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    Don't overlook St. Vincent Court

    by marinarena Updated Aug 31, 2008

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    Years after first discovering downtown, I just stumbled across St. Vincent Court, a rather charming alley (yes, a downtown alley with charm can exist!) in an otherwise a fairly drab area. The palette of the buildings make this well-hid spot eyecatching. It is located off Broadway and Hill streets and with main entry by way of 6th. Entering here is as if you were going to a quaint, part of the Mediterrean village with a decidedly middle eastern influence atmosphere. Perhaps, you'd feel as if you were in Turkey.

    Here, is where the regulars are- particularly vendors from the jewelry center of the court's namesake. Many are of Armenian or Persian decent which reflects the food options here at the enchanting eateries, including the popular deli named after the jewelry center. Choose from kebobs, lamb gyros or hummus on the menus. Even if you want coffee, you can try an Armenian variety. There is a Frenchy cafe for your croissant fix and as well a decent pizzeria.

    Look out for the pigeons here that try to get any crumb you may leave.

    cafe dining at jewelry center court, Los Angeles off 7th Street, St Vincent court, Los Angeles fountain at St Vincent court, Los Angeles
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    The downtown "Bukowski" Post Office

    by David_trip Updated Nov 5, 2007

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    Just in between the old mexican core of LA and Chinatown, in Alameda, you will find the Terminal Annex Post Office. What is special about this one? It's here that Bukowski gathered inspiration and material for his worldwide known underground novel “Post Office”. The inside of the building has been recently renewed so don't expect to find anything of what was told in his book. Just have a concious look at the building while passing by.

    Terminal Annex Post Office
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    Best Blues Show in Town (Shh! its a secret)

    by kschmitty0 Written Apr 4, 2007

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    If you are in town on a Monday night, a truly unique experience is seeing Mickey Champion sing the blues at "Babe and Rickys". This is an old gritty, beat up bar, with the best music in town. Anybody that says L.A. has no soul would probably think twice after checking out this one of a kind show.
    9pm the band comes on, 10 PM Mickey comes out, and at 11PM free southern cooking is served buffet style. Its a trip! $8.00 to see a legend (she's about 85) hollering at the top of her lungs.

    If you google Mickey Champion you can see a trailer of her singing to get an idea...

    Website: http://www.bluesbar.com/mickeychampion.html

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