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    Ruby Mountains

    by briantravelman Written Feb 7, 2016

    About 20 miles outside of Elko, lie the picturesque Ruby Mountains.
    We stopped at these mountains for a few hours back in June of 2012, while driving back to California, and it is now one of my favorite places in Nevada.
    I didn't expect them to be so spectacular. The area looked more like Colorado or Wyoming than Nevada. It was strange seeing mountains like this in a state that's typically associated with a desert environment.
    This is just one of the state's 200 mountain ranges, and it is by far one of the most beautiful.
    There is no fee to visit the mountains, as the area is just part of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. To be honest, I was surprised to learn that the area isn't even a state park or recreation area. It's such a beautiful and unique location for Nevada, that I think it deserves some sort of status.

    We spent the night in Wells, than visited the mountains the next morning.
    We chose to hike the Lamoille Canyon, as we read this is the most beautiful part of the mountains.
    There is a paved road that runs through the canyon to a parking lot. From there, there is a trail that leads to several small lakes. We ended up hiking as far as Lamoille Lake, as we didn't have much time, but it's possible to hike further, to some other lakes. The trail was only supposed to be about a mile, but it felt like a lot further. It was worth it though as the trail took us past some spectacular mountain scenery. There was even some snow along the trail. We also stopped at Dollar Lakes, which were on the way to Lamoille Lake.
    After rainy weather, it's possible to even see some waterfalls. We saw some small ones along the side of the road.
    There are also some picnic tables and campgrounds located in the mountains, though since we had already seen what we wanted to see, we didn't see any point in spending the night. Though maybe I will return some day for a longer visit, as this is truly one of the most beautiful areas in all of Nevada.
    If you like hiking, and are looking for a good place to do so in Nevada, these mountains can't be missed.
    Yet another great hidden wonder we discovered in Nevada.

    Ruby Mountains Small Pond Dollar Lake Lamoille Lake Lamoille Lake
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    Lehman Caves

    by briantravelman Written Feb 7, 2016

    Considered to be one of the most beautiful caves in the American West, the Lehman Caves (actually there's only one cave), is the only known cave system of its kind in Nevada, making it a MUST on any visit to the state.
    The caves are believed to have been discovered in 1885, by explorer, Absalom Lehman.
    In 1922, President Warren G. Harding established the Lehman Caves National Monument, which in 1986, was incorporated into the Great Basin National Park. Today, the cave is the park's most popular attraction, and cannot be missed.

    The cave is home to several species of trilobites (cave dwelling critters), including crickets, spiders, pseudoscorpions, mites, and springtails, though they are rarely seen on tour. In addition, the cave also contains several unique and impressive geologic formations including, stalactites, stalagmites, and columns, helictites, flowstone, cave popcorn, and over 300 rare shield formations, which are often called "cave jellyfish".

    Unless you're a cave scientists, the only way to visit the cave is with a ranger guided tour. Tickets can be purchased at the visitor center, and you can choose from a 60 minute tour, or a 90 minute tour. There is an additional fee in addition to the park entry fee, if you want to visit the cave, but it doesn't cost much. 60 minute tours cost only $8 and 90 minute tours cost just $2 more, so I recommend just doing the 90 minute tour, to make the most of your visit and see as much of the cave as possible.
    As this is one of the least visited national parks in the country, getting on a tour shouldn't be a problem.

    Visit the link below for tour schedules as well as rules and prohibited items.

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Great Basin National Park

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 6, 2016

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    Located just 12 miles west of the Utah border, Great Basin National Park is the only national park completely in the state of Nevada, and is a must see on any visit to the state.
    With just around 100,000 annual visitors, Great Basin ranks as one of the least visited national parks in the country, which is both a shame but also a positive thing. It's a shame because the park offers some of the most unique wildlife, plants and geology in the state. But it's also a positive thing, as the low tourist traffic, offers visitors a unique experience they won't have in the more popular U.S. parks.
    The low amount of visitors means the park is very quiet and peaceful, and offers a degree of serenity, you won't find in most other U.S. parks. This quietness and emptiness, provides the ideal conditions to get a glimpse of some rare wildlife, you might not otherwise see.
    I found a nest of Wandering Garter Snakes right near our campsite, and saw several voles running our campsite as well.

