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"Boston Super Saver: Cambridge
Lexington Concord""Boston Super Saver: Cambridge Lexington and Concord Tour plus Hop-On Hop-Off Boston Trolley""Take the trip from Boston to Cambridge Lexington and Concord on your first day and then use your hop-on hop-off Boston trolley pass the following day. This pass is valid for two consecutive days (48 hours) from the time of first use."
From $68.00
 
Boston Freedom Trail to Copley Square Walking Tour
"Pick the perfect day to explore the streets of Boston. At 10am meet your professional guide outside of 28 State Street located across from the Old State House. Follow your guide and begin your 2-hour walking tour of Boston.Start your tour on the Freedom Trail visiting Faneuil Hall the Old and New State Houses and the Boston Massacre Site. See both the Old and New City Halls along with Old Corner Bookstore and King's Chapel. Stroll through downtown on your way to Boston Common and the Public Garden. Admire the stunning swan boats as they sail under the world's smallest suspension bridge. Continue on to the John Hanco
From $25.00
 
Downtown Freedom Trail Walking Tour in Boston
"Choose when to explore Boston at either 10am or 6pm. Arrive at 28 State Street across from the Old State House. Meet your professional guide and then begin your 70-minute walking tour of the Freedom Trail. Start your tour at the Old State House and then compare it with the New State House. See Faneuil Hall a marketplace and meeting hall since 1743. Walk through the city to the Boston Massacre Site and learn the history behind the memorial. Admire the architecture of Park Street Church and King's Chapel. Then make your way to the Old South Meeting House. Walk through the Old Granary Cemetery and visit Old City Hall. Pass the First Schoolhouse Site and The Old Corner Bookstore which was a meeting place for famous authors including Ralph Waldo Emerson and Charles Dickens. Stroll through the beautiful Boston Common to end your Freedom Trail walking tour. Explore the quirky streets and charming atmosphere of Boston on this 70-minute walking tour."
From $15.00

Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market Tips (90)

Faneuil Hall Marketplace

A visit to Boston HAS TO INCLUDE going to the Faneuil Hall Marketplace! It's amazing! First we will talk about the historical significance of it. In 1742 Peter Faneuil, Boston's wealthiest merchant, built Faneuil Hall as a gift to the city. Samuel Adams rallied the citizens of Boston for independence from Great Britain here. George Washington toasted the nation here on its first 1976 renovation was the first urban renewal project of its kind (this information found on website birthday. Faneuil Hall was expanded in 1826 to include Quincy Market. The marketplace was tagged for demolition until a group of Bostonians sought to preserve it in the early 1970's. This information is found on the link below.

So, historical tours are available. The FOOD is outrageous! You have to see the Quincy Market travelogue for pictures! Street performers can be seen throughout the market place. Check out my videos on dancers and a vocalist. The STORES are plentiful. Check out my travelogue for some pictures of what stores I visited. The old television show "Cheers" bar is here at Faneuil Hall Marketplace!

Then you walk a little ways past the Faneuil Hall Marketplace to find the Boston Harbor (pronounced Hah-bah by Bostonians)!

Just an amazing place to see!

FYI, There are tours you pay for but the Faneuil Hall Quincy Market Historical Tour is FREE! See link below, click on Events, then Marketplace Events to see calendar.

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GracesTrips
Aug 16, 2015

To Market, To Market

Faneiul Hall has always been a market hall and meeting place for Bostonians since it was built in 1742. Many famous orators have roused the blood of the citizens of Boston from here. It was expanded in 1826 into Quincy Market and then the north and south wings of the market were added after that. The two old buildings were used for plotting revolutions and political things and are now used for art exhibitions, and lots of shops, food stalls, and a tourist information centre. The old warehouses on either side are also now shops and restaurants and it’s a busy spot but quite pretty.

Even though it's a bit of a tourist trap, it's an excellent place to go to find souvenirs and local crafts as well as tourist information. In the Quincy building, there are dozens of various types of food kiosks with plenty of variety to pick from. You can then eat outside in the tree lined courtyards if you like, watching buskers and other entertainment. There are also pubs and restuarants in the area as well including a Hard Rock Cafe. It will be crowded, so watch your wallets but it's a good place to start exploring Boston.

