College of William & Mary, Williamsburg

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 Reviews

  • College of William & Mary
    by blueskyjohn
  • College of William & Mary
    by blueskyjohn
  • College of William & Mary
    by blueskyjohn

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    Sir Christopher Wren Building

    by blueskyjohn Written Nov 11, 2015

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    The Sir Christopher Wren Building is the first building you see when approaching The College of William and Mary from Colonial Williamsburg. The building is said to be the oldest college building still standing in the United States. The first bricks were laid in 1695 and by 1700, the east and north wings of the building were also complete. The building was simply known as "The College" until 1931 when the building was named Sir Christopher Wren Building for acknowledgement of the architect of this building.

    The building was gutted by fire three times. The first fire was in 1705. It took 11 years to gain funding from England to restore. The next fire took place in 1859 but quickly restored. However, this did not last long because in 1862, Union soldiers set fire to the building during the Civil War.

    Today, the building has a memorial hall as well as meeting rooms and class rooms. The building also plays a large roll with Freshmen at The College of William and Mary. During a ceremony welcoming the freshmen, they walk through the Wren building to be greeted by the entire student body waiting for them in the large courtyard before the Sunken Garden. I've heard this is a very special and moving event.

    Directions: The far east end on the campus William and Mary.

    Website: http://www.wm.edu/about/history/historiccampus/wrenbuilding/

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    Norborne Berkeley, baron de Botetourt

    by blueskyjohn Written Nov 11, 2015

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    On the campus of the College of William and Mary is a statue of Norborne Berkeley, baron de Botetourt, who was the royal governor of Virginia from 1768 until his death in 1770. Norborne Berkeley was born in London, England 1717. He served in the House of Commons from 1741 until 1764, when he procured the revival of the barony of Botetourt and became a member of the House of Lords.

    Sir Jeffery Amherst, who was the current governor of Virginia refused to reside in the colony. Because of this the earl of Hillsborough (secretary of state responsible for the Colonies) arranged for the dismissal of Amherst and appointed Botetourt as governor of Virginia.

    Botetourt arrived in Williamsburg on October 26, 1768. Charming, generous, and diligent in attending to business, he lived in the capital for almost two years and became immensely popular. Botetourt restored friendly relations between the government and the church that had been disrupted during Fauquier's administration, and he made himself a patron of education. He attended morning prayers with the students at the College of William and Mary almost every day, instituted the Botetourt Medal to reward scholastic excellence, and became rector of the college in 1769.

    The climactic event of Botetourt's administration occurred on May 17, 1769, when he abruptly dissolved the General Assembly after the House of Burgesses adopted an address to the king criticizing parliamentary policies and asserting that only the General Assembly could tax the people of Virginia. The good will that Botetourt had created during his first winter in Virginia kept events from getting out of hand or destroying his influence. Most Virginians believed that Botetourt disapproved of British policies, but in a secret letter of May 23, 1769, the governor advised Hillsborough to take a firm stand against colonial protests.

    Botetourt died of erysipelas (a skin infection) in the governor's palace in Williamsburg on October 15, 1770, and was buried in the chapel at the College of William and Mary. He was honored more than any other royal governor. The House of Burgesses also commissioned this marble statue of Governor Botetourt that is now at the College of William and Mary.

    Directions: In front of the Wren Building on the Campus of William and Mary.

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    college of william and mary

    by doug48 Updated Dec 20, 2011

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    pictured is the wren building on the campus of the college of william and mary. the college of william and mary was founded by reverend james blair in 1693. the school is named after king william III and queen mary II who issued a royal charter to fund the school. the college of william and mary is the second oldest college in the united states after harvard university. famous alumni of william and mary are presidents thomas jefferson, james monroe, john tyler, and 16 signers of the declaration of independence. the college of william and mary was closed during the civil war and it's buildings were used as confederate barracks and later a field hospital. in september 1862 drunken soldiers of 5 th pennsylvania cavalry set fire to the college building and the wren building. for those interested in architecture and history the campus of the college of william and mary is well worth a visit when in williamsburg.

    Address: west end of the duke of gloucester street.

    Directions: two blocks west of colonial williamsburg, downtown.

    Website: http://www.wm.edu/

    wren building james blair
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    The College of William and Mary in Virginia

    by lonestar_philomath Updated Mar 8, 2008

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    The College of William and Mary in Virginia was founded in 1693 by a Royal Charter issued by King William III and Queen Mary II of England. With the cessation of the War for independence in 1776, the college severed its ties to England. During the Civil War the college closed because the Confederate Army conscripted all the male students. In 1779 Thomas Jefferson established Honor System at William & Mary's. Almost every entering student recites the Honor Pledge during orientation week in the Wren Building pledging:

    "As a Member of the William & Mary community I pledge, on my Honor, not to lie, cheat, or steal in either my academic or personal life. I understand that such acts violate the Honor Code and undermine the community of trust of which we are all stewards."

    Some of the school's past graduates include:
    U.S. Presidents:
    George Washington
    Thomas Jefferson
    James Monroe
    John Tyler
    U.S. Supreme Court:
    Chief Justice John Marshall
    The 16 signers of the Declaration of Independence.
    Noted legal scholar George Wythe

    Graduate schools at William and Mary:
    William & Mary Law School (Marshall-Wythe)
    Mason School of Business
    Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
    Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy
    School of Education
    Virginia Institute of Marine Science

    Other:
    The Wren Building is described as the oldest educational building in continuous use in the United States.

    Website: http://www.wm.edu/

    The Sir Christopher Wren Building Baron de Botetourt, Governor of VA 1768-1770
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    College of William and Mary

    by Jefie Written Aug 30, 2004

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    Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second oldest educational institution in the U.S. Visitors can walk around its beautiful campus and visit some of its building, including the Sir Christopher Wren building (1695-1699).

    Some of WM's most illustrious students include George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and, more recently, Jon Stewart (host of the Daily Show)!

    Address: Next to Colonial Williamsburg

    Directions: http://www.wm.edu/admission/downloads/directns.pdf

    Phone: 757-221-4000

    Website: http://www.wm.edu/

    Wren Building
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  • College of William & Mary - Wren Building

    by grkboiler Written Mar 1, 2004

    The Wren Building, located in Colonial Williamsburg, is the oldest academic structure in use in America. The building is used by the College of William and Mary, which is the 2nd oldest college in the USA, behind Harvard.

    The Wren Building was started in 1695 and restored by John D. Rockefeller in the 1920's. The building has also served as a hospital, for the French during the American Revolution, and for the Confederate Army during the Civil War. The building was destroyed and looted in 1862 by Union troops.

    The College of William and Mary uses the building for classes, receptions, and other special occasions. The chapel on the 2nd floor is used for weddings and student church services. The 1st floor is used as an exhibition for Colonial Williamsburg.

    Address: Colonial Williamsburg

    Website: http://www.history.org/visit/tourTheTown/flash/learnmore.cfm?goUrl=/Almanack/places/hb/hbwren.cfm

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    Wren Building, College of William & Mary

    by b1bob Written Oct 18, 2002

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    The College of William & Mary is the second oldest college in America, second only to Harvard, thus the oldest college in the South.

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    William and Mary College

    by larsy Written Sep 12, 2002

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    The second oldest college in America,the best small public college and Alma Mater to Thomas Jefferson, Jon Stewart and my friend Jason, so basically its has to be a cool place.

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