More Fun things to do in Savannah

  • Factors Walk
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    Trolley Tour of Savannah by aussirose
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    Trolley Tour of Savannah by aussirose
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Savannah

  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Savannah's trees cannot be ignored

    by Pawtuxet Updated Apr 25, 2016

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Savannah is very flat and laid out in a series of squares...each one unique and more beautiful than the last. the architecture is wonderful everywhere in the historic district.... but the thing that holds it all together...the glue that pulls you in... is the trees. Huge old, gnarled, drooping, languid with moss... they mesmerize you. They keep things shady, serene, mysterious....hiding some of the secrets which you must be brave enough to explore.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

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    Savvy Savannah Tours

    by FatesWarn Updated Mar 9, 2016

    I booked a ghost tour called Spectres of Savannah with Savvy Savannah tours on the same day I wanted to take the tour. Unfortunately, my tour guide didn't show (I later learned that she was sick) - it seemed we were the only ones on the books for that timeslot. It didn't take me too long to get a person on the phone - the billing processors (Zerve) have great customer service and they were confident I wouldn't have a problem getting my money back. I was mildly annoyed and a little disappointed, but my husband and I decided to just go explore on our own.
    While in a super-loud bar, I saw a local number come up on my phone and decided to answer - it was the owner of the company calling to tell me that she refunded the tour we booked, but that she also wanted to take us on a private tour the following afternoon. She was so genuinely apologetic about what happened, that I decided to accept her offer.
    The next day, we met Rebecca at the same designated location and she thanked us again for taking her up on the offer and treated us to almost 2 hours of history and cool ghost stories on a leisurely stroll around town. She is such a lovely person to talk to that we found ourselves taking her off topic a lot because we just enjoyed chatting with her.
    I highly recommend taking a tour with Rebecca.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Singles
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    Webb Military Museum

    by brkilbourne Written Mar 5, 2016

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Webb Military Museum is an in depth view of people from various wars ( mostly American ) through artifacts & written accounts. A must see for veterans like myself. Very insightful for those who where never in the military. They opened in Nov. of 2015. Very amiable & outgoing curator.

    English shot gun used in the Civil War Frank Hunter -  Hunter Army/Air Base German hob nail boots German artifacts American Civil War
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    • Museum Visits

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    Riverfront

    by apbeaches Updated Jun 19, 2015

    We walked along the Savannah River; on cobblestone stopping to explore the people, scenery, shops, and 21 restaurants. On River Street, in the heart of historic Savannah, you’ll find everything from sweets to teddy bears, Harley Davidson apparel, and art galleries housed inside restored Cotton Warehouses. The working harbor—filled with ships of all kinds, horse-drawn carriage rides and street performers add to the enticement of this idyllic waterfront locale.

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    Ellis Square

    by apbeaches Updated Jun 19, 2015

    Ellis Square was named after Henry Ellis, second Royal Governor of the Georgia colony. It was also known as Marketplace Square, as from the 1730s through the 1950s it served as a center of commerce and was home to four successive market houses. Prior to Union General Sherman's arrival in December 1864 it was also the site of a slave market. In 2004, the city began plans to restore Ellis Square. The old parking garage was demolished in 2006 to make way for a new public square featuring open spaces for public concerts, as well as an underground parking garage. The underground facility was completed in 2009. A bronze statue, by Susie Chisholm, of songwriter-lyricist Johnny Mercer and a Visitors Center are on this square.

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    Massie Heritage Center

    by apbeaches Updated Jun 19, 2015

    The Massie Heritage Center is represents the history of Savannah, its city plan, architecture, and the people who have lived here for centuries. The Massie School next door is named for Peter Massie in the late 1700's, who amassed a small fortune as the master of Bonaventure Plantation. When he died in 1840, he owned over sixty slaves and hundreds of acres of land in Georgia and New Jersey. In the early 1850's, this school for poor white children of Savannah was built. Inside are many exhibits, classes and special events. They are opened 10 to 4 Mnday to Saturday and 12 to 4 on Sundays.

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  • brkilbourne's Profile Photo

    Johnson Square

    by brkilbourne Written Nov 2, 2014

    Named after Robert Johnson the Royal Governor of South Carolina the square was the 1st & largest square established.
    The 2 fountains in the square represent where James Oglethorpe had bread ovens built and he also had a sundial built which is represented on the center South end of the square.

