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6-Hour Los Angeles City Tour
"Hollywood BoulevardThis tour starts in front of LA City Tours near the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Feel the magic of Hollywood as you visit memorable locations from hit movies. Look for your favorite celebrity hand-prints at the TCL Chinese Theater and search for their names on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. You'll also s Hard Rock Café Dolby Theater — the new home of the Oscars — and many other fun attractions along the world famous Hollywood Boulevard. Griffith Park & Hollywood SignGo inside Griffith Park from high above Los Angeles. Have your picture taken in front of Bel-Air celebrity homes and more. Visit beautiful mansions night clubs on Sunset Strip
From $75.00
 
Privately Customized Tour of Los Angeles
"Experience the most comprehensive Los Angeles tour! See Santa Monica Venice Beach Downtown Los Angeles Hollywood The Hollywood Sign Griffith Park Hollywood Walk of Fame
From $219.00
 
Small-Group Tour of Los Angeles from Long Beach and San Pedro
"After morning pickup from your Long Beach hotel travel in a luxury Mercedes Benz coach about 25 miles north toward Los Angeles. On the way see the twin ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles one of the largest ports in the US. Make your way to downtown Los Angeles and stop for 15 minutes at the Los Angeles Coliseum a popular location for concerts and sporting events. Continue to the Walt Disney Concert Hall a distinctive stainless steel building designed by Frank Gehry that’s home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Check out Angels Flight a funicular railway that goes up Bunker Hill and holds the title of being the world's shortest railway. Then head to Olvera Street
From $99.00

Olvera Street Tips (60)

Commemorative Plaques

Located along the backside on Main Street are these wonderful Commemorative Plaques detailing the history of each of the historical buildings along this street. I only took a couple of photographs of these wonderful plaques, but some are hard to see because of the vines.

Pelanconi House & Pelanconi Warehouse:
The Pelanconi Warehouse and, behind it the Pelanconi House, are reminders of the active wine-making community in the area, dating back to the mid-19th century. The Pelanconi House was built by Italian vinter [sic], Giuseppi Covaccichi between 1855-57 and is the oldest house made of fired brick still standing in Los Angeles. Govaccichi and his partner, Giuseppi Gazzo, owned a winery located across Olvera Street. The Pelanconi House changed hands four times until 1871, when it and the winery were purchased by Antonio Pelanconi for whom the house is named. In 1866, Pelanconi, who came from the Lombardo region of Italy, married Isabel Ramirez, daughter of Juan Ramirez who owned much of what is now Olvera Street. In 1877, Pelanconi turned over the winery operation to his partner, Giacomo Tononi, and died two years later. Isabel married Tononi in 1881. The Pelanconi Warehouse was built in 1910 by Lorenzo Pelanconi (son of Antonio and Isabel) and his mother for storage of their wine. Senora Consuelo Castillo de Bonzo took over the Pelanconi House for her restaurant, Casa La Golondrina in 1930. She removed the rear wall of both the warehouse and the Pelanconi House in order to make one large room for the restaurant. It is the oldest restaurant on Olvera Street.

Italian Hall:
The Italian Hall, designed by architect Julius Kraus, was built by the Pozzo Construction Company in 1907 for Marie Ruellan Hamme. The upper floors served as a center for the Italian organizations who used the hall for political meetings, banquets, weddings and theatrical (operatic) performances. Several stores occupied the lower floor. The Italian Hall is one of seven buildings on Olvera Street that were associated with the Italian community. The Societa Italiana de Mutua Beneficenza formed in 1877 moved its offices to the second floor in 1908 when the building opened for business. Various Italian societies, including the Circolo Operaio (Italian Work Circle) rented the building for events. In 1916, a political rally was held in the Hall by Emma Goldman, a well known political activist, feminist, and labor organizer. David Alfaro Siqueiros was invited to paint a mural in 1932 on the second floor exterior wall of the building. The mural, entitled "Tropical America," featured an Indian bound to a double cross, surmounted by an imperialist eagle, and surrounded by pre-Columbian symbols and revolutionary figures. The subject matter was considered hightly controversial. F. K. Ferenz, who had commissioned the mural was ordered to whitewash the portion that was visible from Olvera Street.

