More Fun things to do in Monterey

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    San Carlos Cathedral~“The Royal Presidio Chapel"

    by Yaqui Written Feb 21, 2016

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    We did not get a chance to go inside, but made an effort to visited this beautiful cathedral at night.

    In 1775, the Spanish government relocated the residence of the governor from Loreto to Monterey, making it the capital of all of California, both Upper and Lower. This is the time when the “Presidio Chapel” became the Royal Presidio Chapel. In 1779, Spain and France made an alliance against England to support the revolution of England’s thirteen American colonies. When Spain taxed its troops to support the War of 1779, the Monterey Presidio contributed the largest sum of any in California.

    Fire destroyed the adobe Chapel in 1789, allowing construction of the present Chapel built of local sandstone. Using plans drafted in Mexico City, mason Manuel Ruiz from San Blas directed the construction that was completed in 1794.

    1794 – 1795: the completion of the present Royal Presidio Chapel
    1849 – 1858: the Royal Presidio Chapel becomes a Cathedral
    1858 – the construction of the transepts and the apse
    1860: the first photograph of the chapel
    1868: Father A.D. Casanova begins his tenure at the chapel
    1893: Father Mestres begins his tenure after the death of Father Casanova and remains until his death in 1930
    1894: the espadaña was extended as a complete second tier to the tower with a pyramidal tile roof
    1921: the Lourdes grotto was constructed
    1942: renovations to recall prior Spanish period completed
    1961: the chapel is entered as a National Historic Landmark
    1966: property listed on The National Register of Historic Places.

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    Workers Cabins

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 21, 2016

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    These were homes to various ethnic families who worked the canneries. The markers are a wealth of information to these communities.

    The Filipinos were attracted in large numbers to California after the 1924 Immigration Act excluded Japanese, who had been the major part of the state’s agricultural labor force. By 1930, as many as 35,000 Pinoys – young, single, male Filipino laborers – were working in California’s fields, hotels, restaurants and private homes. During World War II, a number of Filipinos from the island of Luzon, north of Manila, worked in the canneries and reductions plants.

    When Filipino laborers weren’t operating screw-cookers, rotary kilns or grinders, they might be found playing cards with friends or socializing in one of the Monterey Chinatown flower-dancing clubs. The Salinas-based newspaper Philppines Mail reported on the life in the large Filipino community.

    By the late 1800s Monterey’s European population, particularly of Italian fishermen, was exploding. The Italian fishing community became so dominant, made up largely of migrants from the fishing towns of western Sicily, that the Chinese began fishing for squid at night, when their operations did not conflict with other crews. In the early 1900s, Italian fishermen introduced the lampara net from Sicily to the Monterey fishing industry. The Italian word lampara was derived from lampo or “lightening” and meant fast haul and strong construction. The round-haul net helped revolutionize the fishing and canning industry and helped Monterey earn the designation “Sardine Capital of the World.”

    While the majority of Monterey’s commercial fishermen in the 1930s were Sicilian, about 10 percent of the fleet were Japanese nationals, some of whom has been fishing the bay since 1900. These Issei – first generation Japanese – came as single men from the Inland Sea coast of Honshu. In the early days of the cannery industry, the Issei were the principal suppliers of abalone and salmon. Ineligible for American citizenship, they encountered increasing social and regulatory discrimination. Many relocated to southern California. Some who remained formed cooperatives, fishing with half-ring and purse seiner boats, and earning wages based on shares of the catch.

    The sardine season in Monterey ran from August to February and ranged from the Big Sur coast to San Francisco. The Issei fished at night, when they could see the phosphorescent glimmers on the schools of fishes below the water’s surface. Since bright light prevented them from seeing those glimmers, they didn’t fish during the full moon. Nor did they fish on Saturday nights in observance of the Sabbath. A number of Monterey Japanese were Presbyterians and formed their own church in 1925.

    Active participation in the Monterey fishing industry ended for the Japanese at the outset of World War II, when their boats were impounded, and they were forcibly relocated to interment camps for the duration of the conflict.

