Manta Things to Do

  • News media at port entrance
    News media at port entrance
    by grandmaR
  • Depiction of a local village
    Depiction of a local village
    by grandmaR
  • Tuna boats rafted on the dock from a bus
    Tuna boats rafted on the dock from a bus
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Things to Do in Manta

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    The Big Tuna - Port

    by grandmaR Updated May 31, 2015

    Manta is a big tuna port. They call themselves the World Capitol of Tuna. According to official figures, Ecuador takes the largest tuna catch in the eastern Pacific. Most of that activity was concentrated in Manta. There is a huge statue of a tuna at the entrance to the commercial docks. One of the interesting things to do if you are on a cruise ship is to watch the tuna boats come in and unload. They swing nets full of tuna over and drop the fish into dump trucks.

    The tuna boats probably use an ammonia refrigeration system. Ammonia is not just nasty to smell. It is flammable and can cause burns and/or asphyxiation. So on our first trip there was an explosion on a tuna boat which killed one person and resulted in the port being closed for a time. When we got back to the port, the media people were clustered around the entrance.

    In spite of the fact that they do a lot of tuna fishing, Ecuadorans don't eat much seafood.

    Website: http://www.ipsnews.net/2010/12/ecuador-manta-the-world-capital-of-tuna/

    Tuna statue outside the port News media at port entrance Tuna boats rafted on the dock from a bus Harbor from the streetside Fish from the cruise ship deck
    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Cruise
    • Budget Travel

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    Central Bank Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 25, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bahía de Caráquez (The Central Bank Museum) includes an important collection of Manta's Pre-Columbian craft. By the first millennium, South America’s vast rainforests, mountains, plains, and coasts were the home of tens of millions of people. Some groups formed permanent settlements. Among those groups were the Valdivia of Ecuador who were among the most important sedentary Amerindian groups in South America. They concentrated on the coast.

    The museum includes a permanent exhibit room of the archeology of the seven cultures that inhabited the province of Manabi from 4.200 BC to 1.530 AC: Valdivia, Machalilla, Chorrera, Guangala, Bahía, Jama-Coaque and Manteño-Huancavilca

    You may be particularly interested in the coca shamans of the Jama-Coaque culture that could extract the hallucinogenic effects of the coca leaves without chemical processes. They combined lime and ash to neutralize the harmful effects and extract the hallucinogenic juices. Another thing worth admiring of this same culture are the gigantic huts that are impressively similar to the Asian-Pacific pagodas. Tnere is also a mural that represents the long voyages of the natives on balsa boats.

    Archeological findings have shown that the Ecuadorian natives were one of the oldest in the Americas, spanning from 3500 to 1800 BCE. The Valdivia lived in a community that built its houses in a circle or oval around a central plaza, and were sedentary people that lived off farming and fishing, though occasionally they went hunting for deer. From the remains that have been found, it has been determined that Valdivians cultivated maize, kidney beans, squash, cassava, hot peppers, and cotton plants, the last of which was used to make clothing. Valdivian pottery initially was rough and practical, but it became showy, delicate, and big over time. They generally used red and gray colors; and the polished dark red pottery is characteristic of the Valdivia period. In their ceramics and stone works, the Valdivia culture shows a progression from the most simple to much more complicated works.

    The museum is open Tuesdays to Saturdays from 9h00 to 17h00. Entrance is $2.00 which should include a tour in English, but we did not know about this and so only saw a film in Spanish.

    Address: Avenida 8 and Calle 7

    Depiction of a local village Owl ceramics Gold jewelry Reconstruction of a Burial Skull and pottery
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise
    • Museum Visits

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    Beautiful Beaches of San Lorenzo

    by osiekhan Updated Mar 26, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Off the beaten path, the beach of San Lorenzo is a nice getaway. Check out the cafe/inn (Cabanas) on the beach and ask about the rain forest tours nearby. Depending on the time of the year, you can do whale watching as well.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Beaches
    • Whale Watching

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    Learn Spanish in Manta - Apprenez l'espagnol ici

    by Maillekeul Written Aug 31, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We had great time with the Buchelis and we lerarned a more than basic spanish thanks to the lovely teachers of this school... A good address to learn this language next to the ocean...

    On s'est beaucoup amuses en compagnie des Bucheli, directeurs de l'ecole, et on a appris un espagnol plus que correct grace a des profs bien sympas... Une bonne adresse pour apprendre cette langue pas loin de l'ocean...

    Address: Avenida 24 y Calle 15

    Phone: (593-5) 610-838

    Website: http://www.surpacifico.k12.ec

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

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Manta Things to Do

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