Snow Canyon State Park Things to Do

  • Looking Up From Inside the Canyon
    Looking Up From Inside the Canyon
    by KimberlyAnn
  • Viewed While Looking for the Amphitheater
    Viewed While Looking for the...
    by KimberlyAnn
  • I zoomed in on this arch, which is above the trail
    I zoomed in on this arch, which is above...
    by KimberlyAnn

Most Recent Things to Do in Snow Canyon State Park

  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Flowers and animals

    by Segolily Written Dec 31, 2010

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    There is more than just geology here.

    There are plenty of desert plants. Adapted to the harsh conditions of hot summer days, cold winter nights and very little water the plants are typical of the Great Basin and Mohave desert ecosystems of which Snow Canyon is a part.

    There are the animals and birds. The Desert Tortoise is an endangered species. They are elusive, but can be glimpsed once in awhile. The road runner, desert hare, gambel quail, fox, numerous lizards and more leave their mark if you can't see them.

    Gambel quail foot prints in the sand Desert tortoise den Yucca lizard
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    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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    White Rocks trail and amphitheater

    by Segolily Updated Dec 31, 2010

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    You can get to this trail from hwy 18 outside the park. While most of the park is composed of the red Entrada sandstone, at the north end of the park the white Navajo sandstone crops up.

    Similar to what is found further east in Zions the white sandstone has crosshatches of petrified sand dunes. The trail leads to a small natural amphitheater. There was a small waterpocket, and old dam, and quiet.

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    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Butterfly trail

    by Segolily Written Dec 31, 2010

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    This is one of my favorite parts of the park. Nothing huge or incredible to see, it is a quiet little stroll through the desert. You are surrounded by huge sand sage, grasses and petrified dunes, the trail is easy to follow and mostly sandy except when it crosses the rock dunes.

    sand sage petrifies dunes
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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Lava Overlook Trail

    by Segolily Written Dec 31, 2010

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    I like to start here and walk down canyon to the Butterfly trail making around a 2 mile hike. This works if you can do a shuttle.

    The Lava trail takes off across the top of the old lava flow. There are great views of the canyon and numerous lava features including an old collapsed lava tunnel.

    You can continue on to the West Canyon trail, hike up to the White Rocks trail or take a short detour to the top of a sandstone hill for even better views of the incredible scenery.

    If you continue to the Butterfly trail you are heading downhill.

    love the color scheme Lava tunnel
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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    West Canyon Road

    by Segolily Written Dec 31, 2010

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    This is a fairly level dirt road (400 ft gain) off limits to motor vehicles. In the mornings you'll see runners and bikers taking this 4 mile scenic trail for fun and exercise. Hikers are not as common, but it is another great way to enjoy this canyon. It intersects with several of the other hikes and can be made into a longer hike and tour of the rest of the park.

    From above West canyon from above
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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Pioneer Registry

    by Segolily Updated Dec 31, 2010

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    This short trail takes you past a small arch along a sandstone cliff, past tangles of mesquite and creosote to a panel of names that some pioneers made.

    It is a nice desert stroll. Look for animal trails, wildflowers and listen for bird calls.

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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Sand Dunes

    by Segolily Written Dec 31, 2010

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    There is plenty of sand in the canyon. A finely textured, soft coral colored sand. At one point it has gathered into dunes. It is a great place for the kids to play. Not in the hot summer time though then the sand is too hot to touch.
    There is a picnic area where we ate breakfast. This area is one reason why I love picnics. It allows you to stop and just enjoy for a short time.

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    Johnson's Canyon

    by Segolily Updated Dec 31, 2010

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    This is the only source of water in the canyon and is closed for part of the year to allow the desert animals a chance to get the water they need uninterrupted, since many of them are elusive and avoid human contact.

    Even during the time it is closed however you can take a ranger led hike (during the heat of the day) when the animals are less likely to be out. We were lucky enough to be able to go on the ranger hike. Only one other family was there so it was pretty easy to ask questions and get personalized info.

