Tallahassee Things to Do

  • old city cemetery
    old city cemetery
    by doug48
  • Want to swim here!!!!
    Want to swim here!!!!
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  • Florida's Apalachee-Spanish Living History Museum
    Florida's Apalachee-Spanish Living...
    by JhwTally

Most Recent Things to Do in Tallahassee

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    Tallahassee Historic Buildings: St John's Church

    by Basaic Written May 7, 2015

    St John's Episcopal Church is one of many buildings of historical and/or architectural interest in downtown Tallahassee. The original church building was built in 1838 but burned down in 1879. The congregation quickly raised money and had the current building completed by 1880. The building is quite pretty and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Address: 211 North Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL

    St. John's Episcopal Church
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    Tallahassee Museum

    by Basaic Written May 7, 2015

    They call themselves just the "Tallahassee Museum" which actually seems a bit presumptuous because there are several museums in town. This museum combines the history and wildlife of Florida to become an interesting indoor and outdoor experience all nestled on 52 acres on the outskirts of the city. There are historic buildings, a caboose and other historical attractions here like the Bellevue House. The Bellevue House was the home of Princess Murat who was a great-grandniece of George Washington who married a prince who was the nephew of Napoleon. There is also a petting zoo, nature trails, a zip line, and many, many more things to do here. Hours are 9 AM to 5 PM Monday through Saturday and 11 AM to 5 PM on Sunday. Admission is $10 for adults, $9.50 for seniors (65 and up) and for college students and $7 for kids 4 to 15.

    Address: 3945 Museum Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310

    Phone: (850) 575-8684

    Website: http://tallahasseemuseum.org/

    Tallahassee Museum Bellevue House
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    John Gilmore Riley House Museum

    by Basaic Written Mar 27, 2015

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    John Gilmore Riley was born in 1857 to John and Sarah Riley. He never attended school but was educated by his aunt Henrietta. Riley became the principal of Lincoln Academy, the first black high school in Tallahassee in 1893, and served until he retired in 1926. Riley was a churchgoing man, a Mason, and a lifelong advocate of education for all. He died in 1954 the year Brown vs. the Board of Education decision was made by the U.S. Supreme Court. The home was built about 1890 and served as home to the Riley Family from 1890 to 1973 when they sold it to the city. It is now a museum cosponsored by the NAACP honoring Riley and all he stood for. Hours are 10 AM to 4 PM Monday through Thursday and 10 AM to 2 PM Friday and Saturday. Admission is $2.

    Address: 419 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301

    Phone: (850) 681-7881

    Website: http://rileymuseum.org/site/

    John G. Riley House Museum John G. Riley House Museum
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    LeMoyne Art Center - FREE (But)

    by Basaic Written Mar 27, 2015

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    The LeMoyne Art Center is a non-profit art museum located on historic Gadsden Street in downtown Tallahassee. The museum covers the gamut of the visual arts and offers a variety of classes and other activities for kids and adults. The museum was established in 1963 and is located in a restored antebellum home from 1854. The local, regional and national art displayed inside rotates periodically and there is also a nice outdoor sculpture garden. Hours are 10 AM to 5 PM Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free but a $2 per adult (13 and up) "donation" is "suggested".

    Address: 125 N. Gadsden Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301

    Phone: (850) 222-8800

    Website: http://www.lemoyne.org/

    LeMoyne Art Center Sculpture
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    Lake Jackson Indian Mounds

    by Basaic Written Jan 10, 2014

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    Lake Jackson is one of a few state parks in Florida with ancient Indian Mounds. The Lake Jackson Indian Mounds are pretty well preserved and are from a later period of the mounds era. Excavations in the area indicate the main period of occupation of the site occurred 9n the "Fort Walton Period" of Florida's history (between 1000 and 1450 AD). The main construction of the mounds was between 1200 and 1500 AD, and connects the site with what is called the "Southern Cult" or "Southern Ceremonial Complex". The large mound is 278 feet by 312 feet at the base and is about 36 feet in height. Artifacts found here indicate a trading and religious connection between this site and Etowah Mounds in Georgia, Moundville in Alabama and Duck River Mounds in Tennessee.