    During World War I and the decade that followed, much of the workforce in the developing sardine industry along Cannery Row was made up of Spanish immigrants, who had fled crushing poverty for the promise of a new life. Many single men sailed from the port of Malaga in southern Spain, stopping at the Hawaiian Islands to work as contract laborers before reaching California.

    The first Spanish migrant generation established a pattern of movement between Monterey and the Santa Clara Valley, where they harvested fruit and prune orchards between fishing seasons. In the canneries, a Spanish migrant might work as a boilerman, whistling crews to work when a fresh catch arrived, or a seamer, sealing the oval sardine cans. They helped sardine production grow to 1,400,000 cases by 1918.

    In their limited free time, single men smoked hand-rolled cigarettes of Tobacco de la Libre, read the Spanish newspaper La Prensa and conversed with their countrymen. They played the songs of their homeland on guitars and mandolins while sharing the muscatel wine that was produced in neighborhood garages.

    In 1814, the region experienced an influx of non-Spanish settlers, and the expansion of Monterey began. Chinese fishermen were the first to delve into the riches of the Monterey Bay. It was salmon, not sardines, that brought the original Chinese settlers here. They settled in what became known as China Point on the cove of Point Lobos in the early 1850s. When the abundance of the bay was discovered, China Point and other settlements began to grow, many consisting of stilted shanties overhanging the shoreline, with flat-bottomed fishing boats tied up at the fishermen’s back doors. By 1853, roughly 600 Chinese fishermen were trolling the bay waters.

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    Sloat's Landing

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    On this spot on July 7, 1846, U.S. Marines and Sailors landed and raised the American flag over the Custom House which stands before you. Mexico and the United States were at war. American forces landing in Monterey claimed 600,000 square miles for the United States.

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    The California Grizzly Bear Statues

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    There are many wonderful statues and plaques located in front of Calton Hall. The Grizzly Bear statues are amazing and a symbol of my great state. Too bad they were not made to size of a real Grizzly Bear, but they are still impressive.

    At one time the Grizzly Bear roamed in the thousand in California. Captain Elisha Stephens mentioned during his travels in 1844 traveling from Bakersfield to San Diego via Tejon Pass in 1844. At that time, the site was a dense forest of cottonwoods, willows, elders, and sycamores, and he was compelled to swim the Kern River. Upon reaching the pass, he was forced to leave the trail and go up on the ridge because of the great number of grizzly bears eating acorns under the big oak tress. “There was so many they looked like bands of cattle-huge and shaggy, and as large as two year old steers.”

    The last time a California Grizzly was last seen was in 1924, but because of its strength and beauty became a symbol of our great flag in 1911 and state seal 1849.

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    The Great Seal of the State of California

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    Located in front of Calton Hall and at the end of the Monterey Timeline is a huge bronze plaque.

    The Great Seal of the State of California
    designed by
    Major Robert Selden Garnett,
    U.S. Army,
    and adopted by the Constitutional
    Convention of 1849 at Monterey.
    Commissioned a Brigadier General
    in the Confederate States Army
    He was killed in West Virginia in 1861, the first general officer to be killed in the War Between The States.

    Dedicated by California Division
    United Daughters of the Confederacy
    May 4, 1957

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    Monterey History Time Line

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    Located in front of Calton Hall is a brick path with 36 bronze plaques inlayed into the path with a time line of the history of Monterey and it extends from Pacific Street to the Great Seal of the State of California.

    The plaques recalling significant dates in Monterey’s history were installed to commemorate the Sesquicentennial of the California State Convention, held in Colton Hall between September 1, 1849 and October 13, 1849, when the constitution was signed.
    City of Monterey
    City Council
    Colton Hall Museum and Cultural Arts Commission
    Dedicated October 13, 1999

    1849
    California State Constitutional Convention
    Colton Hall serves as the site of the first California constitutional convention. Forty-eight delegates from ten districts in California debate for six weeks to create the state’s first constitution. This constitution was written in both Spanish and English.

    1850
    Statehood
    California is admitted to the United States as the 31st state. The constitutional convention of 1849 designated San Jose as the first state capital.