    Christ Church built in 1840
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  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Fort Jackson State Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 19, 2014

    On August 15, 2014, Tony, Noel and I was in Savannah, Ga celebrating Tony's 52nd birthday. We stopped at Fort Jackson to check out the site. We were actually on our way to Tybee Island on Rt 80 when we saw the sign and opted to stop. The admission was $6 per person and it was worth it. It is a self guided tour and a short 20 minute film to watch.

    This is what I found out on the internet about the site:
    Named after James Jackson, Old Fort Jackson is a beautifully preserved fort along the Savannah River, and is Georgia’s oldest standing brick fortification.

    Old Fort Jackson is a must-see National Historic Landmark offering weekend cannon firings year-round, and daily interactive programs scheduled March through October. Minutes away from Savannah’s Historic District, visitors of all ages experience unique views of Savannah’s river-front skyline and the Tallmadge Bridge while walking the grounds of one of the oldest brick fortifications along the East Coast.

    Named for James Jackson, the fort is the oldest standing fort in Georgia. It was not the first fort to occupy the site, however. In 1776 Savannah residents built an earthen fort, which was destroyed by the construction of Fort Jackson.

    Visiting Old Fort Jackson
    Plan on spending at least 1 hour when you visit the fort. As you leave the Tybee Depot the site of the C. S. S Georgia is directly in front, near a cannon embankment. From here continue to the sentry box in front of the “sally port,” the techical designation for the entrance to a fort. The open land in front of the fort was once a rice field.

    After entering through the sally port there is a brief film describing the history of Old Fort Jackson. A highlight of the visit is the Coastal Heritage Society exhibits that explain the fort’s relationship with the city of Savannah, weapons used at the fort, and the fort itself. These displays are locate in the casemates (technically a protected chamber within the fort) beneath the ramparts .

    Then comes the tour of the ramparts itself. In addition to the cannon, there is a beautiful view of the Savannah River and the coastal plain. Leaving the rampart be sure to visit the privy in the southeast corner of the fort. Once a day the tidal nature of the river would “flush” it out.

    We really enjoyed the site. I can't wait to visit again. This was an awesome site to check out. I am glad we found this site. It was accidental and worth every minute. Took us about an hour to look around. It is so lovely!!

    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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  • charlenemixa's Profile Photo

    A Gorgeous, Historical & Romantic City

    by charlenemixa Written Aug 10, 2014

    Savannah offers a wonderful experience just strolling the streets and squares of its historical area. Truly beautiful with its rich southern architecture, Spanish moss draped trees, flowering shrubs, and magnificent statutes in each of its memorable squares. A true walking city where you step back in time to another era. Plus lots of unique shops and restaurants to explore. Visit on non-peak season (July for us) and miss the crowds.

    Savannah - tree lined streets
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    Club at Savannah Harbor: Very Good!

    by charlenemixa Written Aug 10, 2014

    We recently played the Club at Savannah Harbor and thoroughly enjoyed our round of golf this July day. The course has enough challenge to keep us alert, adding plenty of bunkers for extra excitement. Additionally, the course was in very good condition. For my husband and I it was a fun, challenging and exciting day of golf. A good addition to a visit to Savannah when you are ready for a reprieve from doing the historical sights. The staff is most attentive and helpful. We enjoyed a tasty light lunch after golf at the clubhouse restaurant.

    No. 11 a Par-5 at The Club at Savannah Harbor
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    Historic Savannah Theatre

    by charlenemixa Written Jun 15, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We loved "Hurray for Hollywood". The cast is awesome and the show was excellent. With the energy, enthusiasm and talent an evening at the Savannah Theatre is great to add to a visit to Savannah. We highly recommend it. Will definitely add as a "must do" on future visits to Savannah.