    There is a short trail accessing the edge of two of the mounds. There is also a short nature trail on the other side of the parking area, along with a short trail leading past the ruins of an 1800s Grist Mill owned by a prominent local plantation owner, Colonel Robert Butler.

    Address: 3600 Indian Mounds Road, Tallahassee, FL 32303

    Phone: (850) 922-6007

    Website: http://www.floridastateparks.org

    Lake Jackson Indian Mounds Large Mound Small Mound View From Large Mound Trail
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    • National/State Park
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  • Mission San Luis - Tallahassee's Best Kept Secret

    by JhwTally Written Oct 24, 2012

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    Maybe they don't have a huge advertising budget, but there is one attraction in Florida's Capitol City that shouldn’t be missed by visitors from around the globe or right nearby. Namely Mission San Luis. The only reconstructed Spanish mission in the Southeast, this gem of a living history museum brings the stories and spirit of its 17th-century Apalachee Indian and Spanish residents to life. From hearing the ring of the blacksmith's hammer, to smelling what's cooking over the fire, to shooting an arrow, visitors can time travel to another era where life was quite different than our own.

    While most know that California missions are worth a visit, most Spanish settlements in Florida are no longer in evidence. Even Mission San Luis was burned to the ground in 1704 when the British were on their way to invade. But with extensive archaeological research, the fort, Apalachee council house, Franciscan church, and more were reconstructed on this 63 acre site. I highly recommend a trip to see Mission San Luis, the western capitol of La Florida, the Spanish version of our own Sunshine State.

    Address: 2100 West Tennessee Street

    Directions: Just west of Ocala Road and Florida State University on West Tennessee Street (Rt 90)

    Phone: 850-245-6406

    Website: http://www.missionsanluis.org

    Florida's Apalachee-Spanish Living History Museum The fort at Mission San Luis
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    • Archeology
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    Wakulla Springs Boat Ride

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 19, 2011

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    The boats operate on the hour from 10-5. Cost is $8 for the 3 miles ride and that takes 40 minutes, or for the glass bottom boat ride for 30 minutes for $8. That just re-opened after over one year of not being able to see the depth very well due to pollution and sewer irritants is the water that creates much more algae than it can support. UGH. The ride was enjoyable and you can see birds, turtles and, yes, alligators (200 are said to be along this stretch.)

    Boats docked in water Alligator on the move Turtles basking in the sun on a log Many birds in the pristine nature Cypress trees in the water
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    • Sailing and Boating
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    Lake Jackson

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 15, 2011

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    This is a very large lake to the north of the city on Hwy 27. It is low in depth, so many mereican Lotus lily pads are growing on the surface. It is pretty, but I imagine boaters have to be cautious about where they go, so as not to get the motor prop tangled up in the mess. It is a lake that nearly drained out in 1999 sue to low rainfall the year. There is not an inflow into the lake; it is self contained, and water seeps through the sediment into the underground aquifers so it usually is very shallow. It is a habitat sanctuary for bird species, and the American Lotus flowers bloom all around

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Jackson_%28Tallahassee,_Florida%29

    View of lake and lotus plants Thousanda of lotus plants Snowy egret in flight Picture of the lotus flower
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    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Fishing
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Wakulla Springs

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    This is a famous spring that gushes out water. The source is over 200 feet deep in the lake area coming from underground rivers/channels. The flow is 15,00 gallons a second, and it keeps the river pristine. Ed Ball, a wealthy person who inherited money as a Dupont heir, moved south for his health bought the spring and 5,000 acres. He had his friends come here but kept out the public officials that wanted to do development on their terms. Ball tried to get approval to develop the area, but never got too far. A lodge from 1937 only has 27 guest rooms, and was built by Ball, and it still stands with little change today. It has a gift shop and snack area. Much detail work was done by artisans and trades people. There is a beach, boat rides, and swimming/diving from the platform into the deep part.
    Room rates are $95-125 weekdays and a bit more on weekends. There are no TV's in the rooms. Entry to the state park is $6, and it is open every day of the year.

    Address: 550 Wakulla Park Dr

    Directions: Take Hwy 363, of Hwy 369 south of the city. Go for about 15 miles to the springs.