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tvor
Jul 02, 2015

Faneuil Hall Marketplace

The larger major building (27000 sq ft) of the marketplace is Quincy Hall, built in the 1820's to supplement the small Faneuil Hall. Mayor Josiah Quincy, after whom the building is named, was the motivating source. The Greek Revival architecture was by Alexander Parris, a Massachusetts architect noted for his use of granite. The facades are more Roman in appearance. It is an early example of the use of cast iron columns. The central copper dome is decorated inside and covers a perpetually mobbed central sitting and dining area. The North and South Markets on either side are 4 1/2 story brick and granite buildings.

The Quincy Market proper was originally conceived as a foodstore. As supermarkets expanded their draw in the mid-2000s, the building gradually lost favor. Mayor Kevin White used the inclusion of the shopping area on the National Register of Historic Places to undertake one of the earliest urban renewal projects in the United States. As with Faneuil Hall, the building is home to many food stalls and restaurants as well as similar sales stores. The North and South markets are occupied by relatively more upscale stores, many for clothing, and a generally higher class of dining venues.

Just wandering around, checking out the nonfood items, spent well over an hour here, bought a shirt, passed on the trinkets not that some were unappealing.

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nicolaitan
Jan 25, 2015

Faneuil Hall Marketplace

The Fanieul Hall Marketplace is one of the ten most visited tourist sites in the world, 18 million a year, consisting of two famous historic sites, Quincy Hall and Fanieul Hall flanked by the North and South Markets, and all linked by a pedestrianized cobbled street. It extends from the center of Boston to what was, before reclamation, Boston's harbor.

Faneuil Hall is a most important historic site, although far from obvious today. It was erected as a gift to the city by wealthy merchant Peter Fanieul in 1740-2, funded in part by selling slaves. Artist John Smibert designed an English style market, sales on the ground floor and a conference room on the second. It has been enlarged and renovated several times since,

Sobriquets including 'Home of Free Speech' and 'Cradle of Liberty' are well suited to the site which gave birth to the American Revolution. The initial 1764 protests against the Stamp Act and Sugar Act and the Tea Act several years later led to the rallying cry of No Taxation Without Representation. Most importantly, it was the site of Samuel Adams speeches which led to the Revolution. It has remained a site for important political speeches and events ever since ranging from George Washington on the first anniversary of independence to include Oliver Wendell Holmes, Susan B Anthony ( female rights activist ), and JC Chappelle ( an early black politician speaking on behalf of voting rights for all ). It was here that then governor Mitt Romney debuted his Massachusetts health care plan and that President B. Hossain Obama unveiled his Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. Ted Kennedy announced his run for the Presidency in 1979 and would be president John Kerry conceded the 2004 election here.

The upper historic floors of Faniuel Hall are often not open to visitors, unfortunate as the space
is the site of all the history and houses a museum.

The interiors of Quincy Market and Faniuel Hall as well as the exterior walkways and North and South Markets are totally commercial.
Every available exterior and interior space not occupied by street performers contains innumerable stores of every kind, from kitschy souvenirs and cute trinkets to clothing stores selling everything - cheap t-shirts to quality clothing. And food - between the two buildings there must be more than 50 sources. Again the range is incredible, junk food to quality takehome including great chocolates and a similar range of restaurants - pretzels to sitdown dining on seafood, steak, pubgrub, Tex-Mex, and what is said to be an excellent Japanese restaurant. This being Boston, of course, sea food is the primary draw.
The most interesting sales were at kiosks selling interesting souvenirs, some very unique and interesting concepts. Even excluding food, there is a lot to see here and once can easily pass several hours wandering around, people watching included.

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nicolaitan
Jan 25, 2015
 
 
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I Love Faneuil Hall

First Rule of Faneuil Hall - DON'T VISIT IN SUMMER
Faneuil Hall consistently ranks in the top 10 on every list of the most visited tourist attractions in the United States. In 2013 it ranked #7 on a list of the most visited attractions in the WORLD. That means big summer crowds and lots of souvenir shops. Summer weekends in particular are a nightmare of wall to wall bodies. It's difficult to move around, both inside and out. When it's not jammed, Faneuil Hall Marketplace is great. I walk through there almost every day and I never get tired of it.