    Although the name Great Basin is typically associated with the desert, the park is composed entirely of mountains, forests, and shrublands. The park is home to the state's second highest mountain, as well as its only glacier. It's also one of the last remaining habitats of the Bristlecone Pine, the world's oldest tree. In fact, there are so many of them, that there is an entire trail devoted to them. In addition the park also contains several small lakes and streams, an old cabin, one of the world's few limestone arches, and the state's only limestone cave system.

    We stayed in the park for one night, and it was enough time to see most of the main sites, except Lexington Arch, which would've required a major detour on a dirt road.
    There actually isn't a whole lot to see in the park.

    Our first day was spent catching snakes, exploring some trails around our campground, and taking a tour of Lehman Cave.
    The next morning we hiked the Bristlecone Pine Trail, up towards Wheeler Peak. At just over 13,000 ft., it is the second highest mountain in Nevada, and is the site of the state's only glacier.
    As we were leaving shortly after, we didn't get to see the glacier, but we did stop at some small likes, and see some 3,000 year old Bristlecone Pines, which are one of the main attractions of the park.

    All that being said, I really enjoyed the park. It was far more interesting than I expected, and it was interesting to see an environment, not typically associated with Nevada. If you live in a neighboring states, it's worth making a trip for the weekend.

    I plan to return some day for a longer trip, and visit the areas of the park that I missed this time.

    Park Sign Wandering Garter Snake Lehman Cave Reflection Shot Bristlecone Pine
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    Cathedral Gorge State Park

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 6, 2016

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    Located in the remote desert of eastern Nevada, just outside the small town of Panaca, lies one of the most unique geologic sites in the country.
    This unique landscape, known as Cathedral Gorge is actually the remanence of an old lake bed.
    It is the result of a series of volcanic eruptions, erosion, and block faulting that occurred tens of millions of years ago. The lake eventually dried up, exposing sediment layers. The result of millions of years of differential weathering, has given us this bizarre landscape we see today.
    The rocks here are a combination of silt and clay, as well as volcanic ash and pumice.

    We visited this park on the way to Utah. We arrived late in the day, so we spent the night at the park's campground, than explored the gorge the next morning. The gorge isn't very large, so you can explore the whole area in about an hour. There is a short trail that leads from the campground, to the rock formations.
    The gorge isn't very large or high, but there are a few areas where you can walk through some crevasses, and see these walls which resemble cathedral organs, hence the park's name.
    There is also an old water tower at the site.

    Since the park is a bit isolated from any other major towns or attractions, it's not really worth making a special trip to see it. However, if you're passing through the area, it's definitely worth a visit.

    This was my first visit to the park, and it didn't disappoint. In fact, it is now one of my favorite geologic sites in the country, and I hope to return some day.

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    Ward Charcoal Ovens

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 6, 2016

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    About 15 miles south of Ely, is one of the most interesting historical sites in Nevada.
    Named after the former silver mining town of Ward, the area is now a state historic park.
    Until they actually research the site, most people, including myself, think the ovens were built by Native Americans. They were actually built in 1876 by Italian masons, during the Nevada Silver Rush.
    These beehive shaped ovens, were used to burn locally harvested timber to produce charcoal, which was used in the town's smelters. This replaced an earlier, less efficient method of making charcoal.
    The ovens were used for only 3 years, and seized function when the area's Silver Rush ended.

    After charcoal production stopped, the ovens were used as shelter by stockmen and prospectors during bad weather. But they also had a notorious reputation of being a hideout for stagecoach bandits.

    Today, six large ovens stand in almost pristine condition.

    We stopped here on the way back to California. It's a bit of a detour from Ely, but definitely worth a visit if you're traveling this way, as there aren't very many of these ovens left. The only other ones I've seen were in the abandoned ghost town of Frisco, just across the Nevada border in Utah.

