map
Map &
Directions
access_time
Hours
mode_edit
Been here?
Rate it
chevron_left
 
chevron_right

Top Tours

 
Philadelphia Historical Independence Walking Tour
"Are you tired of going on tours in which the guide knows less than you do? The guides for Bow Tie Tours are teachers not actors or college students who have studied a cram sheet and they are well-trained in providing people information in an interesting and entertaining manner whether you are a parent with young children or a college professor looking to gain insight into the historical activities of Philadelphia. Join us as we see Independence Hall Declaration House Franklin Court the Betsy Ross House
From $20.00
 
Philadelphia Historical Independence Walking Tour
"Are you tired of going on tours in which the guide knows less than you do? The guides for Bow Tie Tours are teachers not actors or college students who have studied a cram sheet and they are well-trained in providing people information in an interesting and entertaining manner whether you are a parent with young children or a college professor looking to gain insight into the historical activities of Philadelphia. Join us as we see Independence Hall Declaration House Franklin Court the Betsy Ross House
From $20.00
 
Classic Philadelphia City Bike Tour
"Begin the tour in the Fairmount neighborhood of Philadelphia about a mile north of Center City. You'll travel counter-clockwise around the city with one of the first stops being the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Ride the Schuylkill River Trail down to Rittenhouse Park stop over on South Street and the Italian Market and then head over to Old City. You'll stop to discuss the history of Pennsylvania Hospital Washington Square Park the Liberty Bell
From $52.00

Congress Hall Tips (2)

Congress Hall

Congress Hall sits right next door to Independence hall. When Philadelphia was the capital of the United States from 1790-1800 Congress occupied Congress Hall, The building has been restored to the way it looked during that period. The first floor was occupied by the House of Representatives with the upper floor occupied appropriately, by the upper house, or the Senate. In 1793, President George Washington was inaugurated here for a second term, and four years later, in a ceremony that ensured the continuation of our democracy, in the House of Representatives chamber, the reins of power were passed from George Washington to John Adams. At the close of the ceremony, John Adams waited for Washington to lead the exit, as everyone had grown accustomed to, but Washington insisted on leaving the room after the new President. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, the Bill of Rights was ratified while Congress met in these rooms.

On the first floor in the House chambers, the valances of dark green above the windows enhance the mahogany of the desks and studded leather chairs. In the south bay is an alcove where Representatives smoked, and drank sherry, port, and madeira. Note too, the small boxes filled with sand near the fireplaces. These were spitting boxes, used in an age when snuff and chewing tobacco were common. Upstairs, 28 of the 32 chairs and the Secretary's desk are authentic. Also remarkable is an 19th-century fresco of an eagle holding an olive branch signifying peace. Notice too, the plaster medallion on the ceiling — an unusual and elegant touch: it has an oval sunburst design honoring the thirteen original states with thirteen stars. The carpet is a reproduction of the original carpet made in the early 1790s by William Sprague of Philadelphia. Its designs are typical patriotic symbols with the centerpiece a chain of 13 state shields. In the corners are cornucopias echoing the wish for abundance in the new land

smschley's Profile Photo
smschley
Apr 04, 2011

Congress Hall

Constructed in 1787 - 1789 as the Philadelphia County Court House, this building served as the meeting place of the U. S. Congress from 1790 - 1800. The House of Representatives met on the main floor, while the Senate assembled upstairs. Among the historic events that took place here were the presidential inaugurations of George Washington (his second) and John Adams; the establishment of the First Bank of the United States, the Federal Mint, and the Department of the Navy; and the ratification of Jay's Treaty with England. During the 19th century, the building was used by Federal and local courts. The building, inside and out, has been restored as much as possible to the period of time when the building was the U.S. Capitol.

Gerrem's Profile Photo
Gerrem
Mar 13, 2005
 
 
Sponsored Listings

Hotels Near Congress Hall

Hotels
401 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices
Hotels
225 S. 8th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices
Hotels
301 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices
Hotels
400 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices
Hotels
235 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices
Hotels
129 South 2nd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106, United States
Show Prices

Top 5 Philadelphia Writers

acemj's Profile Photo

acemj

"Fantastic Philly! My homebase."
View Member
blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

blueskyjohn

"Philadelphia - Birthplace of the U.S.A!"
View Member
VeronicaG's Profile Photo

VeronicaG

"PHILADELPHIA--Brotherly Love And More"
View Member
bct341's Profile Photo

bct341

"Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley"
View Member
Sue08080's Profile Photo

Sue08080

"City of Brotherly Love"
View Member
 
 

Things to Do Near Congress Hall

Things to Do

Liberty Bell

One of my main goals when visiting the Old Town area was to see the Liberty Bell. I can recall, when I was very young, reading about the Liberty Bell and how teachers stress the meaning of Liberty and...
View More
Things to Do

Second Bank of the US

This is one of the first homes of the US treasury, this the second bank existed from 1816 to 1836. it was a quasi governmental bank with only 20% of the assets belonging to the government, the rest...
View More
Things to Do

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution

Located in a quiet corner of Washington Square is a tomb with the remains of an unknown soldier from the revolutionary war. "In 1954, the Washington Square Planning Committee decided to erect a...
View More
Things to Do

National Liberty Museum

This is the only museum that I've ever visited which is devoted to the concept of human freedom. It's unique--NOT just another art museum. To some, it may seem rather preachy at times. But some of the...
View More
Things to Do

Penn's Landing

This is a must for any military history buff. A rare look and navel technology of the time between sail and modern fleets. Well maintained and not altered to suit tourist, as it should be. But no...
View More
Things to Do

Washington Square

One of the first of Philly's city parks, this park was established in 1682 by William Penn's surveyor. the square was used as an African American cemetery in the 18th century. Today it is home to...
View More

Getting to Congress Hall

Address

We don't yet have an address for this Things to Do. Help us improve our info!

Hours

We don't yet have hours for this Things to Do. Help us improve our info!

Map