Yes, Faneuil Hall Marketplace is a tourist trap but it's not a huge place that requires an entire day to see/experience, either. If you plan to visit for the history alone, then you should add things to your itinerary for the day.

There are lots of souvenir hawkers but you can findgems among the trinkets. A great example is Merry Trading Company (merrytrading.com). I think that they have a seasonal kiosk. I bought a sheepskin hat from them last year and I love it like crazy. During the winter it provides serious warmth. This year I'm going back for matching gloves.

There are a hoard of very good, year-round food vendors in the central market, offering a wide selection sure to satisfy everyone in your group. The one place that I can never resist is Godiva Chocolates, located in a teensy shop in the South Market Building. Super friendly employees will greet you warmly on your first visit. On subsequent visits they'll remember you and what you bought previously, which takes the sting out of the prices. I always walk out of that shop with a huge smile on my face. During the Christmas holidays I visit Faneuil Hall for one reason; the decorations & annual light show called Blink. Some of the seasonal vendors are very tempting distractions but I'm there for the holiday eye candy.

There's 'street entertainment' all around the marketplace. I've seen & heard some wildly talented individuals; jugglers, comedians, hip hop dance teams, classical guitarists, pianists, singers - you name it. Yes, there are cheesy carnival-like entertainers as well but it's the good ones, the surprising ones, that you remember.

From Faneuil Hall you can head in any direction and find something interesting. Boston is littered with subway stations so it's a quick train ride to a huge number of historic sites and points of interest. Despite the ample public transportation, Boston is small and ideal for walking. In roughly 15 minutes you can walk from Faneuil Hall to Boston Common. Along the way you'll pass the Old State House (site of the Boston Massacre), the Old South Meeting House (gathering spot for the Boston Tea Party) the Granary Burying Ground (John Hancock, Paul Revere, Sam Adams, etc.) and other points of historic significance (plus a bunch of Starbucks).

If you make it to the Common, I urge you to walk southwest on Tremont Street and go to a little place called The Thinking Cup. Excellent coffee, bakery items and more at excellent prices. If there's no sitting room, you can enjoy your goodies on the Common.

OK, now walk across the Common (oldest public park in the country) and you'll arrive at the Public Garden (first public botanical garden in the country and home of the Swan Boats). Exit the garden at Arlington & Beacon Streets, cross the Arthur Fiedler Memorial Walking Bridge and you'll arrive at the Charles River Esplanade. This is a 3 mile scenic path beloved by strollers, runners, bicyclists, ducks, geese and July 4th revelers. The city of Cambridge (and the famous MIT library dome) is across the river. Turn right and the Boston Museum of Science is at the end of the Esplanade. Head to the opposite end of the Esplanade and turn left back into the city to see Fenway Park and much more.

If it's leisure that you crave, then walk across the street from Faneuil Hall to the Waterfront. Enjoy the view, take a harbor or whale watching cruise, catch a ferry to one of the harbor islands, take a sightseeing trolley/Duck Tour, visit the New England Aquarium or sniff out the best seafood in Boston.

If you do your homework and time your visit right, then you'll enjoy Faneuil Hall and hopefully other Boston locations as well. The only reason that I don't rate it a 5 is the prices, which are jacked up just like any other tourist spot.

LupiniBeanini
Oct 01, 2014

Main Attraction of Quincy Market

the historic Faneuil Hall was once at the edge of Boston's Land as before the sea reclamations of the 18th century, it was busiest market area, together with Quinct Market and Dock Square. This Hall is also known as the place where famous Patriots like Samuel Adams (not the Beer Brand!) and James Otis held speeches and orations to people to promote Independence from Great Britain in the 17th century. The hall was named after it's Founder and Builder, Peter Faneuil.

This hall is part of the 2.5 mile long freedom trail and is also referred as the cradle of Liberty (and where John Kerry had his concession speech in 2004 and Barack Obama defended the "Obamacare" in 2013). At Present, the hall is home to a number of shops and retail establishments at the ground floor.