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    Rachel

    by briantravelman Written Feb 6, 2016

    The tiny desert community of Rachel, NV is home to just 54 people, most of whom live in trailers. Rachel's economy is based solely on tourism. Known as the "UFO Capital of the World", the community sits right on the famous "Extraterrestrial Highway". Their main source of income comes from the thousands of UFO enthusiasts that pass through, each year, hoping to get a glimpse of some extraterrestrial activity.
    The main attraction in Rachel is the Little A'Le'Inn. Get it? Little "alien". This famous landmark is an inn, restaurant, bar, museum, and gift shop, all in one. Here, you can view photos of aliens and flying saucers, shop for alien merchandise, try their Alien Burger, and view documentaries on Area 51. There is also a flying saucer, alien parking, and funny signs in the parking area.
    The building was built as a dedication to alien and UFO research, because of its close proximity to the mysterious, Area 51.
    The inn was started by a couple named Pat and Connie, who wanted to attract some business and tourism to this tiny desert community.
    Local rumors say, that aliens have actually visited the inn. I don't know if it's true or not, but it's a good way to attract business.
    This is actually one of those fun tourist traps you won't mind getting sucked into. It's fun for everyone, and is definitely a MUST for any extraterrestrial enthusiast. But even if you're not hunting for UFOs, it's still worth a stop if you're traveling this way, simply because it is such an iconic piece of Nevada heritage.
    If you're fortunate enough, you may even capture proof of extraterrestrial life.

    Welcome Sign Fly Saucer Little A'Le'Inn Alien Family Unit I Come In Peace
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    Extraterrestrial Highway

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 6, 2016

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    One of the most famous roads in America, U.S. Highway 375, runs for almost 100 miles through south central Nevada, near the famous and mysterious Area 51. The highway gets its name from several legends surrounding the area, such as mysterious lights appearing in the night sky, and rumors of aliens and flying saucers being housed in the nearby Area 51.
    The highway is a popular attraction for UFO and alien enthusiasts, hoping to proof the existence of extraterrestrials. But it’s also a fun attraction for kids.
    We traveled along this highway back in July of 2010, heading from California to Utah. What I loved most, is that it wasn’t as crowded as I thought it'd be. If you come on the right day, you can have the entire highway to yourself, and not see a single soul, accept the occasional alien.

    The main attraction along this mysterious and apply named highway, is the tiny town of Rachel, dubbed the "UFO Capital Of The World." Here there is a hotel, and you can food and alien trinkets. And just at the end, or beginning of the road, depending which direction you're traveling, in the abandoned settlement of Crystal Springs, lies the UFO research center.
    We hadn't known about it ahead of time, but happened to pass by, so we decided to stop. It was around 5:45 in the evening. The sign on the door said open till 6, and the sign out front said open til 8, but it was closed. I don't know why. I saw a truck, but no owner. I wanted to go inside, but we couldn't. I looked through the door, and this museum looked better then the one in Rachel, but I couldn't do anything about it being closed, and there was a giant alien guarding the entrance. The owner probably left early because he wasn't getting any visitors that day. Visitors of any kind.
    Or maybe he was "working", if you know what I mean. This could be why the area is now a ghost town.
    What's even creepier is that there was a small store just across the street, selling "Alien Jerky." If I ever travel this way again, I will try some, and hopefully the museum will be open as well.

    This is one of those tourist traps you won't mind getting sucked into, as it's fun for everyone, especially those interested in SciFi and the paranormal.
    If you're lucky, you may even capture proof of extraterrestrials.

    Highway Sign Alien Towing Alien Research Center
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    Sand Mountain

    by briantravelman Written Feb 5, 2016

    At 600 feet high and nearly 2 miles long, Sand Mountain is one of the largest sand dunes in North America. It is located about 30 miles east of Fallon. The feature really stands out, as it is the only sand dune in the whole area. It's not hard to see why it's called, Sand Mountain.
    The dune is a recreation area, and is great for ATVing, but not so much for hiking. In fact, Sand Mountain is one of the most popular spots in the country to ride quads and dune buggies, which makes it a bit dangerous for hikers. We only made it a short way up the dune, before we had to turn around or risk getting run over by crazy ATVers.
    If you are an ATVer, this is the place for you. However, if you want to go hiking on a dune, find another one.
    That being said, the dune is best viewed from the highway, as you can truly get a sense of how massive it is from there.
    There is a campground at the north side of the dune.
    I also read that there are some ruins of an old Pony Express station near the dune.