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Yaqui
Apr 04, 2011

Old Spanish Trail Plaque

The plaque reads:

The Old Spanish Trail
1829 - 1848
This plaque marks the end of the Old Spanish Trail, an historic pack trail from Santa Fe to the Pueblo of Los Angeles. This trail was used by Mexican traders who brought woolen goods from New Mexico to trade of for highly prized California mules and horses by emigrants to California. The trail originated as a trail route between New Mexico and Utah during the Spanish Colonial Era and then extended west to California during the Mexican period.

Located on the brick wall on the center cazebo.

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Yaqui
Apr 04, 2011

Look for Governor de Neve statue in Olvera St

Olvera Street is considered the birthplace of Los Angeles and there you will have to find the statue of its pioneer governor (at the Plaza of Overa St) with this caption:

Felipe de Neve

“Spanish governor of the Californias, 1775-82. In 1781 on the orders of King Carlos III of Spain, Felipe de Neve selected a site near the river Porciuncula and laid out the town of El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, one of 2 Spanish pueblos he founded in Alta California”

King Carlos of Spain ordered de Neve to establish a town along the river where Father Juan Crespi met some Indians. This was probably the first planned town in North America which later grew to be the great Los Angeles area!
And after seeing the statue, enjoy the several tacos to be had at outdoor cafes on Olvera Street, also known as El Pueblo Hisotric Monument. There are also several Mexican souvenir shops.

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jumpingnorman
Apr 04, 2011

Olvera Street

Welcome, I am the grandson of an original merchant of Olvera Street. My grand father's name is Juan Gutierrez. My grandmother's name is Lucy Gutierrez. They have been with the street at it's conception. The stands name was "El Balero". Due to the fact that my grandfather sold handmade balero's that were turned on his wood lathe. He was also a silversmith. Mexican fire opals and turquoise were his specialty. Every stone that was used for his jewelery was cut and polished by his own hands. He also made his own musical instruments such as maracas, castanets, and quiros. When I visit Olvera Street, I always stop at Cielito Lindo's for some taquitos. Ask for extra sauce. But be careful. You will get hooked on that guacamole sauce. It's like no other. And the ultimate cup of champurado can be found at La Luz Del Dia restaurant. And while you're at La Luz Del Dia, you might as well use the restroom upstairs. Have a nice day!

johnmarquez
Apr 04, 2011
 
 
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Mouth Watering.....

If you want to experience one of the best tasting taquitos the world has known, the place is the corner of Olvera Street. The way to do it is that you need two taquitos sauce over the top and MAKE SURE that you have them sprinkle cheese gently over the top so it can melt into the sauce and taquitos

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worldoffun
Apr 04, 2011

Olvera Street - the birthplace of Los Angeles

Los Angeles was actually "born" at a Mexican street called "Olvera Street". The street is the oldest street of the city; from the times when there was no Los Angeles but a Spanish named city "El Pueblo nuestra Senora la reina de Los Angeles". That name meant something like "the city of the Queen of Angels".

The long history of Olvera Street is accessible in the homepages of Olvera Street.

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WanderingFinn
Apr 04, 2011

The Oldest House in LA

The Avila Adobe was built in 1818 and is said to be the oldest existing house in LA.

The house is beautifully preserved and now appears, fully furnished, as it might have looked in the late 1840's. It is now part of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument.

The house is open for viewing daily between 9am and 3pm. Admission is free and it is well worth a good viewing. Even the garden is set with cacti and it reminded me that this is really all desert. There's an opportunity to leave a voluntary contribution.

It is accessed from Olvera Street and I am sure you will fall in love with that street just as I did. I'll write a seperate tip on that.

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SabrinaSummerville
Apr 04, 2011

LA's birthplace

Tucked in the middle of LA is Olvera street which is where LA began as El Pueblo. Basically Olvera Street is a pedestrian only street that has a lot of Mexican restaurants ranging from the pricey to the very cheap. All of them are casual so no need to worry about dressing up... all the attention is paid to the excellent food and the decor.

The main part of the Olvera street is the market area where you can pick up all kinds of cool souvenirs. There are also a lot of arts and crafts stores. There's a pavilion too where there are several bands playing mostly Mexican music. It can range from pop, to rock n roll to Mariachi type music. If you're lucky, you can also see a performance by some talented dancers dressed up as Aztec Indians. I've only been there once on a major holiday weekend, so I can't say for sure if there will always be someone performing. Also, there are lots of little carts and vendors that offer delicious Mexican snacks. If you've never had the opportunity to eat any of them before, I'd recommend getting a Churro, which is a really tasty pastry.

Don't forget to check out Avila Adobe which is the oldest house in Los Angeles. It's located in the street market area. Check Olvera Street's website for more information.