Opens: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm everyday (faneuil hall and 9:00 am to 10:00 pm for quincy market).

Nearest MBTA station is State Street and there are Bus Trolley Stops in the front and near theback of Quincy Market facing the Rose Kennedy Greenway.

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machomikemd
Jul 11, 2014

Night Views of Quincy Market

this will be my night pictures of the market

the Quincy Market is just beside historic Faneuil Hall and is the main destination for tourists and locals mainly to eat Boston's famous seafood offerings and also to buy stuffs like souvenirs and artisanal and delicatessen products. you can partake of various fresh seafood like lobsters, scrod, shrimp cocktail, cod fish, scallops and more at the food court, fine dine along the restaurants or shop at the various artisanal delicatessens or buy souvenir items outside and even drinks at the faux Bull & Finch "Cheers" Bar in the area.

the historic Quincy market is one of the largest market built in the North East in the 18th century and was named after a famous Mayor of Boston Josias Quincy. The market at present is home to a various number of commercial shops, eateries, delicatessens, restaurants and souvenir shops, the fresh meat section of the Market was moved to other areas of boston and it now have mostly the establishment I mentioned above. the market is two stories tall, 535 feet (163 meters) long, and covers 27,000 square feet (2,500 square meters) of land area and is made of New England Granite and at the center area of the Market in the Domed part sits main dining area for the food stalls at present. Further street vending space is present at the outside walls of the building, especially on the south side, under a glass enclosure. Most stalls in this space sell trinkets, gifts, and other curiosities and also at the second level and basement area.

Opens: 10:00 am to 9:00 pm everyday

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 10, 2014

Historical Market and Eating Place

this will be my things to do tips on Quincy Market

the Quincy Market is just beside historic Faneuil Hall and is the main destination for tourists and locals mainly to eat Boston's famous seafood offerings and also to buy stuffs like souvenirs and artisanal and delicatessen products. you can partake of various fresh seafood like lobsters, scrod, shrimp cocktail, cod fish, scallops and more at the food court, fine dine along the restaurants or shop at the various artisanal delicatessens or buy souvenir items outside and even drinks at the faux Bull & Finch "Cheers" Bar in the area.

the historic Quincy market is one of the largest market built in the North East in the 18th century and was named after a famous Mayor of Boston Josias Quincy. The market at present is home to a various number of commercial shops, eateries, delicatessens, restaurants and souvenir shops, the fresh meat section of the Market was moved to other areas of boston and it now have mostly the establishment I mentioned above. the market is two stories tall, 535 feet (163 meters) long, and covers 27,000 square feet (2,500 square meters) of land area and is made of New England Granite and at the center area of the Market in the Domed part sits main dining area for the food stalls at present. Further street vending space is present at the outside walls of the building, especially on the south side, under a glass enclosure. Most stalls in this space sell trinkets, gifts, and other curiosities and also at the second level and basement area.

Opens: 10:00 am to 9:00 pm everyday

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machomikemd
Jul 10, 2014
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"BOSTON KALEIDOSCOPE AND ITS CAST OF COLORS…"
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"IF HOME IS WHERE YOUR HEART IS-THEN I LIVE HERE"
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"Boston Features the Old and New"
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Dock Square

Just after Carmen Park and also between Union Street and Congress Street and at North Street sits Dock Squre. the Dock Square lies just in front of the Faneuil Hall and across the entrance to Boston City Hall and this square was originally the waterfront and was formerly the busiest area in Boston.

according to wikipedia:

"Dock Square in Boston, Massachusetts is a public square adjacent to Faneuil Hall, bounded by Congress Street, North Street, and Union Street.[1] Its name derives from its original (17th-century) location at the waterfront. From the 1630s through the early 19th century, it served boats in the Boston Harbor as "the common landing place, at Bendell's Cove," later called Town Dock.[2] "Around the dock was transacted the chief mercantile business of the town."[3] After the waterfront was filled in in the early 19th century, Dock Square continued as a center of commerce for some years. The addition in the 1960s of Government Center changed the scale and character of the square from a hub of city life, to a place one merely passes through.[4] As of the 1950s the square has become largely a tourist spot; the Freedom Trail runs through it.