    Rules, fees and permit information can be found in the link below.

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    Hickison Petroglyph Site

    by briantravelman Written Feb 5, 2016

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    This site isn't very well known, but it is impressive, and worth a visit if you're interested in early history. We hadn't researched it ahead of time, but we happened to be driving this way, and spotted it on the map. Since we are interested in history, we thought, why not? It didn't disappoint.

    The Hickison Petroglyph Site is located about 20 miles east of Austin, right along the state's famous Route 50. The carvings were made by pre-historic people, and are somewhere between 11,000 and 12,000 years old, making them some of the oldest rock carvings in North America. They are classified as a Great Basin Curvilinear style, and are similar to other rock carvings found in the region.
    A recreation area has been established by the Bureau of Land Management, to protect this special site.
    The site may not be as large or as impressive as some other rock art sites in the U.S., but it's the age of the carvings that makes it so interesting. It's not worth making a special trip to see, but if it's on the way to your destination, it's worth a stop.

    A short hike, about half a mile, will lead you to a large sandstone rock, where the main carvings are. But be on the look out some other carvings, etched into some smaller rocks, as well as interesting geologic formations. You can also get some nice views of the surrounding mountains and juniper forests.
    There is also a campground and some picnic areas near the site.

    Since I visited a few years ago, I don't remember if there is a fee to visit the site.

    Thankfully, there hasn't been any problem with vandalism, so the site can be viewed the way it was meant to be viewed, without the obstruction of a fence or glass. Hopefully it will stay that way for years to come.

    Petroglyph Site Sandstone Rocks Petroglyph Rock
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    Pyramid Lake

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 5, 2016

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    This is one of my favorite places in Nevada, and since it's only about a 3 hour drive from where I live, it's also my most visited. It's also one of my favorite places to go camping.
    As the lake is just a few miles from Reno and Sparks, it's a popular weekend destination, during the summer.

    I first visited Pyramid Lake in September of 2003 and fell in with it, and have made several more trips since, both day trips and overnight trips. My most recent visit was in May of 2010. We camped there for two nights over Memorial Day weekend, and used it as a base to explore some of the other attractions in the area.

    At over 24 miles long and 12 miles wide, Pyramid Lake is the largest lake entirely in Nevada. The lake is a natural salt water lake fed by the Truckee River, and contains some of the most unique geology in the state. The lake is surrounded by spectacular tufa formations, (the same stuff found at Mono Lake), which form underwater and become exposed as lake levels drop. And they all have interesting names, such as "Popcorn Rocks" and "The Bee Hive". Some of them even contain small caves and arches. The largest and most famous of these tufa formations is "The Pyramid", which gave the lake its name. This large formation is easily accessible, as it is right next to the shore and connected to the land by a narrow spit. It's a popular hangout spot for tourists and fishermen visiting the lake, and is considered sacred by the local Paiute Indians. It's possible to climb some sections of the pyramid. I always like to bring my kayak and explore the other side of the rock, where you can see some interesting tufa formations. I even found a sulfur patch and some steaming water on one of my visits. It's also a good swimming spot. There is also a small tufa island close to the pyramid, and some other tufas that you can climb and get some nice views of the pyramid.

    Another famous landmark on the lake is Anaho Island. The 1.5 square mile island is off limits to everyone except scientists, as it is a nesting site for several bird species. In fact, the entire island is a wildlife refuge, and no one except scientists is allowed within 1,000 feet of the island.

    In addition, you will also find a geyser, hot springs, abandoned mines, and a tribal museum. And in 2013, the oldest rock carvings in North America, were discovered near the lake.