    Website: http://www.talgov.com/planning/compln/briefhistory.cfm

    View of the lodge Decorated painted ceilings-restored View of the diving platform Swimming area by the spring depth Small beach to tan
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    Goodwood Plantation Tour

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    This is one fantastic tour of the mansion, and the grounds. The main house was built in 1840, and still in the same condition with only minor upgrades; like water and plumbing. It was to be the plantation of Henry Croom and family, but they died in a shipwreck on the way down to here. A family dispute and suit eventually led to a sale in 1857, and Anthony Hopkins bought it, and used as a party haven for the wealthy in town through 1880's. then the Arrowsmiths owned it until 1911, and it sold to the Tiers family. Many upgrades were done then ,and politician named Sen William Hodges bought it for show and fame. When he died in 1940, his wife remarried and until 1978 they lived here. She died and Tom Hood turned the home over to a garden club supported by his trust fund. Because of strange events, all the families left most furnishings in the home, and even many personal effects and clothes. This, as a result is a fully packed home of nice unique and elegant items.
    It is open Monday-Friday 10-4 and SAturday 10-2Pm. Tours on the hour are given, and you need a docent. Our tour was 1 1/2 hours of good information.

    Address: 1600 Micosukee

    Directions: Just off Thomasville Rd.

    Website: http://www.goodwoodmuseum.org/history.php

    Picture of main house and outbuildings in court WAter tower to keep the pool full Interior of main hallway Furnished sitting room Dining room and chandelier of gas/electric
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    Historic Area on Park Ave

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    There really was not much to see along this two block stretch. It is called chain of the parks, but is actually just a green area with some grass and trees, but does have a Vietnam Vet memorial in a gazebo.

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Avenue_Historic_District_%28Tallahassee,_Florida%29

    U S Bankruptcy Court building Trinity United Methodist Church on Park Ave. Knott House at the end of the avenue
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    Brokaw-McDougal home

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    Brokaw owned a livery stable and this became a farm and blacksmith shop; and later he became a politician. He built the house in 1840's, and later in a dispute with Brokaw's wife, Alexander McDougal bought it for $2,000 in 1884, and later his son, Perez Brokaw McDougal. After Perez died, Alexander's wife still lived here until 1973, when it sold to the state for $125,000.
    The state got the house, but leases it to the city for events. The house is Italian Revival style and was once very ornate inside. Most furnishings are now gone.
    Entry is free, but call to make sure someone is there.

    Address: 329 Maridian

    Directions: In the historic district off Park ave two blocks

    View of front of the house View of the dining room View of garden outfront
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    Dorothy Owen ParkGarden

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    WE had a good time looking at the foliage and flowers around this park/garden. It is maybe 5 acres in total, but well preserved and serene. There are themes in the park that make use of flower arrangements, and one area with a pond and rock scenery.
    Entry is free, and it is open 8-5 daily

    Address: 3205 Thomasville Rd.

    Directions: North of downtown 3 miles+

    Streetside sign to enter Peaceful setting in garden Rock garden scenery
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    Knott House Tour

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    The home was built in 1843, and Tom Hagner, an attorney lived here until 1865 when it became Union headquarters. In 1880, Dr. George Betton lived here. By 1928, William Knott and wife moved here. He was the state Treasurer and came back to the capitol to help it out of financial difficulty (sound familiar?). The furnishings are from that period. When Knott's son died in 1985, he donated it to the state. Overall the tour lasts about 45 minutes.
    it is open Wed-Friday at 1,2 & 3PM tours, and Sat 10,11 tours. It is free, but they need donations.

    Address: 301 East Park

    Directions: Downtown corner of Park and Calhoun

    Website: http://www.museumoffloridahistory.com/about/sites/

    View of front of house Inside the parlor Orante staircase and wall painting Sitting room Kitchen of 1930's
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    New State Capitol Building

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 14, 2011

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    This is the new 22 story building that now has all activity except for Supreme Court under one roof. It was complete in 1977. There are some nice paintings and sculptures and murals of the Sunshine State. You can go inside the chambers of the House and Senate, and one good scene is to go to the top 22nd floor for views of the city.
    It is open8-5Pm Monday-Friday and free of admission

    View of the 22 story building Mural describing Florida View of the tree lined city View of the location of State Capitol
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Tallahassee Things to Do

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