Wenshu Temple, Chengdu

3.5 out of 5 stars 26 Reviews

Just off Renmin Zhong Lu on Wenshu Yuan Jie

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  • Wenshu Temple
    by Willettsworld
  • Wenshu Temple
    by Willettsworld
  • Wenshu Temple
    by Willettsworld
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    Wenshu Monastery

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wenshu Monastery is a famous Buddhist temple in China and is one of four major temples of Zen Buddhism. Initially built in the Sui Dynasty (605-617), Wenshu Monastery was once called Xinxiang Temple. Having undergone times of thriving during the dynasties of Tang, Song, Yuan and Ming, it was destroyed in a war at the end of the Ming Dynasty.

    In 1681, during the reign of Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), Cidu, an accomplished Buddhist monk, came to the monastery. He built a simple hut between two trees and for several years lived an ascetic life there. Legend has it when Cidu was being cremated; the statue of Wensu (Bodhisattva Manjusri in Sanskrit) appeared in the flames, staying for a long time. So people regarded Cidu as the reincarnation of the Bodhisattva Manjusri. Thereafter, Xinxiang Temple became Wenshu Monastery when it was rebuilt in 1697.

    The temple covers a large area of some 200,000 square meters and features six major halls positioned along the central axis. There are 200 statues of Buddha’s and Bodhisattvas moulded in copper, iron, bronze, jade, gauze and clay, or carved from wood and stone. Since the Tang and Song dynasties, over 500 pieces of painting and calligraphy by celebrities have been stored here. The monastery is a must visit whilst in Chengdu.

    Open: 8am-6pm. Admission: Y5.

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    Hall of Lokapalas

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the main entrance hall into the monastery complex. It was built in the 45th year during the reign of Emperor Kangxi in 1706 and then rebuilt in 1821. Enshrined in the centre of the hall is a 1.7 meter high sitting copper statue of Maitreya Bodhisattva moulded in 1829. He is the Future Buddha and is sometimes known as the laughing Buddha. On either side of him on the sides of the hall are the four temple guardians.

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    Hall of Three Saints

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Hall of Three Saints is the first hall you'll come to after stepping through the main entrance gate known as the Hall of Lokapalas. The hall is flanked by the drum tower on the left and the bell tower on the right. The hall features a single-eaved roof and was built in the 36th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi in 1697 and was renovated in 1815. Enshrined in the hall are riding statues of the three saints: Avalokitesvara, Manjusri and Samantabhadra. They were moulded in 1829 and symbolise mercy, wisdom and aspiration. On the two sides of the hall are iron statues of Emperor Wenchang and Emperor Guansheng which were moulded during the reign of Emperor Tongzhi.

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    Sakyamuni Hall

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This hall is the next hall after the Hall of Three Saints. Again, the hall features a single-eaved roof and was built in the 36th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi in 1697. It was then rebuilt in 1741 and then expanded in 1818. Enshrined in the hall is a 2.64 meter high sitting statue of Sakyamuni made out of copper which was moulded in 1829. He is the founder of Buddhism. Flanking him are the statues of Mahakasyapa and Ananda, his austerity and attendant disciples. In front of the Sakyamuni statue is a 1.32 meter high copper statue of the 32-armed Avalokitesvara.

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    Dharma Preaching Hall

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This hall is the next hall after the Sakyamuni Hall and, again, features a single-eaved roof and was built in the 36th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi in 1697. It was then rebuilt in 1807. Enshrined in the very centre of the hall are the gauze and clay moulded statues of the Medicine Buddha and twelve Yaksas. On the two sides of the hall are enshrined the clay statues of the 18 Arhats (the 18 disciples of Buddha), 18 temple guardians and 24 Devalokas.

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    Tripitaka Pavilion

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The last hall in this particular line is the Tripitaka Pavilion which is also known as the Scripture Pavilion. It was originally built in the 36th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi in 1697 and was rebuilt in 1824. The pavilion has two storeys with a depository for holding Buddhist scriptures upstairs and a place for holding Buddhist ceremonies downstairs. Enshrined here is a jade Buddha, a present from Burma.