    It is a 2 mile level and easy hike. It leads first across the valley floor where you can see trails of animals, sand sage, and lava flows. Then you reach a small fin and head up the narrow canyon and it gets a little cooler under the shade of the cottonwood trees.

    High up on the right wall is Johnson's Arch. At 200 ft across this is no wimpy thing. But it is hard to see and difficult to grasp the full significance of its size.

    At the end of the box canyon are high red cliffs and a perennial spring. This would have been a favorite camping spot in years gone by, but now you can only spend a short time enjoying the quiet and peacefulness of the canyon.

    There is an arch there, believe me. small spring
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  • WinInZion's Profile Photo

    SW Utah's Best Kept Secret

    by WinInZion Updated Feb 27, 2008

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    Not much to say about this awesome park. Spend a nite in St George and a day at Snow Canyon

    There are several easy hikes here. I've done Johnson Arch, Three Ponds and played on the petrified dunes and in the Lava beds

    Johnson Arch trail is outside the south entrance in the parking area. This is a must do and it's flat and easy. Ask the ranger on duty if you can't find it.

    A real nice walk is to park at Upper Galoot and just walk back into the hills. I've been in this area several times and I like the solitude and the rock formations. This is easy and has never been crowded when I've been there.

    Three Ponds is a little more difficult. You'll be walking in a stream bed and it's exposed and sandy. I like this when the weather is cool, I would not do it in the Summer.

    Just parking in any of the areas and walking around is a lot of fun. Spectacular scenery in any direction. Enjoy!

    Clouds over Snow Canyon My wife hiking to Three ponds. A nice winter hike. A wash just North of the N Entrance off 18. Jenny's Canyon - a wall at overlook Off 18 North, not in the Main Canyon

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Snow Canyon itself - the "facts"

    by Trekki Updated Sep 2, 2005

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    Snow Canyon State Park is located approx. 10 miles northwest of St. George. It’s a colorful mixture of all different rock formations and types – you can find red Navajo sandstone rocks on the eastern parts, white cliffs on the more northern part. Also, large blocks of lava rocks are spread on the ground, said to come from a cluster of volcanos just beyond. You can observe a huge variety of desert plants, among them lichens. Between the rocks, and in the valleys, there are sand dunes, and it is said that some of the cliffs even have ancient native american petroglyphs.

    Even if it’s a small park, it has 16 miles of very nice, quiet and easy hiking. Due to the campground near the park, facilities are available

    Address: 1002 Snow Canyon Drive, Ivins, UT 84738

    Directions: On route 18, 10 miles north of SGU.
    It's not easy to find the "entrance" - best would be to park close to the campground on UT 18, and start hiking from there.

    Phone: (435) 628-2255

    Website: http://www.americansouthwest.net/utah/snow_canyon/state_park.html

    Snow Canyon - on UT 18
    Related to:
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    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • aussie79's Profile Photo

    Are the trails groomed?* To...

    by aussie79 Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Are the trails groomed?

    * To get all the above information call either the main switchboard at Snowbird, our main number - open 24 hrs a day, 365 days a year: 933-2222 from Salt Lake City, Utah or 1-801-742-2222 elsewhere.

    * Or call the updated current weather/ski line: 1 (801) 933-2100 (toll free from Salt Lake City)

    The base elevation where the Lodges are is 8000 Feet

    The Elevation at the top of the mountain, where the tram is, is: 11000 feet.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Lava caves

    by goingsolo Written Jun 11, 2004

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    These caves were formed from liquid lava. They are pretty deep on the inside. Unfortunately, we weren't allowed to go in, but we were told that exploring these lava caves is not for amateurs.

    lava caves

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  • If you make a trip in the...

    by KristinaLMF Written Aug 24, 2002

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    If you make a trip in the summer months you have to take the gondola to the top of the mountain. It is a remarkable view especially if there is still snow.

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Snow Canyon State Park Things to Do

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