    The lake is also an excellent spot for nature lovers, as it is home to sea gulls, pelicans, and cormorants, birds you would never expect to find this far inland. My favorite are the pelicans. You're almost guaranteed to see some, as they roost in huge flocks, and can often be seen from the road. Other bird species include, Caspian Tern, heron, and Snowy Egrets. I also found a raven's nest at my last campsite, which was really neat, and have seen garter snakes and fire ants. And of course there are rattlesnakes. I've never seen any, but have seen several warning signs, so be very careful, especially when exploring the tufas.

    The entire lake is surrounded by the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation, which is home to the Paiute Indians, therefore there are few rules. Day use is free, but if you want to camp, fish, or operate a motor boat at the lake, you need to purchase a permit from the tribe. These permits are cheap, and can be purchased at either the I-80 Smokeshop or the Pyramid Lake Marina and Store.
    Camping is allowed on the west side of the lake, except in certain areas, which are clearly marked. There are no actual campgrounds, you just pitch your tent or park your R.V. wherever you want, and make your own campfire, which is the kind of camping I like. The first two times we camped at the north end of the lake, and it was packed and noisy, because of the RVs. We couldn't even set our tent up in between the tufas, like we wanted to, because it was all packed.
    The last time we went, we camped at Indian Head Rock. This spot also had some nice tufa formations, and we pretty much had the entire place to ourselves, the entire 3 days we were there, despite it being Memorial Day weekend, which was really great. So I would recommend Indian Head Rock for camping.

    Many sites along the lake are considered sacred and are closed off to visitors. Many have also sadly been closed off because of vandalism committed by Burning Man attendees. These are clearly marked.

    I recommend picking up a brochure, which contains a large map of the entire lake, and has all the information you need to know.

    Pyramid Lake The Pyramid Rare Tufa Arch Dusk At The Lake Anaho Island
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    Black Rock Desert

    by briantravelman Updated Jan 31, 2016

    The Black Rock Desert is a semi-arid environment located in northwestern Nevada. It sits on the western edge of the larger Great Basin Desert and encompasses parts of Pershing, Humboldt, and Washoe Counties.
    This unique environment is protected by the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area. The region contains, sage brush habitat, canyons, small hills and mountains, mining areas, and even hot springs and geysers, as well as dozens of salt pans and dry lake beds.
    The region's main tourist center is the tiny community of Gerlach. Though it has a population of barely 200, it is considered the "Gateway to the Black Rock Desert", and is the last place to pick up food, supplies and gas, before heading out into the empty desert.
    But the area is most famous for hosting the week long Burning Man Festival, in late summer. The region has played host to this bizarre event every year since 1990. Each year this usually isolated desert environment comes to life with a temporary settlement, known as Black Rock City.

    If you're planning to head out to the desert for whatever reason, fill up your gas tank and pick up any last minute supplies in Gerlach, because once you leave Gerlach, it's literally a "No Man's Land."
    Most of the roads traveling through the region are unpaved, so make sure your car has 4 Wheel Drive. Off roading on the salt pans is also a popular activity, but damages both your car and the environment, so stick to the roads unless attending the Burning Man Festival.

    Several campgrounds can be found within the reserve.

    If you need any information about this region, contact the Friends of Black Rock Desert, or visit their headquarters in Gerlach.

    We actually ended up seeing more of this desert than we had planned, as we got lost looking for Fly Geyser, but it was worth it, as we saw some interesting spots were wouldn't have seen otherwise.

    Black Rock Desert Dirt Road Dry Lake Bed Natural Spring Downtown Gerlach
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    Gerlach Hot Springs

    by briantravelman Written Jan 31, 2016

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    Just on the outskirts of the small community of Gerlach, in the state's Black Rock Desert, lie several hot springs, thermal pools, and mud pots. Yet another thing you probably didn't expect to find in Nevada.

    These hot springs are divided into two separate parks. One is Gerlach Hot Springs Park, and the other is Great Boling Springs Park. Though some of the springs are located on private property.
    The springs played a vital role in the survival of early emigrants, and became popular with tourists in the 70s.