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machomikemd
Jul 09, 2014

Faneuil Hall

A cornerstone of American philosophy is the "marketplace of ideas", treating opinions like goods and allowing the strongest win through open competition. So it seems fitting that the "cradle of democracy", the Faneuil Hall was donated to the rebellious city of Boston by a merchant of Huguenot lineage and used as a marketplace for goods on the ground floor, and a marketplace of ideas on the floor above. Here in this meeting house the revolutionary thoughts of speakers like Samuel Adams and John Hancock flourished in an atmosphere of hitherto unseen freedom of expression.

When revolution called the British shut down the meeting house, and free thought, and turned the place into a garrison for their soldiers.

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antistar
May 24, 2013

Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Faneuil Hall is also know as
Quincy Market, a tourist-oriented
mall downtown ....

Monday - Saturday 10 AM - 9 PM
Sunday - Noon -6 PM

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Restaurants and pubs are open late every evening

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al_mary
Mar 08, 2013

Quincy Market

This is perhaps the most vibrant center of town for people watching, equivalent to Barcelona's Las Ramblas, as it basically is a pedestrian mall that leads from the historic center of town to Boston Harbor. Technically called Faneuil Hall Marketplace, it's bounded by historic Faneuil Hall on the west, and on the east end by a circular plaza area where the hall itself terminates with an impressive Greco style column entrance that says Quincy Market in large letters. The center of the rectangular market building, which once was designed for produce vendors, has a domed ceiling. The 2 story, 535 foot long structure is named after Josiah Quincy, a businessman who had the market build without taxpayer expense in 1824. Construction mixes traditional granite and other stones found in New England with early iron columns and tensioners. For many years, especially after creation of the commercial New England Produce Market in Chelsea, the market fell into decay until restoration in 1976.

A cobbled motorized traffic free walk is lined on one side by upscale shops and on the other by the original Quincy Market building itself, and down the middle by locust trees that shade the area in summer, but are barren in winter. The Quincy Structure is a restored market building now given over to a large number of non-branded fast food establishments, providing good quality food at a decent price quickly, without the heavy presence of the usual corporate brands (e.g. McDonald's, Burger King, Pizza Hut, etc.) that can destroy the ambiance of such a place. Beers and wine are available, and most seating is outside in patio chairs and granite benches along the esplanade. Outside is some high end patio dining as well.

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atufft
Sep 13, 2012

Things to Do Near Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market

Things to Do

Haymarket

Personally, I don't shop at Haymarket. I have no need to buy fruit or veggies by the sackful. And the few times I ever did buy produce there, the vendors wouldn't let me touch or select anything on my...
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Holocaust Memorial

Located in North End of Boston across the street from Little Italy. The memorial can be seen from afar with it's six glass towers. The towers were erected in 1995. There is a guided tour and also a...
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Things to Do

Ghosts and Gravestones tour

When we were in Boston on Halloween we went on a tour of the Granary Burial Grounds in downtown Boston (on the Freedom trail). Costumed actors were giving "creepy" historical tours in the graveyard...
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Things to Do

Old State House

What a great idea! To use a landmark as also a metro station is genius! The Old State House is one of the oldest public buildings in the United States, built in 1712-1713. It's one of the landmarks...
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Things to Do

Harborwalk

As we made our way to see the USS Constitution, we found ourselves walking along an interesting path and discovered that this was the Harborwalk. We past the Charlestown Bells (see video) and found...
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Things to Do

New England Aquarium

Small but pretty good aquarium on the harbor. Very nice collection of penguins. The main part of the museum winds around a large central tank with side exhibits on each level. On the bottom level are...
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Getting to Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market

Address

4 S Market St., Boston, MA 02109

Hours

  • Sunday 11:00 to 02:00
  • Monday 11:00 to 02:00
  • Tuesday 11:00 to 02:30
  • Wednesday 11:00 to 02:00
  • Thursday 11:00 to 02:00
  • Friday 11:00 to 02:00
  • Saturday 11:00 to 02:00

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