I put up three pics, but to view more pics of this place, please visit my "Olvera Street" set where you can see more pics in higher quality. http://www.flickr.com/photos/joits/sets/72157594148245565/

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joits
Apr 04, 2011

Top 5 Los Angeles Writers

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""El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles""
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GracesTrips

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Olvera Street

Olvera Street or as most locals will call it "La Placita". This is one of the oldest streets in the City and named after Agustin Olvera who was the first judge of the county of Los Angeles. This is a popular place because it is to be the "historic heart " of Los Angeles. It is very common to see alot of school children here during the weekdays because it is a popular place for field trips as teachers teach their students about early life in LA. Some popular things to do on Olvera Street is eat good Mexican food, shop, take pictures, visit the Avila House (one of the oldest homes in LA), visit firestation #1, stop ny the Sepulveda House which is now a visitors center/museum.
On the weekends and sometimes on the weekdays you can even catch an Aztec dance show in the courtyard.

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malianrob
Apr 04, 2011

The Firehouse

This is now a museum featuring 19th century tools and equipment for putting out fires. This is the oldest Firehouse in Los Angeles. Admission is free and there is someone there that can answer whatever questions you may have.
Fires used to be rare in LA in those times because most building were made from adode and if there were a fire neighbors would get together and put it out by forming a brigade and using the water at their disposal.
The first fire dept was created by volunteers and the firehouse was constructed in May 1884, completes in August. The stables were inside for the horses that pulled the fire engine. The floor has a unique turntable in the floor that made it junnecessary to back the horses in or out.

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malianrob
Apr 04, 2011

The Sepulveda House

This is the only Eastlake Victorian Building on Olvera St. It was build in 1887 and is now a visitors center, gallery and exhibits atrifacts from that era.
There is a Bedroon exhibit that used to be the main lady of the house's bedroom. There is also a kitchen exhibit.
In all the times I have been to Olvera Street i had never noticed this building. I am really glad i saw it because in the visitors section you can get alot of useful info on LA.

Admission is free and it is opened from 10am to 3pm Monday -Saturday

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malianrob
Apr 04, 2011

Mexican Village

Olvera Street is in the oldest part of Los Angeles. Named for the first County Judge, Augustin Olvera, in 1877, it was converted to a colorful Mexican marketplace in 1930. There are twenty-seven historic buildings.

Olvera Street is the birthplace of the City of Los Angeles, otherwise known as El Pueblo Historic Monument. The colorful village features 27 historic buildings with a traditional Mexican style plaza area. Wander around the marketplace and shop for souvenirs including handcrafted Mexican wares typical of old Mexico. There are also free docent tours by Las Angelitas.

Stroll through this beautiful street and stop for the popular taquitos or tacos at the outdoor cafes. Olvera Street also offers a variety of traditional authentic Mexican cuisine, with delicious enchiladas, mole and other native dishes.

On weekends you can enjoy outdoor entertainment by strolling bollero musicians, Mariachis music and performances by Aztec Indians and folkloric dancing.

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draguza
Apr 04, 2011

Things to Do Near Olvera Street

Things to Do

Chinatown

Located near Union Station, next to Downtown LA, Chinatown is the cultural and commercial centre for the Chinese-American population of Los Angeles. The area became designated as such in the early...
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Things to Do

Ávila Adobe

I didn't have long to explore Olvera Street...and it was very busy indeed on a sunny Sunday afternoon, with souvenir stalls all in a line...but what I did see gave me an idea not only of how LA might...
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Things to Do

Union Station

After visiting Olvera Street, be sure to also pay a visit to Union Station about a block away. Union Station was built in 1939, it's Spanish/mission style architecture has a much different feel than...
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Things to Do

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

Completed in 2002, the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Los Angeles. The ultra-modern edifice was designed by the Spanish architect, Rafael Moneo,...
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Things to Do

Los Angeles City Hall

City hall is a highlight of downtown Los Angeles. A magnificent historic building completed in 1928, it was until the 1960s the tallest building in the city, by law. The interior is interesting to...
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Things to Do

Art - Architecture

The Broadway Spring Center is a parking garage and businesses. What caught my attention is the huge carved reliefs on the sides of the building. Very impressive and encouraging to know at least the...
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Getting to Olvera Street

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  • Sunday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Monday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Tuesday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Wednesday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Thursday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Friday 10:00 to 19:00
  • Saturday 10:00 to 19:00

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