    There is one hot spring that you can actually swim in, as the rest are too hot. The swimming spring has two sets of stairs going into the water, though I think it might be on private property now. But if it is still accessible to the public, it's best to only attempt swimming in the cooler months. We visited in late May, and started to enter the water, but the outside temperature was so hot, we almost passed out.
    Right next to it, is Great Boiling Spring. This one is fenced off for obvious reason.
    There are also several thermal pools and mud pots scattered throughout the area.
    Some of the pools contain minerals (mainly iron oxides), creating beautiful colors such as orange and red. As beautiful as they are, these colors mean "Danger", so stay away. Also stay away from any streams or cracked ground.

    The hot springs are off limits the entire week before, as well as during the Burning Man Festival, which takes place in late summer, in fear of vandalism.

    As I haven't returned to this area since 2010, some of the information may be a little outdated,so If you would like more up to date information about the hot springs, and whether you can visit them or not, contact the Friends of Black Rock Desert, or visit their headquarters in Gerlach.

    And once again, remember that some of these hot springs are hot enough to kill, so obey the warning signs and keep your distance.

    Great Boiling Spring Swimming Spring Great Boiling Spring Mud Pots Iron Rich Spring
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    Fly Geyser

    by briantravelman Written Jan 31, 2016

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    This is probably the last thing you would expect to find in the Nevada desert. In fact, the geyser is so bizarre that it is often accused of being "fake". I have had several people see my pictures and videos of it, and tell me that they do not believe it is real. To be honest, even I had to see it for myself to believe it is real, as it looks like something from another planet.
    This is by far my favorite place in Nevada, and one of the coolest, most bizarre, and most beautiful places I've even seen.

    Approximately 20 miles north of Gerlach, in the Black Rock Desert, lies the spectacular natural wonder known as Fly Geyser. Once one of the state's best kept secret, this bizarre site has become more and more popular over the years, even being featured in several books, TV shows and magazines, including an issue of "National Geographic", which accidently labeled the geyser as being in the Great Basin National Park.

    This magnificent wonder of nature, has its origins all the way back in 1916, when a well was drilled on the site, in an attempt to find water. At that time, no one was aware of the geothermal activity looming beneath the desert floor. Almost five decades later in 1964, boiling water beneath the poorly capped well, found a weak spot and burst through some cracks in the surface, bringing with it all sorts of dissolved minerals. Over time, the minerals continued to build up forming these colorful mounds, known as "travertine mounds".
    When I visited back in 2010, the entire thing was about 12 ft. high. It's most likely gained a few inches, since my last visit, as it grows slightly larger each year, as new minerals continue to build up.
    The geyser is also unique in that, unlike most of the world's geysers, which only spout off occasionally, Fly Geyser is constantly spewing out water about 5 ft. into the air.

    In addition to Fly Geyser, there are also two other geysers located on the property, including the much taller Cone Geyser, apply named because it is shaped like a cone, and a much smaller and more recent geyser that looks like a mini volcano. These two geysers formed the same way as Fly Geyser. When I visited however, Fly Geyser was the only one spouting out water.

    The geysers are located on a patch of private land known as Fly Ranch. The former owner, Bill Spoo used to take people out to see the geyser, but now he wants to be left alone. He is currently living in Reno. There is now a new caretaker, and I don't know if he takes people out or not.

    We stopped at the Friends of Black Rock Desert headquarters in Gerlach, to get directions to the geyser. Back when I visited, the guy at the information center told us, that everyone just jumps the gate. However, I read recently that the new owner has reinforced the gate, to keep trespassers out.
    And as I said earlier, I'm not sure if he does tours of the geyser. So visiting these days might be a bit of a challenge, but if you do manage to make it to the geyser, it's truly something spectacular.
    If you are unable to get up close to the geysers, you will still be able to see the main ones from the road, just not as well. But if you have a camera with a very powerful zoom, you might still be able to get a shot of them.