    1849
    First Public Library in California is Established at Monterey

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    Moon Tree

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    The sign reads:

    Coast Redwood
    Sequoia sempervirens

    This "Moon Tree" is a Coast Redwood grown from a seed that in January 1971 was carried to the moon and brought back to earth by Major Stuart Roosa, Command Module Pilot for Apollo 14.
    The seed was planted and nurtured into a seedling at the United States Forest Service Genetics nursery in Placerville, California. Planted here in July 1976 and dedicated to the: People of Monterey to commemorate the Bicentennial of the United States of America for the enjoyment of all future generations by the California Division of Forestry and the Society of American Foresters.

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    Captain Don Gaspar de Portola Statue

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    You'll find this wonderful statue located downtown and the plaque reads:

    Captain Don Gaspar de Portola
    Of the army of King Carlos III of Spain. First governor of California, 1768-1770. With Father Junipero Serra founded Monterey on June 3, 1770.

    Donated by H. M. King Juan Carlos of Spain to the City of Monterey on the Bicentennial of the United States of America.
    Fausto Blazquez – Sculptor,

    Rededicated by
    H. M. King Juan Carlos I of Spain
    October 3, 1987

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    Monterey State Historic Park

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    Monterey is very unique and has many wonderful historical buildings who are still living in and cherishing. We found a map over by the Pacific House (1847), or you can download a map from the State Historic Park Association. Follow the map or the wonderful yellow-tiled markers that take from historical location to the next. Twelve buildings, including the Custom House, the oldest government building in California, and several residences (now house museums with guided tours), are all part of Monterey’s 55 Path of History sites.

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    Custom House~California Marker #1

    by Yaqui Written Feb 7, 2016

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    Located with the Monterey State Historic Park is the Custom House and marker and it reads:

    Constructed in 1827 by the Mexican government to collect custom duties from foreign shipping, a principal revenue source when Monterey was the capital of Alta California, Mexico's northernmost province. Thomas O. Larkin, US consul to Alta California, contracted with the Mexican government in 1841 to rebuild and enlarge the Custom House. Commodore John Drake Sloat raised the American flag over this building on July 7, 1846 to signal the passing of California from Mexican to American rule. Restored through the efforts of the Native Sons of the Golden West with the assistance of the people of California.

    State registered historical landmark No. 1

    Registered June 1, 1932
    National historic landmark designated 1960
    Plaque placed by the Native Sons of the Golden West and the California State Parks Foundation (Marker Number 1.) and California State Parks.
    Redicated 2014, The 150th Anniversary of California State Parks

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    The Irene Masteller Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 7, 2016

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    Located along the wall on the Monterey Bay Coastal Trail is a lovely mural dedicated to this Monterey's history.

    The first panel:
    The native people of this coastal area - The Rumsien Ohlone and The Esselen - lived in a world of natural beauty and abundance for thousands of years. Their way of life was drastically changed by the arrival of the Europeans. Those who survived adapted to their new world, and today, many descendants of these original people feel strong ties to their ancestors and to this land.

    Second panel:
    In 1880, the population of Pacific Grove's Chinatown was over 100 men, women, and children. Within this makeshift village, located were Hopkins Marine Station now stands, the Chinese practiced their traditions and developed the techniques of nighttime squid fishing. A mysterious and tragic fire destroyed most of the village in 1906. Forced to move on, the Chinese families persevered, and still continue to make significant contributions to their communities in Monterey County and beyond.

    Third Panel:
    In 1875, Mr. David Jacks, whose substantial landholdings included a grove adjoining his Monterey property, made a legal agreement with San Francisco's Howard Street Methodist Episcopal Church. The Pacific Grove Retreat Association was formed, and 30 X 60 "Tenting Lots" were sold, at $50 per site. This paradise in the Grove inspired the saying, "Carmel-By-The-Sea, Monterey-By-The-Smell, and Pacific Grove-By-God".

    Fourth Panel:
    Japanese Brothers Gennosuke and Chujiro Kodani, educated in Marine Biology and Fisheries Management, introduced diving helmets, suits and gear from Japan to the Abalone Fishing Industry of 1898. In 1904, Otosaburo Noda, a leader of the Japanese Community, began building a Japanese Tea House on Lover's Point. The elegant tea house was torn down in 1918.