    The Theatre is within walking distance of the Riverfront and Forsyth Park which also makes it convenient. Have dinner and then stop in for an entertaining show!.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Johnson Square

    by apbeaches Written Feb 2, 2014

    Johnson Square was the first of Savannah's squares and remains the largest of the 24. It was named for Robert Johnson, colonial governor of South Carolina and a friend of General Oglethorpe.[7][8] Interred in the square is Revolutionary War hero General Nathaniel Greene, the namesake of nearby Greene Square. Greene died in 1786 and was buried in Savannah's Colonial Park Cemetery. His son, George Washington Greene, was buried beside him after drowning in the Savannah River in 1793. Following vandalism of the cemetery by occupying Union forces during the Civil War the location of Greene's burial was lost. After the remains were re-identified Greene and his son were moved to Johnson Square. An obelisk in the center of the square now serves as a memorial to Gen. Greene. The cornerstone of the monument was laid by the marquis de La Fayette in 1825. At that time the obelisk did not yet commemorate any specific individual or event. In fact, due to financial restrictions the unmarked obelisk served for several years as a joint monument to both Greene and Pulaski. Inscriptions honoring Greene were added in 1886, but the Greenes’ physical remains did not arrive until 1901.
    Johnson Square contains two fountains, as well as a sundial dedicated to Colonel William Bull, the namesake of Savannah's Bull Street. Bull was a South Carolinian who assisted Oglethorpe with the establishment of Savannah and, as a surveyor, laid out the original street grid. The sundial has four panels, one on each side of its square granite base. The dial itself is bronze, set atop a marble shaft. One of the base panels reproduces a 1734 map of Savannah.[8]
    Another landmark of Johnson Square includes the Johnson Square Business Center. This building, formerly known as the Savannah Bank Building, was the city's first "skyscraper", built in 1911. Johnson square is known as the financial district, or banking square, and many of the City's financial services companies are located here.[10] These companies include the Savannah Bancorp, Savannah Bank, Coastal Bank Headquarters, Bank of America branch, SunTrust branch, TitleMax Corporate Headquarters, and a Regions Bank building.
    Johnson Square is located on Bull, between Bryan and Congress Streets.

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  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    Veteran's Memorial

    by DSwede Written Jan 24, 2014

    Possibly the only place I walked to in town that does not already have an entry here in the VT lists. The Veteran's Memorial is a large steel globe symbolically split down the middle, dividing the spheres.

    Homage is paid to the names of the locals who gave the ultimate sacrifice in honor of the US military here. It is a public display, open 24hr, so feel free to pass by at your leisure.

    Veteran's Memorial
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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Walking in High Cotton!

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Sep 9, 2012

    While Savannah was built around the cotton industry, this is not where cotton is typically grown. Georgia's best cotton producing region is in the southwest corner of the state, including Dooly, Colquitt, Worth and Mitchell counties. These four counties together produce more than one fifth of the state's total cotton crop.

    Did you know:
    Georgia ranks second in the U.S. in cotton planted acres and 4th in number of bales produced each year.
    Cotton is the most widely grown row crop in Georgia.

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  • JckNSally13's Profile Photo

    Slow Down in Savannah

    by JckNSally13 Written Jul 24, 2012

    We recently took a little one day trip to Savannah with our kids and it was amazing. There are plenty of books for the walking tours that you can do yourself. These are nice, but the city is large and if your not wearing the right shoes, this can prove to be very tiring. I do not recommend flip flops! We took a trolley tour. This not only provides you with some history on the city, and the main historical sites and areas you want to tour, but also is your on/off transportation through the city.

    We had been to Savannah once previously without the kids, and we took the White "Old Savannah Tours" bus. On our trip with the kids we took the Orange and Green "Historical Tours of America" Tour. Take the White one. Really. It has much better narration on the city and makes more stops. The trolleys come about every 7 mins and focus more on the "history" than the other tour did. These tour trolleys were also very "open" no windows. The other one had windows, they don't go down all the way, and it is stifling hot.

    One of the best places to take some time at with kids is the Forsyth Park Fountain. Bring a towel so the kids can dry off afterwards. But this is a nice way for kids to cool off while you plan where to get off and explore next after you reboard your trolley. Ellis Square has a fountain as well, but it is just not as beautiful as Forsyth Park by any means.

    The riverfront is very nice if you like to shop in the classic tourist shops that you can find in any tourist destination. It is hot though. There just is not a breeze down there. And walking on the cobblestones can prove tiring. When the huge container ships come in though it is a nice sight to see.

    I would definitely get off and spend time in the Cathedral of John the Baptist. Amazing inside. Well worth getting off and strolling through the pews, and lighting a candle with a prayer.

    All the history alone is well worth spending a day there. My next trip will be later in the evening and I am dying to take a ghost tour. You would be amazed at how many people are buried under the city.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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