    We visited this incredible site back in 2010 over Memorial Day weekend, and finding it was quite an adventure. At that time, the site was not well known yet, and no photos of it existed on Google Earth. I found one photo of it on Flickr that was mapped. I didn't bother doing any further research, as there were few sources on it. I just trusted that the person placed the marker in the correct location on the map. He didn't. We drove about an hour, on both paved and dirt roads, out to his location and ended up in the middle of the desert, in a completely different county, miles from the geyser or any town. Literally, in the middle of nowhere. We thought maybe the geyser was down in a little gully, and we scoured the area for about 30 minutes, and there was no sign of the geyser anywhere. It got to the point that we actually thought the owner buried it, to prevent people from visiting. After failing to find the geyser, we drove back to Gerlach. Just our luck, completely by accident, we happened to come upon the headquarters of the Friends of Black Rock Desert. We decided to stop, and get directions to the geyser from them. It turned out we had been looking in completely the wrong place. The guy gave us the actual location of the geyser, and we made it in about 30 minutes, just before the sun went down. Understandably, I sent the poster of the photo an angry e-mail, told him about our little adventure, and told him he needs to learn geography, and he quickly changed it to the correct location.
    However, one huge positive about getting lost and arriving so late in the day, is that the lighting was absolutely perfect for photographing the geyser.

    Here's how you actually get to the geyser. Take County Rd. 34, heading north out of Gerlach. Follow it for about 17 miles and you should start to see the geysers from a distance. Follow the road for about 3 more miles. You will pass 2 large metal structures on the left side, and a few more yards you will arrive at the large green gate on the right side. Jump the gate, if possible, and follow the road to the geyser. If you're still not sure about directions, ask at the Friends of Black Rock Desert in Gerlach.

    Stay safe by staying on the small wooden boardwalks while viewing the geyser, and stay away from the water. Although I've seen pictures of people standing right on the mineral mound, I would not risk it. In fact, I think they are insane for doing so. There is a large pool next to the geyser, with some minerals seeping into it, as well as several other pools and even a reservoir on the property. I have no idea if these are boiling or not, so it's best not to take any chances, and just stay away.

    The Friends of Black Rock Desert has been trying for several years, to make the land open to the public. They have asked for several requests to make it a state park, but they have all been denied. Hopefully one day, this magnificent wonder will be open to the public, for all to enjoy, as it is truly a unique site to Nevada and an absolute MUST on any visit to the state.

    I am fortunate enough to have seen this magnificent site, while it was easy to access.

    For up to date information on visiting the geyser, contact the Friends of Black Rock Desert.

    Desert Wonder Fly Geyser Alien Landform Cone Geyser Mini Volcano
    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

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    Grand Canyon

    by Madasabull Written Dec 20, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We took a day out to see the Grand Canyon, and although the weather looked great, when we got to the viewing park to the Sky Walk, it was thick cloud and rain, and even snow on the ground. It was weird, and sad too because it was closed because of the weather.

    After that long drive up to the top, it was back down again, but we thought we would see it a different way, from the bottom. We were going to follow the river down as part of our road trip, so we weren't that upset, as we though we would still get to see some parts of it.

    But if we had booked our trip with the sole purpose of seeing the Grand Canyon, and not been able to, that would have been bad, and Im sure there were many people who were not too happy. But what can you do, if the weather is bad, it's bad. We still had a great day out, as we weren't relying on others to drive us everywhere, and could just do our own thing.

    We are at the top and there should be a huge drop. As close as we got at the top.
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Hoover Dam

    by Madasabull Written Dec 20, 2013

    Hoover Dam is just 30 miles away from Las Vegas, and as we were staying for a week here, we though we get out for the day to see it.

    Construction started in 1930 and it took 5 years before it was completed. About 5000 people worked on the dam at any one time, and this helped Las Vegas to boom, because before the dam construction, Las Vegas wasnt much more than a sleepy town, but now with the population created with the dam construction it's booming.

    We had a great day out, but going over the dam took some time, due to police checks for bombs and other terror threats. Cars where checked underneath and passengers where profiled.

    Coming back over the dam later in the day to get back to Vegas, it took 4 hours. The traffic was blocked solid for hours, and we were so glad we had a full tank of fuel, plenty to drink and eat, and were not in any great rush.

    In fact, we were quite relaxed about it. We sat there with the windows open, cracking sunflower seeds that had bought a great big bag of.

    We were tired though, and were glad to get back to the hotel. So, make sure you always travel with lots of supplies like water, food, and fuel.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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