    Artist John Ton

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    Museum of Monterey

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2016

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    This museum is two stories and is filled with some wonderful historical items such as deeded gifts have come from families of early prominence, as well as community residents. A collection also features a representative body of maritime arts and crafts. We house one of the largest single collections of work by California sculptor and artist Jo Mora. A costume collection contains several significant examples of American dress from the mid-19th century through the late 20th century, from some of California’s earliest families. The collection also includes costumes from the many Monterey immigrants’ native cultures. Handcrafted pieces that belonged to some of Monterey’s first families. Many objects, including a grand piano, were shipped around Cape Horn, in the early 19th century. Some of the tables, benches, and chairs were created here in Monterey. There is so much more to see and enjoy here.

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    Monterey Harbor Memorial

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2016

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    The moment reads:

    □ Look out upon these waters.

    □ Their recorded history began when Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo sighted the "Bay of Pines" on Nov. 17, 1542.

    □ Sebastian Viscaino was first to touch land Dec. 16, 1602. He claimed the land for Spain and named the Harbor for the Viceroy of Mexico, the Count of Monterey.

    □ June 3, 1770 is Monterey's birthday. On that day Gaspar de Portola, the soldier, and Padre Junipero Serra, Father of California Missions, joined from land and sea to form the first settlement.

    □ For 76 years this was the capital of Spanish and Mexican California. Here was the Royal Chapel, the Presidio, and the only Custom House. They still stand nearby.

    □ In 1818, Bouchard, the Argentine privateer, sailed into the Bay and sacked the town. In 1842, Commodore T. Ap Catesby Jones, U.S. Navy, under the mistaken belief that war had been declared against Mexico, seized the port but withdrew after three days.

    □ On July 7, 1846, war actually having been declared, Commander John Drake Sloat, commanding a squadron of three ships, raised the 28 star flag of the United States over the Custom House, taking possession of a great Western territory, now forming all or part of seven states.

    □ Three years later, in 1849, many delegates to the State's constitutional convention arrived by ship.

    □ On these sands in 1879 walked Robert Louis Stevenson, dreaming the plot for "Treasure Island".

    □ From 1854 until the early 1900's, Monterey was a whaling port and the beaches were white with whalebone. Sails came to dot the bay. Later, in the 1930's, here was the greatest sardine fishery in the world.

    □ Look out again upon these waters. Monterey Harbor is small but it has made history.

    Russo Commemorative Marker:
    Shedo S. "Buck" Russo "Citizen of Monterey"
    Mayor - 1959-1961, Councilman - 1941 - 1959
    The Council of the City of Monterey proudly and gratefully dedicates to the memory Shedo S. "Buck" Russo - citizen of Monterey - this marina in recognition of his many years of devoted service to the city he loved and so ably represented. October 12, 1971

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    Monterey Historic Depot

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 17, 2016

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    The plaques read: The Monterey and Salinas Valley Railroad, established in 1874, was Monterey's first rail connection to the outside world. Purchased by Southern Pacific in 1879, passenger service soon began allowing the development of Monterey as a tourist destination. The railroad also transported the many settlers to Monterey, including the first Italians to fish Monterey waters. During World War II, the Railroad played a key role in transporting the many troops who came to Fort Ord for basic training. The Southern Pacific Railroad was instrumental in Monterey Peninsula's growth and economic success. The Pacific Grove branch transported sand from Asilomar Beach and most of Monterey's fish canneries and warehouses were located adjacent to the tracks for direct loading onto freight cars for transport to market.

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    Monterey Municipal Wharf II

    by Yaqui Written Dec 29, 2015

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    We were more attracted to this pier than the typical touristy Fisherman's Wharf Pier. This pier was built in 1926 for the commercial fishing companies, but it too has a couple of great restaurants such as the Sandbar Grill, London Bridge Pub, Sapporo Sushi & Steakhouse, and Loulous Griddle in the Middle. Located here also is five wholesale fish companies, a commercial abalone farm, public pay restrooms, boat hoist and the Monterey Peninsula Yacht Club. The marina is located on this side. The one neat thing about this pier it is not crowded. Lots of local fisherman so be careful of loose lines and hooks. We were able to spot our first of many sightings of beautiful seals.

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