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    Pavilion of Six

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This pavilion was originally built in the 22nd year of the reign of Emperor Jiaqing in 1817. It used to be a wooden structure and used for garden decoration. In 1873, the ninth master abbot Sengwu Xiufu rebuilt it and added a small tablet of "Pavilion of Six" on the pavilion. "Six" is a common Buddhist numeral suggesting the "six senses", "six gunas", "six thoughts", "six characteristics" and "six metaphors".

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    Teahouse

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Wenshu Monastery is a famous place to come and take tea. The whole complex features some nice gardens and some teahouses which seem to be built in the gardens so that people can relax and be socialable.

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    Wenshu Temple

    by John195123 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Praying at Wenshu Temple
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    This is a fairly large place with nice grounds, gardens and trees. The entrance is easy enough to find, but the ticket window is just a hole in one of the exterior walls. Take a while to stroll the grounds. This Temple isn't as intricately decorated as some, but it's still nice.

    Five images. More at the travelogue, "Scenes From Wenshu Temple".

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    Recovering

    by dutchboycalledjan Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This Monastery - or Xin Xian Temple - was full of life when we arrived, as some ceremony was being performed. We had lunch at the vegetarian restaurant (menu in English, we sat outside, recommended) and drank tea in its tea garden. It is peaceful place with all kind of activities, including singing birds, lazy cats and temple building. Outisde the temple (or monastery) some modern streets are lined with reconstructed shops.

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    Wenshu Temple

    by mishkah Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I actually wandered in here by accident, looking for my accommodation (which was right next door).

    Wenshu Temple is one of "the" sights of Chengdu but I didn't find it to be overly crowded as I'd thought it might be. Y5 entry, and another Y20 getting away from the panhandlers that bustled up as soon as they saw me (hey, it's the price of a quiet life so I never mind), the temple is supposedly one of the oldest in China but doesn't actually have all that much in it that's on public view.

    Great vegetarian restaurant, and interesting monks' quarters (including one room I was pretty sure I was not supposed to be in - I could tell this by the monk I walked in on getting changed! I'm very observant like that.)

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    Temple of the God of Wisdom

    by Christianzagar Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    monks slippers at wenshu

    Wenshu--- Is Chengdu's largest buddhist temple and bus loads of tour groups pass through the prove it! Check out the tea house (garden) supposedly Chengdu's largest. It seems to be pretty popular as we were unable to find an empty seat anywhere.
    The Vegetarian restaurant is yummy and the prices are reasonable. You have lots of interesting looking faux-meat dishes.

    The temple(though crowded) is very beautiful and worth visiting.

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    Not only the temple but also the food !!!

    by 1W1V Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wushu temple was a bit disappointing to me but I must admit that coming from Tibet it was hard to find more breathtaking buddhist temple.
    Nevetheless, the place is probably very interesting for smbd who doesn't go to Tibet.
    An extra incentive to visit Wushu temple is that in the premises, there is a super delicious veg restaurant.
    Have a try !!!

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    Wenshu Temple, temple of Buddha of wisdom

    by sachara Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wenshu temple

    The Wenshu Temple lays in the northern part of the centre. This Buddhist temple '' the Temple of the Buddha of Wisdom'' is built during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD), destroyed during the Ming dynasty and rebuilt in 1691.
    Nowadays is the Wenshu Temple one of the most active Buddhist centres in China and also the headquarter of the Buddhist Association of Sichuan.

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    Wenshu temple, worshipping

    by sachara Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wenchu Temple

    In the weekends a lot of devotees gather in the temple for baifu, worshipping Buddha.
    The temple has five main halls with a collections of Chinese and Asian objects, an important Buddha statue from Tibet and a white statue from Burma.
    We enjoyed our visit at a saturday with a lot of worshipping people around and the smell of burning incense. It was a special atmosphere.

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